SEGA decide to drop out of nowhere Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA Mega Mix+ on Steam. The good news is that thanks to Proton, it works out of the box on Linux and Steam Deck. A very popular rhythm game series, so to see it arrive on PC is awesome. Not that I'm any good at it mind you, or that I've ever personally played one in the series before but I tried it for science.

Features:

  • Over 170 Songs - Project DIVA debuts on PC with over 170 playable songs, each accompanied by a unique music video. Get into classics like “Melt” and “Cendrillon” plus new favorites like “Catch The Wave”!
  • Endless Customization - Dress Miku and friends from head to toe in over 500 dazzling hairstyles, costumes, and accessories. Costumes can be tailored to every music video, making for endless possibilities.
  • Swap Visual Styles in One Click - Switch between two visual styles for different experiences. Enjoy the pop of the “Mega Mix” style or the gloss of the high-fidelity “Future Tone” style, and change it up anytime.
  • Custom T-Shirt Editor - Let Miku kickstart your fashion designer career on the big stage! Draw your own T-shirt from front to back, then debut it in a performance.
  • Custom Playlists - You’re the director of this concert! Curate a playlist to perfection, hit play, and let the customized music videos roll in this cinematic experience.

Here's a little look at it running directly on a Steam Deck:

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I might be terrible at it but hey it works well and looks great.

Also tested it running just fine on my Fedora 36 desktop, both tested with Proton 7 and no issues encountered. Overall it seems like the Windows port running through Proton is looking really good, so clearly the developer did well and hopefully more will come to PC in future.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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21 comments
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Quoting: elmapulthe only complain that i have is the BYXA, i hope its opitional.
Playstation button prompts work ootb on my machine(with dualsense.) I think the game may even be using steam input automatically, considering it loads a playstation configuration on startup.
I tried to run it on Arch using Proton 7 or Experimental and nothing worked, the errors were DirectX Error - DirectX must be version 11 or later and Windows Version Error - The major version must be 10 or later respectively, I think I'm gonna return it if I don't make it work :/
Liam Dawe 28 May
Quoting: RFSharpe
QuoteNot that I'm any good at it mind you, or that I've ever personally played one in the series before but I tried it for science.

Oh Liam... I bet you are just being modest. For some reason, I have always thought of you as a master of the rhythm game genre. I am thinking that might you might take a break from Deep Rock Galactic and do a Twitch broadcast of your rhythm game skills using Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA Mega Mix+. I bet the viewership for the broadcast would exceptional! I, for one, would definitely be in attendance.
I am sensing some sarcasm here 😅, I’m super bad at timing in such games 🥲
BalkanSpy 28 May
Reminds me of the time I had a Vocaloid phase a long time ago.
WMan22 30 May
Man if this wasn't using Denuvo DRM this would have flown into my game library, but until they remove it I'm just simply happy Project Diva finally has an (official) release on PC for those who don't boycott Denuvo. Probably going to stick with Project Heartbeat once I buy that, though since that doesn't have restrictive DRM as far as I know.
monyarm 30 May
Hope this has the feature from the PSP games (don't know if the vita ones have it), that let's you choose an audio file, and make your own songs for the game, and share them with people. Unfortunately the sites where they were shared are long gone.
flesk 30 May
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Quoting: elmapul
Quoting: scaine
Quoting: elmapulspeaking of hatsune miku, she IS creative commons, the character was made to be used by anyone, so they decided that change her licence to creative commmons was the logical thing to do:
https://creativecommons.org/2012/12/14/hatsune-miku-joins-the-cc-community/
unfortunatelly its non comercial, you need an special licence to do anything comercial with her (wich is kind of a good thing, it may be impossible to make an game with such a quality without some kind of exclusivity of the use of the characters, not to mention they need to licence the song so composers get paid anyway)

considering that miku is creative commons, pairing her with linux make a lot of sense, it was an "crime" an "heresy" that this didnt happen before, but this is finally being fixed.

Well, steady now. It's Deck-ready, but still uses Proton. And it's got Denuvo anti-tamper, so it's a straight no for me. Looks like fun though, and I do enjoy a rhythm game. Might pick it up if they ever remove the anti-tamper.
i forgot to mention that she may be the most famous copyleft character out there...

I think scaine's point here is that the effort invested into "pairing her with linux" in this case is very far away from the point of comparison, namely free software/artwork licenses.

There's a few different ways a game can be made available for Linux:

#1: Game is distributed as free software - Perfect!
#2: Game is proprietary, but has a Linux version - Nice!
#3: Game only has a Windows version, but they take care to make it run well with Proton - Decent.
#4: It coincidentally works with Proton - Well, OK.
#5: It has intrusive DRM, but still somehow works because of a ton of effort made by a third party - Zero f***s given

This game happens to be at the very bottom of this scale.
elmapul 30 May
Quoting: flesk
Quoting: elmapul
Quoting: scaine
Quoting: elmapulspeaking of hatsune miku, she IS creative commons, the character was made to be used by anyone, so they decided that change her licence to creative commmons was the logical thing to do:
https://creativecommons.org/2012/12/14/hatsune-miku-joins-the-cc-community/
unfortunatelly its non comercial, you need an special licence to do anything comercial with her (wich is kind of a good thing, it may be impossible to make an game with such a quality without some kind of exclusivity of the use of the characters, not to mention they need to licence the song so composers get paid anyway)

considering that miku is creative commons, pairing her with linux make a lot of sense, it was an "crime" an "heresy" that this didnt happen before, but this is finally being fixed.

Well, steady now. It's Deck-ready, but still uses Proton. And it's got Denuvo anti-tamper, so it's a straight no for me. Looks like fun though, and I do enjoy a rhythm game. Might pick it up if they ever remove the anti-tamper.
i forgot to mention that she may be the most famous copyleft character out there...

I think scaine's point here is that the effort invested into "pairing her with linux" in this case is very far away from the point of comparison, namely free software/artwork licenses.

There's a few different ways a game can be made available for Linux:

#1: Game is distributed as free software - Perfect!
#2: Game is proprietary, but has a Linux version - Nice!
#3: Game only has a Windows version, but they take care to make it run well with Proton - Decent.
#4: It coincidentally works with Proton - Well, OK.
#5: It has intrusive DRM, but still somehow works because of a ton of effort made by a third party - Zero f***s given

This game happens to be at the very bottom of this scale.

yeah i can understand your pov, but still, we are much better runing an proprietary game on top of an open source operating system, than on top of any proprietary system, especially consoles. people complain about drm on pc, but consoles are basically DRM-Machines, and games may even add they own drm on top of the system level drm from consoles.

people complain about drm on pc but they find an way to get ride of it, and later on when the company realise it was useless they often end up removing it anyway.

now, runing an native version would be ideal but...
there are a few issues with it, sometimes its easier to run the windows version of an old game on linux than the linux native build from the same game on linux, linux has historically an bad trackrecord of keeping backward comp, and no matter how many times we say "its solved now" we cant be sure its really solved until years have passed since the "fix" was done and things are still working.

not to mention that wine will ensure that most of the mods made for windows will also work on linux, and the modding comunity will be much bigger on windows in the short term, there is no way arround it until we fix our marketshare.
flesk 30 May
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Quoting: elmapul
Quoting: flesk
Quoting: elmapul
Quoting: scaine
Quoting: elmapulspeaking of hatsune miku, she IS creative commons, the character was made to be used by anyone, so they decided that change her licence to creative commmons was the logical thing to do:
https://creativecommons.org/2012/12/14/hatsune-miku-joins-the-cc-community/
unfortunatelly its non comercial, you need an special licence to do anything comercial with her (wich is kind of a good thing, it may be impossible to make an game with such a quality without some kind of exclusivity of the use of the characters, not to mention they need to licence the song so composers get paid anyway)

considering that miku is creative commons, pairing her with linux make a lot of sense, it was an "crime" an "heresy" that this didnt happen before, but this is finally being fixed.

Well, steady now. It's Deck-ready, but still uses Proton. And it's got Denuvo anti-tamper, so it's a straight no for me. Looks like fun though, and I do enjoy a rhythm game. Might pick it up if they ever remove the anti-tamper.
i forgot to mention that she may be the most famous copyleft character out there...

I think scaine's point here is that the effort invested into "pairing her with linux" in this case is very far away from the point of comparison, namely free software/artwork licenses.

There's a few different ways a game can be made available for Linux:

#1: Game is distributed as free software - Perfect!
#2: Game is proprietary, but has a Linux version - Nice!
#3: Game only has a Windows version, but they take care to make it run well with Proton - Decent.
#4: It coincidentally works with Proton - Well, OK.
#5: It has intrusive DRM, but still somehow works because of a ton of effort made by a third party - Zero f***s given

This game happens to be at the very bottom of this scale.

yeah i can understand your pov, but still, we are much better runing an proprietary game on top of an open source operating system, than on top of any proprietary system, especially consoles. people complain about drm on pc, but consoles are basically DRM-Machines, and games may even add they own drm on top of the system level drm from consoles.

people complain about drm on pc but they find an way to get ride of it, and later on when the company realise it was useless they often end up removing it anyway.

now, runing an native version would be ideal but...
there are a few issues with it, sometimes its easier to run the windows version of an old game on linux than the linux native build from the same game on linux, linux has historically an bad trackrecord of keeping backward comp, and no matter how many times we say "its solved now" we cant be sure its really solved until years have passed since the "fix" was done and things are still working.

not to mention that wine will ensure that most of the mods made for windows will also work on linux, and the modding comunity will be much bigger on windows in the short term, there is no way arround it until we fix our marketshare.

Yes, those are all valid points in general. I just think they are irrelevant to the point I was making, which is that the developer of the game, specifically, hasn't done anything to be worthy of your praise.
elmapul 31 May
Quoting: flesk
Quoting: elmapul
Quoting: flesk
Quoting: elmapul
Quoting: scaine
Quoting: elmapulspeaking of hatsune miku, she IS creative commons, the character was made to be used by anyone, so they decided that change her licence to creative commmons was the logical thing to do:
https://creativecommons.org/2012/12/14/hatsune-miku-joins-the-cc-community/
unfortunatelly its non comercial, you need an special licence to do anything comercial with her (wich is kind of a good thing, it may be impossible to make an game with such a quality without some kind of exclusivity of the use of the characters, not to mention they need to licence the song so composers get paid anyway)

considering that miku is creative commons, pairing her with linux make a lot of sense, it was an "crime" an "heresy" that this didnt happen before, but this is finally being fixed.

Well, steady now. It's Deck-ready, but still uses Proton. And it's got Denuvo anti-tamper, so it's a straight no for me. Looks like fun though, and I do enjoy a rhythm game. Might pick it up if they ever remove the anti-tamper.
i forgot to mention that she may be the most famous copyleft character out there...

I think scaine's point here is that the effort invested into "pairing her with linux" in this case is very far away from the point of comparison, namely free software/artwork licenses.

There's a few different ways a game can be made available for Linux:

#1: Game is distributed as free software - Perfect!
#2: Game is proprietary, but has a Linux version - Nice!
#3: Game only has a Windows version, but they take care to make it run well with Proton - Decent.
#4: It coincidentally works with Proton - Well, OK.
#5: It has intrusive DRM, but still somehow works because of a ton of effort made by a third party - Zero f***s given

This game happens to be at the very bottom of this scale.

yeah i can understand your pov, but still, we are much better runing an proprietary game on top of an open source operating system, than on top of any proprietary system, especially consoles. people complain about drm on pc, but consoles are basically DRM-Machines, and games may even add they own drm on top of the system level drm from consoles.

people complain about drm on pc but they find an way to get ride of it, and later on when the company realise it was useless they often end up removing it anyway.

now, runing an native version would be ideal but...
there are a few issues with it, sometimes its easier to run the windows version of an old game on linux than the linux native build from the same game on linux, linux has historically an bad trackrecord of keeping backward comp, and no matter how many times we say "its solved now" we cant be sure its really solved until years have passed since the "fix" was done and things are still working.

not to mention that wine will ensure that most of the mods made for windows will also work on linux, and the modding comunity will be much bigger on windows in the short term, there is no way arround it until we fix our marketshare.

Yes, those are all valid points in general. I just think they are irrelevant to the point I was making, which is that the developer of the game, specifically, hasn't done anything to be worthy of your praise.

i understand and agree, its just that, for many years i had this conflict of loving linux, free software, free culture in general (creative commons/copyleft , etc) and loving vocaloid, but pretty much "having to chose" between the two worlds, now i can use linux and play an vocaloid game!

i know its baby steps, we still have to get ride of the drm, make the game run natively and if the sky falls, they might even open source it in the future, we are fair from it ever happening, and i dont think most of this will, but at least i can fund an single ecosystem and get pretty much all i love, instead of buying an proprietary drm-box and having to deal with this strange feeling.

i dont think we will ever see a world where everything is floss, that is a stallman naive dream.
maybe in the future steamOS and other distros grow enough in importance to have native support from most games (i dont think that will happen in the desktop, it will be just like on phones where an linux system is the most used but that dont affect the desktop market at all, we might have the same happening in the console market)

i think in the future we might have an linux console selling as much as an PS2, and even that wont change the market on the desktop an inch, but honestly i dont care that much, so long as i have the software tools i need and the games i want running on linux, i will be satisfied.
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