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Kaspersky release a free Virus Removal Tool for Linux

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Well, this is interesting. Kaspersky have released KVRT (Kaspersky Virus Removal Tool), which is free to use to scan your systems for issues.

This is not an active virus scanner, it doesn't constantly run on your system. Only when you load it and tell it to scan. It also doesn't auto-update, you need to go and download it fresh from their website each time. Still, it's interesting to see such a big name jump into something like this for Linux don't you think? They say it can "detect both malware and adware, as well as legitimate programs that can be used for attacks".


It may look like a Windows application but that really is on Linux.

As they said in their blog post announcement:

Modern-day cybercriminals aren’t ignoring Linux-based operating systems. Recently, we published a series of posts about malicious code in the open source set of utilities XZ Utils, which managed to find its way into several popular Linux builds; wrote about a Linux implant for the DinodasRAT malware — also known as XDealer; and warned about a backdoor in the Trojanized version of Free Download Manager. Despite all this, the myth that Linux is mostly immune to cyberthreats persists: companies rarely devote funds to protecting machines running this operating system. Therefore, we’ve released a dedicated free product that allows you to check Linux computers for modern threats — Kaspersky Virus Removal Tool (KVRT) for Linux.

What are your thoughts on this, and what do you use on your Linux desktop to keep it secure? Maybe it's time to give over some suggestions in the comments on that. 

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Security, Apps, Misc
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
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NeoTheFox Jun 3
I would never advise anyone to run anything that came out of Kaspersky Lab on their machines. Don't forget that Kaspersky lab is directly run by the Russian intelligence service, and it's on the US National Security risk list


Last edited by NeoTheFox on 3 June 2024 at 11:45 am UTC
pb Jun 3
So it removes all viruses which are competition to Russian spyware? ;-)
Quoting: pbSo it removes all viruses which are competition to Russian spyware? ;-)
Nearly all antivrus programs are "protection rackets".
MacAfee has strong connections with ransomware development and includes a cryptominer.
Lenovo is Chinese.
Microsoft is fully embedded in Prism.
Doesn't mean they can't help.
Maybe comments should be disabled since a pattern is already present, but Kaspersky are not doing operating from a country directly or indirectly involved in mass genocide, if we're going to be throwing rocks, remember that we're in a glass house.
amatai Jun 3
It was bound to happen with the recent extension of surface attack on Linux. When software was only installed from the repo, the security was manageable, but with the growing availability of software outside the repo system (from AUR to snap, steam, flatpack, curl foo.sh | sudo, ...), there start to be a market for antivirus. It feels like the end of an era.
QuoteWhat are your thoughts on this, and what do you use on your Linux desktop to keep it secure? Maybe it's time to give over some suggestions in the comments on that.
I use the ClamAV virus scanner, because it's open source.
Qua security measures.
I always first look for programs in apt or compile them myself.
Once in a while I check the active processes.
I use aggressive content blockers in the browser.
I use a webcam cap.
If ssh is included with my distro I remove it.
Usefull for servers not me.

Somtehing I don't do well:
I've done serious effort to give firefox and tor browser full access to my home directory, which they had locked itself out from in fear of compromising my system/


Last edited by LoudTechie on 3 June 2024 at 12:29 pm UTC
Mal Jun 3
  • Supporter
That linux isn't immure to malware and virus is knonwn. That kaspesky is the solution... it's questionable to say the least.

The general advice is to modify your kernel with anything that is not trusted and OSS. Know which repo you add to your apt. That already shuts down the most nasty risks. And we know it well enough... it's the reason why anti cheats refuse to support linux. They cannot spy without some kind of user approval... and they don't want to disclose what kind of spying they do.

Then for the rest (all kind of malicious activities outside kernel that is) it's the same as Windows. Educate your users to not do anything stupid on the web. And to not download snaps and the likes from untrusted sources. Which is easier said that done I suppose. Some antivirus support can definitely help here. But the antivirus itself needs to come from a trusted entity :)
Quoting: amataiIt was bound to happen with the recent extension of surface attack on Linux. When software was only installed from the repo, the security was manageable, but with the growing availability of software outside the repo system (from AUR to snap, steam, flatpack, curl foo.sh | sudo, ...), there start to be a market for antivirus. It feels like the end of an era.
It feels, but isn't there already is a growing market of Linux anti-virus solutions.
Kaspersky is just one of the many.
Most of them are aimed at servers, but they do exist.


Last edited by LoudTechie on 3 June 2024 at 12:31 pm UTC
Drakker Jun 3
At this point, I wouldn't trust anything from the major players in the anti-virus/anti-etc stuff. Way too risky. ClamAV it would be, if I felt any need to scan for viruses.
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