You can sign up to get a daily email of our articles, see the Mailing List page.

Two bits of big news about the Unity game engine to share today, one specifically about Linux and one about the Unity engine as a whole.

Firstly, remember the team at Unity announced back in May that the Unity Editor for Linux was going to be fully supported instead of staying experimental? Well, sadly the release date slipped. Still happening though! In an update to the original blog post announcing it, they said it's been pushed from 2019.3 and so it's now happening in 2020. No exact date or version number for when it happens is being given. When we get more news about the Unity Editor getting a date again to move from experimental to supported, we will let you know.

Why though? Well, that's the other bit of news. Unity 2019.3 is taking quite a bit longer than expected, as they announced today that it's such a big and complex release that they "want to ensure all these tools work well together before the release leaves the beta testing phase". So Unity 2019.3 will fully release sometime in January 2020.

The big thing about Unity 2019.3 for game developers and Linux gamers is that this release will be the first to officially support IL2CPP on Linux which the lack-of has caused issues for some developers. Will be nice to have us back on some more feature parity with the Unity game engine.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
15 Likes
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG and Humble Store. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
The comments on this article are closed.
12 comments
Page: 1/2»
  Go to:

dejaime 12 Dec, 2019
I must say I love the idea of finally having the editor being fully supported on a Linux system. After years using it on windows on my day job, I don't use it anymore, but it still stirs my curiosity with the new features I've missed in the last couple of years.
BrazilianGamer 12 Dec, 2019
The IL2CPP issue has been a big one. Nice to see we'll get rid of it
Nagezahn 12 Dec, 2019
I've tried to get into Unity on Linux some time ago, but I found it not to be very accessible. Later I read a post of someone who said that Unity has an asset-focused approach that does not suit programmers very well, and although I did not dive in very deep, I found that to be true for me. I'm used to and like manipulating objects by code instead of dragging and dropping my way around some state machines which properties and processes I didn't fully understand (and didn't care enough to try harder).

But ever since I laid my hands on Godot I never looked back. It has a really nice integrated scripting language (Unity did not work so well together with MonoDevelop on my system), is all open source and made life much easier for my private 2D game projects.
Doc Angelo 12 Dec, 2019
Godot is just rather simple and clear. Unity seemed really convoluted in comparison.
Swiftpaw 12 Dec, 2019
Quoting: BrazilianGamerThe IL2CPP issue has been a big one. Nice to see we'll get rid of it

Would someone mind explaining what that is and why it's an issue?
Purple Library Guy 13 Dec, 2019
Quoting: Swiftpaw
Quoting: BrazilianGamerThe IL2CPP issue has been a big one. Nice to see we'll get rid of it

Would someone mind explaining what that is and why it's an issue?
I think it has something to do with the Canada Pension Plan.
TheRiddick 13 Dec, 2019
Its a C++ Intermediate language conversion thingo or something.

Anyway once this comes out I might play around with it a bit and test out vulkan support, see why so many developers ignore vulkan when using Unity3d.


Last edited by TheRiddick on 13 December 2019 at 2:40 am UTC
Creak 13 Dec, 2019
Quoting: Swiftpaw
Quoting: BrazilianGamerThe IL2CPP issue has been a big one. Nice to see we'll get rid of it

Would someone mind explaining what that is and why it's an issue?
It is a transpiler that takes the intermediate language (IL) from C# interpreter and convert it to C++ (CPP).

Then the C++ code is compiled to the targeted platform.

The result is a binary that runs faster than if using the .net framework.

Doc: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/IL2CPP.html


Last edited by Creak on 13 December 2019 at 5:03 am UTC
Purple Library Guy 13 Dec, 2019
Quoting: Creak
Quoting: Swiftpaw
Quoting: BrazilianGamerThe IL2CPP issue has been a big one. Nice to see we'll get rid of it

Would someone mind explaining what that is and why it's an issue?
It is a transpiler that takes the intermediate language (IL) from C# interpreter and convert it to C++ (CPP).

Then the C++ code is compiled to the targeted platform.

The result is a binary that runs faster than if using the .net framework.

Doc: https://docs.unity3d.com/Manual/IL2CPP.html
So, a bit like Vala?
Alloc 13 Dec, 2019
Quoting: TheRiddickAnyway once this comes out I might play around with it a bit and test out vulkan support, see why so many developers ignore vulkan when using Unity3d.
Think a lot of that is just legacy shaders they don't want to update. Though it seems like it's really little trouble to get them running in general but sometimes just a matter of adding "vulkan" to the list of supported APIs within each shader :D
Wouldn't see a single reason not to support Vulkan, unlike Metal, which is at least an issue in terms of build management as this requires you to rebuild asset bundles *just* for macOS (thanks Unity for ignoring that issue). Which is even more troublesome when you want modding to come into play :(


Quoting: CreakThen the C++ code is compiled to the targeted platform.

The result is a binary that runs faster than if using the .net framework.
And it's only faster because Unity focuses more on ways to hack around using .NET code (IL2CPP, ECS, etc) instead of finally updating the .NET runtime in use to something more polished like .NET Core. It's mostly a false impression that people think native code *has* to be faster than code for VMs like Java / .NET.

Also, IL2CPP kills one of the big pros that Unity games currently have imho: Easy access to modding, no matter if the dev support it or not :(
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Patreon, Liberapay or PayPal Donation.

This ensures all of our main content remains totally free for everyone with no article paywalls. We also don't have tons of adverts, there's also no tracking and we respect your privacy. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
The comments on this article are closed.