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Trombone Champ is my new favourite rhythm game

By - | Views: 16,146

Discover the mysterious of the Trombiverse in Trombone Champ, a new hilarious rhythm game and absolutely now a clear favourite of mine. Come listen to me destroy it. Note: personal purchase.

Released on Steam on September 16th, the developer says it's "the world's first trombone-based rhythm music game. Unlike most music games, you can freely play any note at any time. You're not just following along with the music, you're actually playing the music".

I came across a lot of noise about it on Twitter, including a Valve developer giving it a go on Steam Deck. I thought it looked and sounded hilarious and so I just had to give this one a go myself with the gyro controls on Steam Deck and it's as completely ridiculous as you might think but it wouldn't take all that much practice to get really good at it I think.

Here's a video of me committing musical murder:

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Game Features:

  • Toot your way through over 20 tracks. The better you play, the more toots you earn!
  • Collect all 50 Tromboner Cards!
  • Baboons on nearly every screen!
  • Improvise and play whatever you want in Freeplay Mode!
  • Uncover the secrets of the Trombiverse and become the True Trombone Champ!
  • Absolutely zero microtransactions!
  • Playable with mouse and keyboard (recommended) or USB controllers (coming after launch)!
  • Appropriate for all ages!

It works great on Steam Deck out of the box and on my Fedora Linux desktop it worked just as well there with Proton 7 using mouse controls. Although for mouse controls, they're inverted by default which felt pretty terrible but thankfully in the settings they do let you put it normal which felt better. Overall though, I had far more fun with it on Steam Deck with gyro than I did on desktop.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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About the author -
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
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20 comments
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const 26 Sep
This replaced Aperture Desk Job as my showoff game for the Deck. It's just instant fun, both playing and looking over the shoulder.
I play even worse then Liam, but who cares?
brokeassben 26 Sep
It's like Liam hates Canada. What did Canada do to you???


Last edited by brokeassben on 26 September 2022 at 12:37 pm UTC
AsciiWolf 26 Sep
  • Supporter Plus
Seems to run great, but sadly another game that has no native port.
Quoting: AsciiWolfSeems to run great, but sadly another game that has no native port.

It's not really a problem today for Linux users, thank you Wine.
Did you try to play old Linux native games?
It's a very difficult task to launch them on recent Linux distributions.
Today it's more easy to launch a Windows game on Linux than an old Linux native game.


Last edited by legluondunet on 26 September 2022 at 4:03 pm UTC
Corben 26 Sep
And there is even a VR mod for it (in the works)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3mzQDQ-iiE


Last edited by Corben on 26 September 2022 at 2:22 pm UTC
anewson 26 Sep
Liam I've contacted the Canadian Embassy in London, you'll be hearing from them shortly.
Quoting: brokeassbenIt's like Liam hates Canada. What did Canada do to you???
Speaking as a Canadian, I quite enjoyed his, um, tribute, to my country.
AsciiWolf 26 Sep
  • Supporter Plus
Quoting: legluondunetDid you try to play old Linux native games?
It's a very difficult task to launch them on recent Linux distributions.
Today it's more easy to launch a Windows game on Linux than an old Linux native game.
It is not that bad. Usually, most of the issues are quite easy to solve. I play UT2004 natively on my Fedora 36, it is an out-of-box experience thanks to Luxtorpeda, but it was not that hard to get working even without using Luxtorpeda or Lutris - just copy new versions of some libs to the UT2004/System directory, then edit one line in UT2004 config file, at least if I remember correctly. Similar "tweaking" is also common on Windows and its gaming community. Sure, backward compatibility of Windows is sadly way better, but many games still need various tweaks and fixes to be able to run properly on latest versions of Windows.
const 26 Sep
Quoting: AsciiWolf
Quoting: legluondunetDid you try to play old Linux native games?
It's a very difficult task to launch them on recent Linux distributions.
Today it's more easy to launch a Windows game on Linux than an old Linux native game.
It is not that bad. Usually, most of the issues are quite easy to solve. I play UT2004 natively on my Fedora 36, it is an out-of-box experience thanks to Luxtorpeda, but it was not that hard to get working even without using Luxtorpeda or Lutris - just copy new versions of some libs to the UT2004/System directory, then edit one line in UT2004 config file, at least if I remember correctly. Similar "tweaking" is also common on Windows and its gaming community. Sure, backward compatibility of Windows is sadly way better, but many games still need various tweaks and fixes to be able to run properly on latest versions of Windows.

It's still an issue and one to project into the future.
If a new native game isn't explicitly build against a Steam Runtime or similar, problems will probably come up at some point since distributions are still not providing a solid platform.
For the moment, I'm quite happy with the native situation. We still see some of these and I'm under the impression, it's back to pre-proton numbers since the SteamDeck is making things happen. Current native releases are mostly very good, because they are done by the actual developers and because these want to. That's a serious plus. To again get big native releases - and this time proper ports that actually do better then wine - SteamOS based devices and their influence on big game engines are our only hope. Let's cross our fingers, but I won't hold my breath. Linux gaming has never shined brighter then now :)


Last edited by const on 26 September 2022 at 6:26 pm UTC
Stop, Liam! My sides can only take so much laughter! 😂 Not at your playing (I certainly wouldn't be any better), just at the entire inherently hilarious concept. It's funny because just this weekend I was idly musing about games being developed for the Deck where its gyroscope would be an important part of the game, and here one is!

Quoting: constThis replaced Aperture Desk Job as my showoff game for the Deck. It's just instant fun, both playing and looking over the shoulder.
I may have to do this.
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