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NVIDIA 520.56.06 driver adds easier NVIDIA NGX updates for Wine / Proton

By - | Views: 30,887

NVIDIA has today released driver version 520.56.06, adding support for NVIDIA RTX 40 series and adding a bunch of new features and fixes for Linux gamers.

New features:

  • Implemented support for over-the-air updates in the Proton and Wine NVIDIA NGX build. This feature is disabled by default and can be enabled by setting the "PROTON_ENABLE_NGX_UPDATER" environment variable to a value of "1".
  • Updated the Vulkan driver so that the following extensions no longer depend on nvidia-uvm.ko being loaded at runtime:
    • VK_KHR_acceleration_structure
    • VK_KHR_deferred_host_operations
    • VK_KHR_ray_query
    • VK_KHR_ray_tracing_pipeline
    • VK_NV_cuda_kernel_launch
    • VK_NV_ray_tracing
    • VK_NV_ray_tracing_motion_blur
    • VK_NVX_binary_import
    • VK_NVX_image_view_handle

Updates:

  • Updated nvidia-installer to allow use of the "--add-this-kernel" feature by non-root users.
  • Updated nvidia-installer to display a more accurate progress bar when building the kernel modules.
  • Updated nvidia-installer to display a warning message if a Vulkan ICD loader is not detected.
  • Reworked nvidia-installer's support for DKMS: the kernel modules will now be optionally registered with DKMS after the installer has already built and installed them on its own. nvidia-installer will now register the kernel modules with DKMS by default when the dkms(8) utility is detected on the system.
  • Added a new CUDA Debugger implementation for Pascal and newer architectures as a part of the driver package: libcudadebugger.so (previously released separately as "CUDA GDB Developer Preview").

Fixes:

  • Fixed a bug in the Vulkan driver which could lead to corruption in geometry and tessellation control shaders.
  • Fixed a regression in 515.76 that caused blank screens and hangs when starting an X server on RTX 30 series GPUs in some configurations where the boot display is connected via HDMI.
  • Fixed a bug where Marvel's Spider-Man Remastered would sometimes crash with Xid 13 errors on Turing and later.

What are your thoughts on this update? Let us know in the comments.

In related news, in case you missed it, there's a new Mesa NVIDIA Vulkan driver in development.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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25 comments
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Xpander Oct 12, 2022
Finally i can ditch the vulkan dev drivers. Seems graphics pipeline library made into it:

xpander@archlinux ~ $ vulkaninfo | grep VK_EXT_graphics_pipeline
VK_EXT_graphics_pipeline_library            : extension revision 1
xpander@archlinux ~ $ nvidia-smi | grep Version
| NVIDIA-SMI 520.56.06    Driver Version: 520.56.06    CUDA Version: 11.8     |



Smooth™ stutterfree gaming ftw!
Mohandevir Oct 12, 2022
Seriously, I come to the saddening realization that I have no hype left for whatever Nvidia does, anymore. Lately, it all feels like a Porsche publicity when I come by Nvidia announcments; something I'll never pay for. Even the "low end" RTX 3050 is too expensive. I feel less and less concerned by Nvidia. Going AMD asap. I already did with my Steam Deck and I will ditch my GTX 1660 Super (my son's Christmas gift). The replacement GPU for my desktop is already ordered (RX 6500 XT).

Sorry, these are my "toughts on this update". This said, I'm happy for those that are still in the Nvidia camp and to those it will benefit.


Last edited by Mohandevir on 12 October 2022 at 3:48 pm UTC
slaapliedje Oct 12, 2022
Quoting: MohandevirSeriously, I come to the saddening realization that I have no hype left for whatever Nvidia does, anymore. Lately, it all feels like a Porsche publicity when I come by Nvidia announcments; something I'll never pay for. Even the "low end" RTX 3050 is too expensive. I feel less and less concerned by Nvidia. Going AMD asap. I already did with my Steam Deck and I will ditch my GTX 1660 Super (my son's Christmas gift). The replacement GPU for my desktop is already ordered (RX 6500 XT).

Sorry, these are my "toughts on this update". This said, I'm happy for those that are still in the Nvidia camp and to those it will benefit.
I have a mix of nVidia and AMD systems. Neither are really the golden child on how to update their drivers. AMD requires kernel updates and using out of band (meaning not the standard repository) mesa libraries (unless you're running a rolling release, neither of these are easy). nVidia usually requires the distribution to keep their packages up to date so that they're easy to install for their users, but the distributions have been generally pretty poor at this.
nomorepain77777 Oct 12, 2022
Where are the Wayland improvements? I've been waiting for them to support Night Light feature for Wayland for a long time. They also don't support NvFBC and VDPAU in Wayland. This is really frustrating. My pain will not end until I switch to AMD or Intel.
Marlock Oct 12, 2022
Quoting: slaapliedjeAMD requires kernel updates and using out of band (meaning not the standard repository) mesa libraries (unless you're running a rolling release, neither of these are easy)
This is a widespread notion but I honestly don't get it...

If we were talking about some cryptic app that only exists in AUR I would be agreeing, but we're talking about Mesa here.

How's adding Kisak's (Stable) Mesa PPA in any way difficult on Ubuntu and derivates?

On Linux Mint (even though it's the anthitesys of rolling release, because it's always based on Ubuntu LTS with a bonus ~6 month delay) we have a GUI for adding PPAs (and even 3rd-party Debian repos) called "Software Sources". It's not out-of-the-box, but it's at least a go-here-paste-this-click-ok do-once-and-forget procedure, so not that hard at all, right?

As for kernels, Linux Mint has a GUI for kernel version management offering whatever is available on kernel.ubuntu.org HWE stack for the Ubuntu LTS version it's based on, and kernel updates also follow through the Update Manager. 3 clicks will move you over the newest branch available then normal updates will keep it at the last revision.

On Ubuntu itself this is AFAIK a bit less friendly, but there is UKUU (3rd-party app) to cover the GUI-based kernel management gap and this even supports vanilla kernel.org releases, branch auto-upgrades, etc. There are other similar-purpose apps too, and they work across Ubuntu derivates as well.
Marlock Oct 12, 2022
More on the post topic, I'm really glad Nvidia caved for opensourcing parts of their driver (however long it it might take to happen) and started paying its technical debt of linux features that should work but don't because of their proprietary spaghetti-code driver

AMD and Intel obviously helped this happen because of their choice to support opensource driver stacks, but in a way I feel Valve also needs to be deeply thanked for this, as AMD alone hasn't picked up the pace (and probably wouldn't) until our linux gaming development patron came around and comissioned everyone to work on everything:
The Linux Kernel and Mesa themselves
RADV
ACO
DXVK
VKD3D
Zync
GameScope
Steam Deck using an AMD APU
...

I'll be waiting with past and current AMD (and maybe soon Intel) GPUs and APUs while they get up-to-speed


Last edited by Marlock on 12 October 2022 at 5:19 pm UTC
rcrit Oct 12, 2022
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Quoting: MarlockThis is a widespread notion but I honestly don't get it...

If we were talking about some cryptic app that only exists in AUR I would be agreeing, but we're talking about Mesa here.

How's adding Kisak's (Stable) Mesa PPA in any way difficult on Ubuntu and derivates?

What about for non-Ubuntu and derivatives?

Consider that it may be a widespread notion because it is true (I don't know). Average users may find it difficult either way, either because they don't know how or they don't know what they don't know.
MercifulBoss Oct 12, 2022
No wayland improvements? Shame. Was hoping for wayland to finally be "fixed" (or should I say implemented) on nvidia.
mr-victory Oct 12, 2022
"missing endbr" (the issue which needs ibt=off kernel parameter to fix) still not fixed.
https://github.com/NVIDIA/open-gpu-kernel-modules/issues/256
Purple Library Guy Oct 12, 2022
Quoting: rcrit
Quoting: MarlockThis is a widespread notion but I honestly don't get it...

If we were talking about some cryptic app that only exists in AUR I would be agreeing, but we're talking about Mesa here.

How's adding Kisak's (Stable) Mesa PPA in any way difficult on Ubuntu and derivates?

What about for non-Ubuntu and derivatives?
So, you're saying it might be true of distros that are neither rolling release and/or Arch derivatives, nor Ubuntu and derivatives?
Are there distros that are intended for ease of use that also don't fit either of those baskets?
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