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Today, AMD announced when you will be able to get your hands on their third-generation Threadripper processors if you're after a crazy amount of cores. On top of a new 16 core flagship Ryzen 9.

First up, we have the third-generation Threadripper on the also new sTRX4 socket if you've got plenty of cash and you want a serious upgrade. AMD said that while the pin count is the same as the previous generation Threadripper, "the mapping of those pins to voltage or data will be different this time 'round" so you cannot use a third-gen Threadripper in an older socket or a previous generation in the new sTRX4 socket. Here's what the models are:

Ryzen Threadripper 3960X

  • 24 cores/48 threads
  • 3.8ghz base/4.5ghz boost
  • 140mb cache
  • Price around $1,399.

Ryzen Threadripper 3970X

  • 32 cores/64 threads
  • 3.7ghz base/4.5ghz boost
  • 144mb cache
  • Price around $1,999.

Both of which have a TDP of 280w and they go on sale on November 25. Read more about them here and you can also see their announcement video below:

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As for their new flagship consumer CPU with the AMD Ryzen 9 3950X that releases on November 25 for around $749. With 16 cores and 32 threads, it's going to pack a punch for whatever you're doing.

That's not all, they also have the lower end Athlon 3000G processor releasing on November 19 for $49. They said it's the first Zen-based Athlon processor that's unlocked, giving you some headroom for overclocking it. It also has Radeon Vega 3 Graphics, so it might be quite a good budget gaming processor.

On top of that, they shared a little more information about a new AGESA update that has now been sent onto manufacturers this month focused primarily on stability. More on the 3950X, Athlon 3000G and the AGESA update here.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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21 comments
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tuubi 7 November 2019 at 6:06 pm UTC
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DedaleWhat i wonder is if the 3950X will work with not too expensive cards like the ones with B450 chipsets. Somewhere else i read a lot of people satisfied by their 3700X + B450 or X470 motherboard. Sometimes even with a 3900X.
Pretty much the only notable difference is PCI Express 4.0 support, which might or might not be worth it to you. I got a X470 board myself and used some of the cash I saved on better RAM.
Mohandevir 7 November 2019 at 6:14 pm UTC
Just in time for my Gigabyte B450 i Pro Wifi motherboard that I received few minutes ago... Going to put a Ryzen 5 3600 on it... Thanks! I feel miserable now! Lol!


Last edited by Mohandevir on 7 November 2019 at 6:23 pm UTC
Shmerl 7 November 2019 at 7:27 pm UTC
I suppose going from 12 cores of 3900X to 16 cores of 3950X is a nice bump, but the price increase is disproportional. $500 vs $750.

3900X is already quite a beast. Linux kernel compiles in it in just 6.5 minutes or so.


Last edited by Shmerl on 7 November 2019 at 7:28 pm UTC
Dedale 7 November 2019 at 7:29 pm UTC
Especially for us EU folks. It won't be at 675 € !
minidou 7 November 2019 at 9:21 pm UTC
DedaleEspecially for us EU folks. It won't be at 675 € !

Yes, that's the current price of the few 3900X remaining. It probably won't be available before 2020 either.
14 8 November 2019 at 12:50 am UTC
Dunc
Liam Dawe
poke86Yeah but think of how much you'd save on your heating bill...
I've got an FX 8-Core behind me for that
You joke, but I don't have any “proper” heating in the room with my 6-core FX. And it's not just naturally warm; I definitely notice the difference at this time of year if it hasn't been running.

Gotta say though, I'd love a Ryzen. But this thing has run everything I've thrown at it so far well enough.
6300? You might not just know what you're missing. I got like 20-30 FPS increase in F1 2017 when I upgraded my processor, and that made a big difference from like 40 to 70-ish framerates. My previous processor was i5 3570K.
Geppeto35 8 November 2019 at 7:55 am UTC
I will work on the last one 4 sure next year at work (writing from a 40 threads - 20 cores intel). Incredible (cheap 'n efficient) stuff to run maths and simulations (parallelized of course). From my point of view, not for gaming at home. But for working, dat rules. Would ease my life to work every days on the 128 threads without clearing funds of my lab

Edit: yeah, forgot to say that we have a tower with a threadripper 32 cores on debian: congruent with phoronix results, with the same number of cores and same frequency, it destroys time to compute same maths from a xeon intel of the same generation under debian (and those maths run faster on debian *near a factor 1.8* than under windows 10*)


Last edited by Geppeto35 on 8 November 2019 at 7:58 am UTC
Eike 8 November 2019 at 9:42 am UTC
146300? You might not just know what you're missing. I got like 20-30 FPS increase in F1 2017 when I upgraded my processor, and that made a big difference from like 40 to 70-ish framerates. My previous processor was i5 3570K.

I'm planning to upgrade my i3570K to a Ryzen 6 or 8 core soon. Just feels a bid odd, minding the lack of big productions natively available for Linux...
14 8 November 2019 at 2:27 pm UTC
Eike
146300? You might not just know what you're missing. I got like 20-30 FPS increase in F1 2017 when I upgraded my processor, and that made a big difference from like 40 to 70-ish framerates. My previous processor was i5 3570K.

I'm planning to upgrade my i3570K to a Ryzen 6 or 8 core soon. Just feels a bid odd, minding the lack of big productions natively available for Linux...
Agree. There are a lot of games with middle-of-the-road or even pixel graphics natively on Linux, and you don't need an upgrade for those. Still, there were a handful of games that my last processor were holding me back more than I expected. I stream and watch my friends' streams at the same time. That was really where I was feeling it the most. I had been using two computers. The CPU upgrade allowed me to drop down to one. Besides that, I clearly remember Dota 2 and F1 2017 and Rust getting noticeably faster.
Dunc 8 November 2019 at 6:43 pm UTC
146300? You might not just know what you're missing. I got like 20-30 FPS increase in F1 2017 when I upgraded my processor, and that made a big difference from like 40 to 70-ish framerates. My previous processor was i5 3570K.
I don't doubt it. But that would mean both a CPU and motherboard upgrade, and that's just not within my budget right now. In fact, if I hadn't scored the 6300 for free, I'd probably still be plugging away with my old 4100.

The point is that it's not something that's especially bothering me at the moment. I'm sure I could get something better but... eh, it's okay for now.
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