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Armello, the really fun fairy-tale digital board game had a huge upgrade

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Armello is a digital board game from League of Geeks with a grim setting that's really damn fun to play and this latest update is a pretty big one.

Firstly, for those who play it online you can rejoice at the fact that it finally has an option to reconnect if you're connection decides to die on you for a moment. Crazy it didn't have it until now but there you are.

Another big feature is the ability to level up each hero, giving you more progression and this system works in both single-player and online play. I love that it's not forcing you to play online! The game also looks better than ever, with all cards you play now rendered in 3D.

They also overhauled the menu and hero selection, made setting up a party to play with others easier and more. It's such a big upgrade it even got a trailer:

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There's lots of other smaller changes too, so take a look at the full patch notes found here.

I've played it numerous times, racking up tons of hours attempting to become King. It's probably one of my favourite digital board games in all honesty. It's not easy and there's a healthy dose of randomness to it so it does certainly keep you thinking to plan your next move. There's a healthy amount of depth to it too, with a prologue tutorial that does well at easing you into it.

It's still quite popular too, with over a thousand people playing it regularly.

You can grab it from Humble Store and Steam.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
6 Likes, Who?
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Klaas 28 February 2019 at 12:41 pm UTC
Is this the micro-transactions game that was removed from GOG because the developer couldn't sell them without DRM?
Avehicle7887 28 February 2019 at 1:01 pm UTC
KlaasIs this the micro-transactions game that was removed from GOG because the developer couldn't sell them without DRM?

Yup, that very same game. It was also one of those games some GOG users were happy to see it gone.
Ehvis 28 February 2019 at 1:08 pm UTC
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Avehicle7887
KlaasIs this the micro-transactions game that was removed from GOG because the developer couldn't sell them without DRM?

Yup, that very same game. It was also one of those games some GOG users were happy to see it gone.

This was the one example that demonstrated that an abiding by an overly strict definition of DRM free actually hurts customers. Don't recall any others, but I doubt most games with similar problems would even try to get on gog.
ixnari 28 February 2019 at 2:30 pm UTC
EhvisThis was the one example that demonstrated that an abiding by an overly strict definition of DRM free actually hurts customers. Don't recall any others, but I doubt most games with similar problems would even try to get on gog.

I respectfully disagree. This situation in particular had less to do with following strict DRM free guidelines and more to do with the developers, League of Geeks, using bait and switch tactics and not being transparent with their customers.

If you heard all of this before, I apologize, but just to recap: Their kickstarter page promised a DRM free version and when Armello came out, it released on both Steam and GOG without any distinction being made between the two versions. It was only later, that LoG renamed the GOG to "Armello DRM Free edition". At the same time LoG the released the first DLC for their game, Usurpers, which only released on Steam. This was accompanied by a blog post stating that the DLC will not be coming to GOG, as they would have to rewrite a lot of the game's underlying architecture to make it work on GOG.

This was met with much derision as the news of this troubling development came out of nowhere and by that point many people had already bought Armello on GOG, which was now an inferior version compared to the Steam release.

In my opinion, had this issue been made clear earlier, on Kickstarter for example, the backlash would not have been as severe. This was simply another example of the developers underestimating their workload and not communicating the issues they were having to their paying customers.
liamdawe 28 February 2019 at 3:05 pm UTC
I agree the situation wasn't good with what happened with the GOG release of Armello and we still don't know the real story behind what happened. It's no longer available to buy on GOG (and it's certainly not the only game to be removed from GOG).

GOG certainly do have some issues especially for Linux gamers with no Galaxy, late updates, no API for Linux relying on manual FTP uploads and so on. However, plenty of games do have DLC on GOG so I still to this day find their explanations a bit off about it all.

I like what GOG do a lot and I like Armello a lot too, the situation sucks for GOG customers but I don't let that stop me enjoying a genuinely good game on Linux on a different store.
14 28 February 2019 at 3:14 pm UTC
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Just adding my two cents that I really like Armello. Since my wife is not very drawn to computer games and I don't like to play it by myself, I have only played it about half a dozen times. My gaming buddies are never very excited to play a game where you take turns.
Schattenspiegel 28 February 2019 at 5:19 pm UTC
Just got my feet wet with the first two mp matches: the game is maybe a little slow for my taste in mp(4players taking turns) but quite a bit of fun and the turn timers are well set. What makes it great is the comeback potential and the pure nastiness of the actions you can pull. ;-)
Salvatos 28 February 2019 at 6:35 pm UTC
I never managed to fully get into Armello because on one hand I got bored waiting on all opponents to take their turns (even though I generally like turn-based tactics games) yet on the other hand I always felt like things were moving too fast on screen and I couldn't really keep up with every card being played and its effects. Kind of a worst of both worlds situation. Very well designed overall, though, and I would probably enjoy a tabletop version more.
Ehvis 28 February 2019 at 7:13 pm UTC
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ixnariI respectfully disagree. This situation in particular had less to do with following strict DRM free guidelines and more to do with the developers, League of Geeks, using bait and switch tactics and not being transparent with their customers.

I don't really know all the details for this particular game as it doesn't really interest me. But the general problem is still a real one. Many DLCs from multiplayer games are essentially just an authentication code because all the content is already included in the base game. If a store is not willing to sell these authentication code dlcs, then the only alternative is to remove the content from the base game and with that the ability to play with it against non-dlc owners. Anything after that is bound to be bad for owners. Although technically DRM, I don't think these DLC should be counted as such as long as they can be installed and used offline (even though the game may be useless offline).
TheSyldat 2 March 2019 at 2:46 pm UTC
Ehvis
ixnariI respectfully disagree. This situation in particular had less to do with following strict DRM free guidelines and more to do with the developers, League of Geeks, using bait and switch tactics and not being transparent with their customers.

I don't really know all the details for this particular game as it doesn't really interest me. But the general problem is still a real one. Many DLCs from multiplayer games are essentially just an authentication code because all the content is already included in the base game. If a store is not willing to sell these authentication code dlcs, then the only alternative is to remove the content from the base game and with that the ability to play with it against non-dlc owners. Anything after that is bound to be bad for owners. Although technically DRM, I don't think these DLC should be counted as such as long as they can be installed and used offline (even though the game may be useless offline).
No really you don't understand here the game is more and more as it evolves turning into a game as a service type of deal and it's not just new characters it's cosmetics and shit . And well GOG just isn't game for anything remotely containing in app purchases . Which Armello does contain.

Maybe one day GOG will change policy but on their community stream they have been real clear about that multiple times , what made the all thing fell through is that no matter what LoG proposed to GOG they just didn't wanted any game with in app purchases on their store ...


Last edited by TheSyldat at 2 March 2019 at 2:47 pm UTC
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