You can sign up to get a daily email of our articles, see the Mailing List page!

Discord announce their Linux client is now officially supported and out of beta

Posted by , | Views: 14,273

Discord, the insanely popular chat and VOIP client primarily aimed at gamers is now officially supported on Linux and out of beta.

Be sure to join our Discord channel to hook up with everyone: https://discord.gg/0rxBtcSOonvGzXr4

Stoked to announce our super sick app for LINUX. Chris was massaging this for ages but it's like super sick now https://t.co/hQtQpZO95c pic.twitter.com/lVyDkBD3cN

— Discord (@discordapp) January 11, 2017


Download it here. It provides either a .deb or a .tar.gz and you need to be 64bit to use it.

Personally, I think it's great. You don't actually need a client to use it, as you can use it directly in the browser which makes it rather useful.

I've seen people worried about their terms and conditions, with it stating that by using it you grant rights to your content to the parent Company. To make it clear, this is no different to Reddit, Facebook and almost every site/application that you put content into.

 

 

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
11 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more information here.
About the author -
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
The comments on this article are closed.
37 comments
Page: «4/4
  Go to:

Nanobang 15 January 2017 at 4:19 pm UTC
14
PicoboomI don't need people telling me to use open-source software, I need open-source people telling people like me --- normal, non-technically-minded people --- how to use their software. Until then I'll make do with what tools are avalable to me.
If your cry for help is serious, I can probably write short instructions for you to run a Murmur server if you know how to install Linux. Murmur is one of the easiest things to host. Maintenance of the server can be set up to be mostly automatic as well. The process of doing so is pretty short.

It is indeed. And if you are able to write clear, specific, step-by-step instructions for setting up a mumble server, then you would be helping not only me but the entire Linux community. There simply isn't enough of this sort of how-to being written by knowledgeable people for beginners and average users.

So yes, I am quite, quite serious. And thank you for stepping up and offering to help.
Doc Angelo 16 January 2017 at 12:40 pm UTC
What kind of guide is needed? A guide for installing Murmur on a local machine (home server or your gaming desktop), or on a rented server with full access? There are also many hosters who are offering servers for Mumble. https://wiki.mumble.info/wiki/Hosters
Nanobang 16 January 2017 at 3:36 pm UTC
Doc AngeloWhat kind of guide is needed? A guide for installing Murmur on a local machine (home server or your gaming desktop), or on a rented server with full access? There are also many hosters who are offering servers for Mumble. https://wiki.mumble.info/wiki/Hosters

It's less a matter of "what kind?" than "which one first?" And I would imagine that beginning and average Linux users would be most likely to be using a solitary desktop to game on, for starters.

I'm glad you mentioned "hosters." Thanks for posting that link. I personally don't team game with anything like the kind of regularity that would push me to pay for a hosting service. Scanning the list, and discounting the invalid links and non-english services, I'm left with guildbit, which is exactly the sort of site that beginners and average users need: Simple and jargon-free. Is it secure? I couldn't say. But if Mumble and Murmer were rolled into a client that offered guildbit level user-friendliness, I wouldn't be writing any of this. I'd be using it.

Guildbit accolades aside, the home-desktop gaming crowd needs simple instructions to set up a server if they are going to use M&M, I think.
tuubi 16 January 2017 at 4:47 pm UTC
View PC info
  • Supporter
Anyone know about bandwidth requirements for a murmur server?
14 17 January 2017 at 2:36 am UTC
Using a Debian server, here is how you install Murmur:
apt-get install mumble-server
systemctl enable mumble-server


Keep your system updated with security patches automatically:
apt-get install unattended-upgrades
vim /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/20auto-upgrades

Make sure the contents are thus:
APT::Periodic::Update-Package-Lists "10";
APT::Periodic::Unattended-Upgrade "1";
APT::Periodic::Download-Upgradeable-Packages "10";
APT::Periodic::AutocleanInterval "30";


When you're ready to go live, open ports 64738 (TCP and UDP) to your server's IP address.

Every now and then, like every month or two, you should log into the server and run:
apt-get update && apt-get upgrade
Once it's done, if you notice a new kernel installed, you should reboot the server.

Want to dig in more? There is a config file at /etc/mumble-server.ini. It's fine to run at defaults if you don't want to go through the file.
If you need help with networking, like NAT or dynamic public IP or DNS issues, let me know.
Doc Angelo 17 January 2017 at 10:01 am UTC
PicoboomScanning the list, and discounting the invalid links and non-english services, I'm left with guildbit, which is exactly the sort of site that beginners and average users need: Simple and jargon-free. Is it secure? I couldn't say. But if Mumble and Murmer were rolled into a client that offered guildbit level user-friendliness, I wouldn't be writing any of this. I'd be using it.

Yeah, that site is cool. Just fire it up, tell your friends the address, and there you go. About the security of such sites: You can't know. It's best practice to assume your data isn't safe, if you are not in control of the hardware. But I don't think there's any big data kraken behind it, it's a rather small site.

PicoboomGuildbit accolades aside, the home-desktop gaming crowd needs simple instructions to set up a server if they are going to use M&M, I think.

You are right. There is no easy way for regular users to get Murmur running. But even then, you have the problem that you would have to tell your friends your new IP every day, except you have a Dynamic DNS account and configured it with your hardware. Yet another thing that is absolutely not common to do or know (how to) for the regular user.

It would be nice to have a single and portable executable file (murmur.appimage), that you just fire up and you're done. For that to work without Dynamic DNS, there would need to be a master server that just tells clients where to find a certain Murmur server - nothing more. The actual communication does not run over this master server. Syncthing is doing it like this.

There are many guides how to set up DDNS, and there are many guides how to set up Murmur. But none of them match what the regular user needs. I think it has to be done in software, just like you suggested. Hm...
Nanobang 17 January 2017 at 1:42 pm UTC
Doc AngeloYou are right. There is no easy way for regular users to get Murmur running. But even then, you have the problem that you would have to tell your friends your new IP every day, except you have a Dynamic DNS account and configured it with your hardware. Yet another thing that is absolutely not common to do or know (how to) for the regular user.

It would be nice to have a single and portable executable file (murmur.appimage), that you just fire up and you're done. For that to work without Dynamic DNS, there would need to be a master server that just tells clients where to find a certain Murmur server - nothing more. The actual communication does not run over this master server. Syncthing is doing it like this.

There are many guides how to set up DDNS, and there are many guides how to set up Murmur. But none of them match what the regular user needs. I think it has to be done in software, just like you suggested. Hm...

It's clear you absolutely get what I"m talking about, and I can't tell you how nice that is. You see not only the gaps in the knowledge of beginning and average users, but the way problems ripple out from those gaps. It all becomes very complicated very fast for the likes of us. If M&M (and perhaps Linux itself) is ever going to reach a wider audience, I feel it will take folks like you, who can see the problems and imagine solutions, that will get it there.
  Go to:
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on Patreon, Liberapay or Paypal. We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
Livestreams & Videos
None currently, submit yours here!
See more!
Popular this week
View by Category
Contact
Latest Comments
Latest Forum Posts