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For those interested in trying out Google Stadia, the new streaming service, today Google held their first Stadia Connect to give out some details. Quick reminder: Stadia is the game streaming service powered by Debian Linux and Vulkan. It’s supposed to offer a “single click” experience with “no downloading required”.

On the subject of pricing: They will have a Stadia Pro subscription at $9.99/£8.99 a month which gives you up to 4K resolution with regular free games and discounts. They will also do Stadia Base with no monthly sub that will come "next year" limiting you to 1080p, both allowing you to buy games whenever you want.

However, it seems only those who purchase the special Founders Edition will get access sometime in November. This includes first access to Stadia, a Chromecast Ultra, limited edition Stadia Controller, 3 months of Stadia Pro, a guest pass to give access to a friend and the Complete Edition of Destiny 2.

First set of games includes: Baldur’s Gate III (Larian Studios) was newly announced - Trailer, Ghost Recon Breakpoint, Gylt, Get Packed, The Division 2, Destiny 2, DOOM Eternal, Football Manager 2020, GRID, Metro Exodus, The Elder Scrolls Online, Assassin's Creed Odyssey, Tomb Raider Trilogy, Borderlands 3 and more.

A pretty interesting line-up and there’s more they’re going to announce later, that’s just all they’re teasing for now. They also reiterated wide support for different game pads, not just their own.

You can see the video here:

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If you want to play at 1080p, Google are saying you will need a 20Mbps connection. That actually seems quite low, but even so the bandwidth use that will come along with it will likely be massive. If your connection is a bit wobbly, Stadia will keep your progress for "several minutes".

As for availability, they're launching in Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, USA and the United Kingdom. They say more countries will come in 2020 too.

See more at the official Stadia website and their FAQ here.

I found it quite amusing that the video kept dying on me (seems for others too), after Google's recent outage it doesn't exactly fill me with confidence about buying AAA titles to stream them through Google's network.

I remain unconvinced by it, especially now we know we will be buying games as well and you're locked to 1080p unless you also pay a monthly subscription. Buying a game, to have no real access to it with Google controlling every part of it? I mentioned before I didn't particularly like the idea of even less ownership but with a Netflix-like subscription model it might have made more sense but not if you're still paying full price.

I will add more details as I look over it all.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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134 comments
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liamdawe 7 June 2019 at 1:06 pm UTC
MohandevirNot going to say that you are wrong. I totally understand your point of view. But let me be the Devil's advocate, for a minute...

liamdaweIt's not free in any form:
Base Stadia - You buy the games.

It depends on the pricing of each games and the conditions, imo. Will they be ours forever, like Steam, even if it's not sold anymore, or are these games exposed to disapearing from the store like the Netflix model? We have no clues about these aspects, yet. Personnally I expected a subscription plan, similar to Netflix, even for the base option. To me it still an interresting option.

liamdaweStadia Pro - You pay monthly, you buy games, you get few select free.

It compares to PS Plus and Xbox pass which are popular options. It's not a new formula and it's much better thant I expected it to be. This said, probably not my bag.

liamdaweAlso, "unfair" about paying and not having any real access to the files, what's fair about it?
Google has issues? No game.
Your net has issues? No game.

This can be replaced by: "Motherboard failure ($$$), no games, HDD failure ($$), no games, GPU failure($$$$), no games, RAM failure($), no games... Want me to go on? It's all about managing the risks. Both point of view are valid.

liamdaweModding? Haha no.

I don't think Stadia is targeted to the 1% techy educated market share that we represent or even the hardcore gamers that mods, which, I suspect, is not the vast majority. It probably has more appeal to the Xbox and Playstation players or the Windows users that have stopped gaming because of an ageing computer and/or are due for an hardware upgrade.

Personnally I see it as a complement to my Linux rig, for games that will never be playable on my Desktop, because there will be. You know "Stadia Games and Entertainment" produced games?
For buying games, it sound very much like you buy them and keep them, not a Netflix model, that seems pretty clear to me. Otherwise, you're not buying you're renting.

Okay, now you're starting to get me to think more on it. I never even thought about components breaking down, leaving you out of playing your games. Now that's a very valid point worth something.
Ehvis 7 June 2019 at 1:07 pm UTC
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MohandevirIt depends on the pricing of each games and the conditions, imo. Will they be ours forever, like Steam, even if it's not sold anymore, or are these games exposed to disapearing from the store like the Netflix model?

Kind of irrelevant in this. If Stadia stops supporting it, it becomes useless since you can't run it anywhere else. Which is the major problem with purchases for a service like this. Unless the price of games is so low that you would accept a throw-away purchase, this is a real deal breaker.
Mohandevir 7 June 2019 at 1:28 pm UTC
EhvisIf Stadia stops supporting it

That's my whole point. We don't know. There are still missing pieces in the puzzle. If they plan to stop supporting games, I hope, at least, that prices will be lower, like renting. Either way, it makes it much less interresting. That's obvious.

Or you meant if Google stops supporting Stadia? Well... Just like in the old days, when a PS, PS2 broke down and you couldn't buy an new one. Game Library gone. The PC gamers are lucky, in that aspect.

This said, if Stadia is a success, there is no reason to stop supporting it. Google+ was shutdown because nobody used it anymore. If Stadia is a failure, who will it hurt? It's going to die in general indifference, like the other projects Google killed. That's the catch 22 I was referring to in a previous post. Imo, it's not a valid argument.

Thinking about it, what could happen, is a change in the conditions (free being not free anymore & price raise on the Pro subscription) because infra costs skyrockets (example). This could make a user reconsider Stadia and eventually make Goodle reconsider the whole thing. But again, it will have become a failure by then.

Edit: Sorry for all the edits.


Last edited by Mohandevir at 7 June 2019 at 1:49 pm UTC
eldaking 7 June 2019 at 1:52 pm UTC
ShmerlI think complex simulation should be the real benefit of cloud gaming. Pushing more pixels per second? Local PC hardware handles that better and better every year. How much photorealism do we really need? At some point we won't see any difference, while server clusters is an overkill for that purpose.

And this heavy bend on graphics is really weird, given how many interesting things in gaming are underdeveloped. Strategy is more straightforward sure, but imagine something more complicated. Such as simulating climate, or a biological ecosystem, or simulating NPC behavior not based on predefined scripts, but on their self learning driven by in-game interactions. It's surprising these kind of ideas aren't yet applied more widely in gaming, with all this push for the cloud.

I personally agree very, very much. There is so much that could be done, and what is actually done (graphics-wise) sometimes is so meaningless. But the market is weird.

And frankly, more complex simulations don't always result in differences we can see. There are interesting possibilities, but in a sense people approach simulation in a much more logical way than graphics - with sensible trade-offs between performance and complexity and considerations between how much that impacts actual enjoyment of the game...
tonR 7 June 2019 at 2:00 pm UTC
I taking 'wait and see' approach. For me, anything streaming (heck even Spotify) needs constant and reliable network, which is impossible to get either one (and sometimes even both), anywhere in or near my area.

If Google have solution for both issue, probably I tempted to try it. If not, I'm stick with Steam and itch (or go on "sailing" if I'm totally desperate).
Mohandevir 7 June 2019 at 2:28 pm UTC
From Kotaku:

"Google says it’ll be one user per Stadia account, tied to your Google ID—you can have a guest account for splitscreen, but other than that, no sharing. (Update (2:43pm): A Google spokesperson reached out to say that family sharing is coming in the future.)"

Source:
https://kotaku.com/everything-we-learned-today-about-google-stadia-update-1835294433

Bold on me. I like Steam family sharing pretty much.


Last edited by Mohandevir at 7 June 2019 at 2:29 pm UTC
Purple Library Guy 7 June 2019 at 2:32 pm UTC
Smoke39
hardpenguinI think it is also unfair to keep repeating how not having access to the game files is a drawback. What about the upsides of this solution? There is no download and installation time, you can seamlessly switch between devices without stopping the gaming session and you do not have to own a gaming PC or a gaming console that is capable of running the game. And one more for us, Linux fans - you do not have to deal with the Windows 10 bullshit
But... it is a drawback, and not even a necessary one to have those benefits.
Not necessary I guess, but if they're going to let you buy it they have to have a version for whatever platform you're on because most of their customers probably aren't running Stadia Linux stuff on their devices. Having a store-as-such makes the project a lot more complicated in an area where they don't have expertise.
Arehandoro 7 June 2019 at 2:54 pm UTC
Mohandevir
EhvisIf Stadia stops supporting it

Or you meant if Google stops supporting Stadia? Well... Just like in the old days, when a PS, PS2 broke down and you couldn't buy an new one. Game Library gone. The PC gamers are lucky, in that aspect.

In that regard it would not be much different than if Valve stops supporting Steam. Aside of the games that can be played outside of the client, all the rest would be just digital garbage.
wvstolzing 7 June 2019 at 3:07 pm UTC
Arehandoro
Mohandevir
EhvisIf Stadia stops supporting it

Or you meant if Google stops supporting Stadia? Well... Just like in the old days, when a PS, PS2 broke down and you couldn't buy an new one. Game Library gone. The PC gamers are lucky, in that aspect.

In that regard it would not be much different than if Valve stops supporting Steam. Aside of the games that can be played outside of the client, all the rest would be just digital garbage.

The latter comparison (Steam-Stadia) is a bit more on point; but the PS2 comparison hardly works at all. Google 'stopping support' for Stadia would correspond to the *possibility* of running anything on a PS2 going away, which entails i) every PS2 in the world evaporating; ii) every copy of every game disappearing so it can't be emulated (or its becoming impossible that an emulator should be developed by reverse engineering).

If your PS2 broke, and you couldn't afford to get a new console, you could still hold on to your games to play them at your friend's house; or save up to get a used PS2 in 2 years; or wait 10 years so an accurate emulator shows up. When something like Stadia 'breaks', you have none of those possibilities.

Even with Steam: As long as you have the downloaded files, you could try cracking them to get around the DRM. Again, no such *possibility* on Stadia.
wvstolzing 7 June 2019 at 3:14 pm UTC
Purple Library Guy... but if they're going to let you buy it they have to have a version for whatever platform you're on because most of their customers probably aren't running Stadia Linux stuff on their devices. Having a store-as-such makes the project a lot more complicated in an area where they don't have expertise.

This is confusing; no one except Google will be running 'Stadio Linux stuff on their devices', there's no such OS -- or even application -- for the end user to run. All the user has is a browser window into the 'service'.
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