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New World Interactive have released a news post going over the state of Insurgency: Sandstorm, along with announcing a bunch of features no longer being made.

To cut right to the chase here's what's not going to be added into Insurgency: Sandstorm:

  • Story mode/Campaign
  • Mac Support
  • Linux Support
  • Local Play on PvP modes
  • Weapons on Back
  • New foregrip upgrade options

Why? Apparently nothing in that list makes "business sense". They did expand on this a little:

We did not take this decision-making process lightly; all nominated cuts have been reviewed, re-reviewed, and discussed numerous times internally. At the end of these discussions, our criteria came down to “Does this proposed content present a reasonable business case in exchange for the additional development time required to deliver these features?” and in these cases, the answer was “No.” We recognize that these were things that, at some point or another, were promised by the studio, and we apologize for mismanaging expectations. Moving forward, we will be more deliberate in our messaging and our commitments to our players. We’ve grown a lot with Insurgency: Sandstorm, and we’ve learned a lot throughout that process. These lessons will make up our future projects going forward.

New World Interactive

This is a real shame, after Insurgency: Sandstorm was originally announced back in 2016 with Linux support and a story mode it really did look exciting but New World Interactive gradually cut back on what it would contain. Still, we patiently waited only to be repeatedly let down here.

In August last year Linux was planned in the first couple updates, moving into January this year they said they were working on it and hoped to have it out this year, then in May this year they still claimed they were "committed" to Linux and macOS and then again in June they said they would likely push out a Beta version first which would happen next year. Now it's not happening at all—ouch.

Of course, this is a reminder not to buy a game before it lands on Linux. Especially a multiplayer title that relies on anti-cheat. Even if you're perfectly fine using Steam Play/Proton for everything, anti-cheat support is still likely a long way off. Support developers that support the platform. Spend your monies wisely.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: FPS, Steam
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Purple Library Guy 11 Dec, 2019
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: EikeThe trouble with both tactics, "No Tux, no bucks!" for more native games as well as Proton for more Linux gamers is that they didn't work. We tried the former one for years, and Linux ports were on a decline lately, then Proton arrived over a year ago, and the number of Linux gamers didn't rise.
You may be right but I think it's still a little early to tell with Proton. I mean, for most of that "over a year" it's been in beta. Is it out of beta yet, even? And for the most part, the only people who have heard of it are people already running Linux. That obviously isn't going to help people to think of trying Linux.
Proton isn't going to significantly accelerate Linux adoption unless/until some kind of product is released that runs Linux and uses Proton's ready access to Windows games as a selling point. And there's not much point in a company funding Proton (as Valve have) unless they plan some such product (or, OK, maybe just to use the threat of such a product to keep MS from pushing them). But I don't expect Valve, or anyone else, to try to release a product that significantly requires Proton as a selling point until anti-cheat issues are resolved. Anti-cheat just blocks too many of the most popular games.

So I'd want to claim the jury's still out on what effect Proton is going to have. We won't know until someone tries to use it for something, and either succeeds or fails.

Perhaps I'm being pedantic, but why would anyone other than Valve be funding "Proton"?
Wine, on the other hand, companies (including Valve) do fund.

A default packaging of wine for gaming (without needing Steam) is really needed if gaming is going to go that route. That's not something Valve alone can fix - distros, GOG, itch.io, etc, really all need to come together for a GNU/Linux gaming desktop experience, rather than Steam/Linux gaming desktop experience.
That was sort of my point, actually. Valve made (and therefore funded; it wasn't free, it cost them something) Proton. One would expect they expended those resources for some reason; just allowing existing Linux users to have a slightly better Wine doesn't seem likely to be that reason.


Last edited by Purple Library Guy on 11 December 2019 at 11:55 pm UTC
Dunc 11 Dec, 2019
Quoting: SwiftpawIgnore = not develop games for.
So what, as long as people are using Linux?

As I said, even if Proton only manages to double the Linux market share to around 2%, I'd see that as a net win. But let's say, purely for the sake of argument, that as many as 25% of the people playing Windows games end up doing it on Linux instead of natively... how could that be a bad thing?
Purple Library Guy 11 Dec, 2019
Quoting: Whitewolfe80
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: EikeThe trouble with both tactics, "No Tux, no bucks!" for more native games as well as Proton for more Linux gamers is that they didn't work. We tried the former one for years, and Linux ports were on a decline lately, then Proton arrived over a year ago, and the number of Linux gamers didn't rise.
You may be right but I think it's still a little early to tell with Proton. I mean, for most of that "over a year" it's been in beta. Is it out of beta yet, even? And for the most part, the only people who have heard of it are people already running Linux. That obviously isn't going to help people to think of trying Linux.
Proton isn't going to significantly accelerate Linux adoption unless/until some kind of product is released that runs Linux and uses Proton's ready access to Windows games as a selling point. And there's not much point in a company funding Proton (as Valve have) unless they plan some such product (or, OK, maybe just to use the threat of such a product to keep MS from pushing them). But I don't expect Valve, or anyone else, to try to release a product that significantly requires Proton as a selling point until anti-cheat issues are resolved. Anti-cheat just blocks too many of the most popular games.

So I'd want to claim the jury's still out on what effect Proton is going to have. We won't know until someone tries to use it for something, and either succeeds or fails.

Which brings up another concern valve money tap am starting to worry they will go ahh well we tried and we didnt gain any traction.
That's certainly also possible. But I have the impression Valve is very, very, very, very, very rich. What they've been doing, with the exception perhaps of the big "launch the Steam Machine" phase, is not a huge expense even just for a hedge against future contingencies, let alone if they have actual projects in mind.
The very fact that they could keep up their current level of effort forever and never notice it is actually one of the stronger counterarguments against my theory that they must have something in mind. They might just be laying groundwork so that if "just in case" ever happens, Linux will be as ready as possible for whatever play they might need to make with it, because what the heck, it's cheap insurance. It might even just be that a few upper-level Valve people have sentimental attachments to Linux; many developers are fond of Linux for its open source nature and its so-much-less-broken-than-alternatives status in many non-desktop roles.
Nonetheless, I think balance of probabilities is that they have some kind of strategy.


Last edited by Purple Library Guy on 12 December 2019 at 12:10 am UTC
t3g 12 Dec, 2019
I'm never going to support them by buying the Windows version and attempting to play on Proton. No one seems to be playing this game anyways, so screw them.
Corben 16 Dec, 2019
EAC Support for Proton is so badly needed. Or vice versa... EAC support for Linux (and easy for devs to implement) needed. Sandstorm worked already great in Proton, until EAC was introduced.
Then it just doesn't matter, as we could just hit install and play in the Steam client for Linux.

Though I'm also disappointed as they promised it for so long, and I patiently waited. I'm still playing and enjoying Insurgency (non-sandstorm version) on Linux.
iiari 16 Dec, 2019
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  • Supporter
Quoting: CorbenEAC Support for Proton is so badly needed. Or vice versa... EAC support for Linux (and easy for devs to implement) needed.
I'm not a dev, but everything I've read suggests this is not an easy process but will likely come eventually, it'll just be slower than everyone wants
Linuxpunk 19 Dec, 2019
Dropping from my wishlist... Sadly.
sbolokanov 19 Feb
Learn. Adapt. Conquer.
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