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While Metro Exodus was exclusive to the Epic Games Store for a while, it later went live on Google Stadia (which is Debian Linux) and today it's finally available on Steam. It also appears to be coming to the Linux desktop with news on that due soon.

A post on the Metro Exodus Steam forum titled "Linux Version?" that's been open since 2018 got a reply today, from the publisher Deep Silver:

We have of course reached out to Deep Silver ourselves to confirm this as well, however it would be weird for them to seek this topic out themselves to confirm it if this wasn't true. So it looks like we're getting Linux support for Metro Exodus!

Since it was ported to Stadia, it's not too much of a stretch to jump to desktop Linux on Steam. A few different libraries here and there but it's still Linux. The developer, 4A Games, did also bring the previous two Metro titles to Linux so it certainly would be nice to see them all available.

For now, you can check out Metro Exodus on Steam. However, as usual it's worth holding onto your monies until it's actually out. Once we have more information, we will share it.

Hat tip to Xakep.


Update: Deep Silver replied to our email and simply said "Yes this is correct.".

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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jens 16 February 2020 at 6:11 pm UTC
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KelvinhboI wish they would just make sure the game runs well with Proton instead of focusing resources on a native port that would surely be abandoned in a couple months.
If that's how you feel, why are you even using Linux? Go back to Windows.

Please stop that nonsense. I agree with your point that Linux releases should be supported, though sending someone away because he doesn't agree is really just a childish response.
There are lots of various reasons to use Linux and how to use Linux, all of them are valid and all of them should be accepted. You know, freedom and things..


Last edited by jens on 16 February 2020 at 6:19 pm UTC
Kelvinhbo 16 February 2020 at 6:18 pm UTC
Liam DaweI think it's important we remember there is no one size fits all approach. All have their ups and downs, both native and Proton. However, I absolutely think encouraging Linux support is the way to go, otherwise as others have said you're basically telling developers to continue only caring about Direct X and Windows only APIs. Even Rich G who used to work for Valve, said himself Proton is nothing more than a "band-aid" https://twitter.com/richgel999/status/1221569522618028032?s=19

That said, please try to respect the opinions of others, i do not want to see anyone telling another to "go back to x". If I see more of that warnings will be issued and posts will be removed as that's a level of toxic bullshit we will not have here.

I think it's the other way around, if developers just focus on Vulkan instead of Direct X we automatically get native ports for Windows and Linux. Doom 2016, Rage 2, Wolfenstein all run on Vulkan and all run exactly the same on Windows and Linux(Proton), Feral does make good ports, but they take a long time to release them, Metro Exodus have been out for a year, and it's now they are talking about a Linux port, there is no need for any of this, when developers just make sure games work well on Proton from the start.

Proton is not just a "band-aid", it's revolutionary, and all I'm trying to say is that the resources and time that are being wasted on Linux native ports could be better used on making Proton better, compatible with all games and anti-cheat systems. At this time maintaining multiple ports of games is expensive, unnecessary and unreasonable.
Shmerl 16 February 2020 at 6:22 pm UTC
KelvinhboProton is not just a "band-aid", it's revolutionary, and all I'm trying to say is that the resources and time that are being wasted on Linux native ports could be better used on making Proton better, compatible with all games and anti-cheat systems. At this time maintaining multiple ports of games is expensive, unnecessary and unreasonable.

They are already making native Linux port for Stadia, so this argument makes no sense.
Grim_reaper 16 February 2020 at 6:27 pm UTC
I will buy this game immediately when the Linux version is released!A good start for this year. Hopefully we see more surprises coming in later!Still I'm hoping that the skyrim will be released on linux as native... Maybe then I will support gol.com by giving 25000 $ per month!It would mean also that I would be the new gol.com master and you all would be my slaves! But in reality i would go immediately into bankruptcy! A bad destiny for me! Well back in the real life. Hopefully this is the year of Linux!One always hope that.....
Liam Dawe 16 February 2020 at 6:34 pm UTC
Kelvinhbo
Liam DaweI think it's important we remember there is no one size fits all approach. All have their ups and downs, both native and Proton. However, I absolutely think encouraging Linux support is the way to go, otherwise as others have said you're basically telling developers to continue only caring about Direct X and Windows only APIs. Even Rich G who used to work for Valve, said himself Proton is nothing more than a "band-aid" https://twitter.com/richgel999/status/1221569522618028032?s=19

That said, please try to respect the opinions of others, i do not want to see anyone telling another to "go back to x". If I see more of that warnings will be issued and posts will be removed as that's a level of toxic bullshit we will not have here.

I think it's the other way around, if developers just focus on Vulkan instead of Direct X we automatically get native ports for Windows and Linux. Doom 2016, Rage 2, Wolfenstein all run on Vulkan and all run exactly the same on Windows and Linux(Proton), Feral does make good ports, but they take a long time to release them, Metro Exodus have been out for a year, and it's now they are talking about a Linux port, there is no need for any of this, when developers just make sure games work well on Proton from the start.

Proton is not just a "band-aid", it's revolutionary, and all I'm trying to say is that the resources and time that are being wasted on Linux native ports could be better used on making Proton better, compatible with all games and anti-cheat systems. At this time maintaining multiple ports of games is expensive, unnecessary and unreasonable.
This is a repeating circular argument at this point, with strong opinions on both sides. I firmly think entirely relying on a compatibility layer that seeks to emulate closed APIs is a bad idea. A single point of failure, all eggs in one basket. It's not sustainable. The more people rely on it the less developers give any kind of attention to Linux, open APIs and cross-platform tech and we go even further into the backs of their minds.

Honestly, I find it amazing that people are arguing for Proton on an article where the publisher said they working on support - ridiculous.
Kelvinhbo 16 February 2020 at 6:43 pm UTC
Shmerl
KelvinhboProton is not just a "band-aid", it's revolutionary, and all I'm trying to say is that the resources and time that are being wasted on Linux native ports could be better used on making Proton better, compatible with all games and anti-cheat systems. At this time maintaining multiple ports of games is expensive, unnecessary and unreasonable.

They are already making native Linux port for Stadia, so this argument makes no sense.

I'm pretty sure they are just running the games over Vulkan and calling that a native game, or do you actually think they are re-writing the whole games and making Linux exclusive binaries?

That's the only time a Linux native game makes sense, when you write the game from the ground up to take advantage of the low level API's Linux offers. Only if the market share of Linux Desktop was high enough that would make sense.
Liam Dawe 16 February 2020 at 6:45 pm UTC
Kelvinhbo
Shmerl
KelvinhboProton is not just a "band-aid", it's revolutionary, and all I'm trying to say is that the resources and time that are being wasted on Linux native ports could be better used on making Proton better, compatible with all games and anti-cheat systems. At this time maintaining multiple ports of games is expensive, unnecessary and unreasonable.

They are already making native Linux port for Stadia, so this argument makes no sense.

I'm pretty sure they are just running the games over Vulkan and calling that a native game, or do you actually think they are re-writing the whole games and making Linux exclusive binaries?

That's the only time a Linux native game makes sense, when you write the game from the ground up to take advantage of the low level API's Linux offers. Only if the market share of Linux Desktop was high enough that would make sense.
Stadia is Debian, it's quite literally Linux. To be on Stadia, you need Vulkan AND Linux.

The developers of DOOM made their Stadia version (weirdly not live until later this year) using Ubuntu FYI. There's a video of them talking about it - look at from 21:00 for Ubuntu.


Last edited by Liam Dawe on 16 February 2020 at 6:50 pm UTC
mirv 16 February 2020 at 6:51 pm UTC
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Kelvinhbo
Shmerl
KelvinhboProton is not just a "band-aid", it's revolutionary, and all I'm trying to say is that the resources and time that are being wasted on Linux native ports could be better used on making Proton better, compatible with all games and anti-cheat systems. At this time maintaining multiple ports of games is expensive, unnecessary and unreasonable.

They are already making native Linux port for Stadia, so this argument makes no sense.

I'm pretty sure they are just running the games over Vulkan and calling that a native game, or do you actually think they are re-writing the whole games and making Linux exclusive binaries?

That's the only time a Linux native game makes sense, when you write the game from the ground up to take advantage of the low level API's Linux offers. Only if the market share of Linux Desktop was high enough that would make sense.

Actually there's a good deal of Stadia development target information out there - and yes, they are native builds of games.
Much of game engines is already platform agnostic, but the real kicker is if you have to change the basic structure to accommodate a different rendering backend. Khronos has done a lot of work to make Vulkan very flexible, so that shouldn't be too painful.
Shaders have been a problem, but Google plugged the missing gap by investing in a HLSL to SPIR-V compiler.

Of course, Stadia is a single hardware target - and that will no doubt make QA and risk assessment easier.


Last edited by mirv on 16 February 2020 at 6:52 pm UTC
bruno.tux 16 February 2020 at 7:20 pm UTC
x_wing
Comandante ÑoñardoSadly, the Steam regional price for Argentina is 4 times more expensive than the Xbox Game Pass version.

But with game pass you don't own the game, you have to pay monthly in order to get access to it, doesn't it? More over, how you will be able to download this game with game pass when you need Microsoft Store in order to play it? I don't understand your comparison...

Either way, right now I see it on Steam for $899,40 ($1160,23 with taxes). For a AAA game with native support is quite cheap IMO.

899 US$? What? In Brazil is 10 US$.
Kelvinhbo 16 February 2020 at 7:39 pm UTC
mirv
Kelvinhbo
Shmerl
KelvinhboProton is not just a "band-aid", it's revolutionary, and all I'm trying to say is that the resources and time that are being wasted on Linux native ports could be better used on making Proton better, compatible with all games and anti-cheat systems. At this time maintaining multiple ports of games is expensive, unnecessary and unreasonable.

They are already making native Linux port for Stadia, so this argument makes no sense.

I'm pretty sure they are just running the games over Vulkan and calling that a native game, or do you actually think they are re-writing the whole games and making Linux exclusive binaries?

That's the only time a Linux native game makes sense, when you write the game from the ground up to take advantage of the low level API's Linux offers. Only if the market share of Linux Desktop was high enough that would make sense.

Actually there's a good deal of Stadia development target information out there - and yes, they are native builds of games.
Much of game engines is already platform agnostic, but the real kicker is if you have to change the basic structure to accommodate a different rendering backend. Khronos has done a lot of work to make Vulkan very flexible, so that shouldn't be too painful.
Shaders have been a problem, but Google plugged the missing gap by investing in a HLSL to SPIR-V compiler.

Of course, Stadia is a single hardware target - and that will no doubt make QA and risk assessment easier.


Ok. So a game like Destiny 2 have been completely re-written for Linux and is not running over Vulkan for Stadia.
Would love to see some evidence on that if you don't mind.
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