You can sign up to get a daily email of our articles, see the Mailing List page!

NVIDIA have a little present available for Linux fans today, with the release of the 435.17 beta driver now being available.

This is a beta driver and it includes quite the highlight with the addition of PRIME render offload support for Vulkan and OpenGL. This is where you might have your Intel GPU running most normal applications, with an NVIDIA chip then powering your games. It's usually found in Notebooks and it's been a source of annoyance for NVIDIA Notebook owners for a long time, so it's really pleasing to see proper progress like this.

It comes with some caveats though, as it needs a very up to date X.Org Server with git commits not available in a normal release yet. However, if you're on Ubuntu 19.04 or 18.04 NVIDIA have provided a PPA. There's a little additional work needed for now too, you can read more about the PRIME render offload support here.

For the rest of what's in this new driver, it has the usual assortment of bug fixes and "experimental support for runtime D3 (RTD3) power management on Turing notebook GPUs". The full changelog can be found here.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
25 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more information here.
About the author -
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
31 comments
Page: «2/4»
  Go to:

chancho_zombie 13 August 2019 at 10:03 pm UTC
JuliusAhh... took them only 10+ years

Still great news... I hope it comes to Solus soon.

I had an amd crossfire setup before and it worked a very long time ago!! this is the "premium" nvidia suppport??


Last edited by chancho_zombie at 13 August 2019 at 10:04 pm UTC
MrKiasu 14 August 2019 at 12:20 am UTC
View PC info
  • Supporter
DuncI wish there was an equivalent to PRIME render offloading on desktops. I have a GPU here on my motherboard that's literally never been used.

(And yes, I know it's an architectural limitation and there isn't really any way of using it and a PCIe card at the same time. But it's annoying all the same.)

It can work. I don't think any of the codepaths actually care if your machine is a desktop or laptop. In my case, I've got a new turing GPU and I configured the BIOS to enable both the external and internal GPUs (Every BIOS I've ever seen has supported this) and then the Ubuntu PRIME support kicked in and worked the same as you'd expect on a laptop. It would come up on the iGPU and I could switch it to full-screen offload on the nvidia GPU.

On top of that, it can handle when the system is booted with the nvidia GPU connected to the display (the EFI is smart and knows which GPU has a display connected and makes that primary on each boot). It will disable all the PRIME stuff and load the nvidia driver normally.

I did have to make some additional changes to the PRIME support scripts to turn on uncertified gsync, which requires extra xorg.conf content. But at the end of all this, I could switch between nvidia primary and intel primary by changing which GPU the display is plugged into, and when plugged into intel, I can use PRIME to activate the nvidia.

Interestingly, with this setup, trying to use Wayland on the nvidia GPU actually causes the desktop to be rendered on the intel GPU and then outputted on the nvidia GPU. It's slow and unresponsive, but it isn't supposed to work, so that was amusing.

I expect this per-app offload functionality to also work fine on a desktop; I'll try it in the near future.
Luke_Nukem 14 August 2019 at 1:27 am UTC
This is the example /etc/X11/xorg.conf I used:


Section "ServerLayout"
  Identifier "layout"
  Screen 0 "iGPU"
  Option "AllowNVIDIAGPUScreens"
EndSection

Section "Device"
  Identifier "iGPU"
  Driver "modesetting"
  BusID "PCI:00:02:0"
EndSection

Section "Screen"
  Identifier "iGPU"
  Device "iGPU"
EndSection

# May or may not need this section
#Section "Device"
#  Identifier "nvidia"
#  Driver "nvidia"
#  BusID "PCI:01:00:0"
#EndSection


I'm not able to get the power-off for Turing working though. Not sure why yet.


Last edited by Luke_Nukem at 14 August 2019 at 1:28 am UTC
Leopard 14 August 2019 at 6:59 am UTC
sigz
LeopardBumblebee is thrash and not necessary.

Don't say that... bumblebee helped a lot in the past when there was no other solutions..

No? Bumblebee didn't help for anything. Prime was a better solution , at least it was reliable.

While Bumblebee was not.
Ivancillo 14 August 2019 at 7:21 am UTC
QuoteThis is where you might have your Intel GPU running most normal applications, with an NVIDIA chip then powering your games.

Does this mean that it only work on laptops with Intel CPU?

What about Ryzen ones?
flesk 14 August 2019 at 7:25 am UTC
View PC info
  • Contributing Editor
  • Supporter
  • Top Supporter
Leopard
sigz
LeopardBumblebee is thrash and not necessary.

Don't say that... bumblebee helped a lot in the past when there was no other solutions..

No? Bumblebee didn't help for anything. Prime was a better solution , at least it was reliable.

While Bumblebee was not.

Prime didn't become available until 2016 though, while Bumblebee has been around since at least 2011. For half a decade it was the only (good) option for utilizing dual graphics on Linux, and that's worth something. It was always a hassle to set up and tended to break with driver upgrades, so I'm glad there are better, official options now for those of us still stuck with Optimus laptops.
Gnomerick 14 August 2019 at 10:56 am UTC
PRIME output capability was added to the nvidia driver
2013-04-09 version 319.12
2016 was the year of PRIME sync, i.e. tear free vsync'd display.
Testing the render offload feature I can say it's working fine, Steam Proton games working without a hitch. Might be interesting to run some benchmarks comparing PRIME output with render offload.
Pre-Turing gpus always having to stay powered is a downside, of course, but I can understand why nvidia devs made that decision. A lot of crappy notebook hardware has been sold over the years with broken acpi/bioses and flawed intel pcie controllers.
Nanobang 14 August 2019 at 12:04 pm UTC
I gave up futzing with all this a long time ago, shortly after Primus came along. I set my (I-will-never-buy-another) Optimus laptop to "Nvidia" and keep it plugged in. The downside is that sounds and feels like an idling Harrier Jump Jet. The upside is that it will probably die sooner, and the sooner it dies, the sooner I can look into non-Optimus options.
Dunc 14 August 2019 at 1:12 pm UTC
MrKiasu
DuncI wish there was an equivalent to PRIME render offloading on desktops. I have a GPU here on my motherboard that's literally never been used.

(And yes, I know it's an architectural limitation and there isn't really any way of using it and a PCIe card at the same time. But it's annoying all the same.)

It can work. I don't think any of the codepaths actually care if your machine is a desktop or laptop. In my case, I've got a new turing GPU and I configured the BIOS to enable both the external and internal GPUs (Every BIOS I've ever seen has supported this)...
I'll have to check, but I'm pretty certain mine doesn't. And I have to say, I don't think I've ever seen one that does; that was part of the “architectural limitation” I was referring to. EFI, yes, but not an actual BIOS. (Maybe I should have been clearer on that. Having never owned an EFI machine, I tend to forget it exists even though it's more or less universal now. )

Thanks for the info, though. I'll have to look into it further.


You know what? I did look into it further, and after poking around my BIOS a bit, I discovered that yes, it does support both GPUs being enabled. The way it's worded in the menus is what confused me, but you're absolutely right and I have to eat my words.

Saying that, it turns out to be a 7000 series which isn't supported in the proprietary driver any more and it probably isn't worth trying to get it to work anyway. But still, I stand corrected.


Last edited by Dunc at 15 August 2019 at 1:04 am UTC
edo 14 August 2019 at 2:01 pm UTC
Leopard
sigz
LeopardBumblebee is thrash and not necessary.

Don't say that... bumblebee helped a lot in the past when there was no other solutions..

No? Bumblebee didn't help for anything. Prime was a better solution , at least it was reliable.

While Bumblebee was not.

Prime require you to switch session, while bumblebee works in the main session. There is a bit of performance overhead but at least there is no need to switch session which is very annoying for those who dont use the pc for only gaming. And when you need to get full performance, there is always nvidia-xrun
  Go to:
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on Patreon, Liberapay or Paypal. We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!

You need to Register and Login to comment, submit articles and more.


Or login with...

Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams
  • Sneaky Beaky: „Aragami: Nightfall“
  • Date:
See more!
Popular this week
View by Category
Contact
Latest Comments
Latest Forum Posts