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Today, NVIDIA's brand new "SUPER" series has been officially released, along with a new Linux driver.

Available now are both the GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER and GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER, with the GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER due to release later on July 23rd.

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Both cards are based on the Turing architecture, come with 8GB GDDR6 as standard, they also both have a 14Gbps listed Memory Speed, a 256-bit listed Memory Interface Width and 448GB/sec listed Memory Bandwidth. As for the rest, I've listed some of the specifications for each below:

GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER

  • 2176 "NVIDIA CUDA Cores"
  • 1470Mhz Base Clock + 1650Mhz Boost Clock

GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER

  • 2560 "NVIDIA CUDA Cores"
  • 1605Mhz Base Clock + 1770Mhz Boost Clock

More info on the cards can be found on the official NVIDIA website.

As for the brand new 430.34 driver release, it's a pretty small and focused update to add in support for the new cards. It adds support for the GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER, GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER, Quadro RTX 4000 with Max-Q Design and Quadro RTX 5000 with Max-Q Design and nothing else is noted for it.

Find the details on the new driver here.

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52 comments
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Shmerl 22 July 2019 at 3:55 pm UTC
lunixNot really, but it seems like it does have quite a few disadvantages.

What kind? The only reason Nvidia is not opening their driver is anti-competitive. I.e. they want leverage over server market. Are you whitewashing such kind of behavior? What Nvidia doing is disgusting, and not something Linux users should be accepting.


Last edited by Shmerl at 22 July 2019 at 3:56 pm UTC
Ehvis 22 July 2019 at 4:02 pm UTC
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Shmerl
lunixNot really, but it seems like it does have quite a few disadvantages.

What kind? The only reason Nvidia is not opening their driver is anti-competitive. I.e. they want leverage over server market. Are you whitewashing such kind of behavior? What Nvidia doing is disgusting, and not something Linux users should be accepting.

And AMD is doing the same thing. They open the trivial stuff, but keep other things they think are important. Like the actual shader compiler of the AMD driver.

They are companies, they do what suits them. AMD is no more ethical than NVidia is.
Shmerl 22 July 2019 at 4:07 pm UTC
EhvisAnd AMD is doing the same thing. They open the trivial stuff, but keep other things they think are important. Like the actual shader compiler of the AMD driver.

They are companies, they do what suits them. AMD is no more ethical than NVidia is.

They might do what "suits them", but when it's anti-competitive junk, I don't get why Linux users jump to whitewash it.
Ehvis 22 July 2019 at 4:11 pm UTC
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Shmerl
EhvisAnd AMD is doing the same thing. They open the trivial stuff, but keep other things they think are important. Like the actual shader compiler of the AMD driver.

They are companies, they do what suits them. AMD is no more ethical than NVidia is.

They might do what "suits them", but when it's anti-competitive junk, I don't get why Linux users jump to whitewash it.

Because if the roles were reversed and nvidia would be playing catch up, AMD would be no different. It's simple business. The only thing that matters is that it is preferable to have open support for hardware. Which is a bandwagon I will step on when support is complete. Unfortunately, things open source can also take a lot of time.
Shmerl 22 July 2019 at 4:30 pm UTC
EhvisThe only thing that matters is that it is preferable to have open support for hardware.

Not preferable, required for proper Linux support. I.e. those who don't do it while having all resources to, are foul players in the Linux ecosystem. And Nvidia is such an example. Hypothetical speculation like "what if it was reversed" is pointless.


Last edited by Shmerl at 22 July 2019 at 4:31 pm UTC
x_wing 22 July 2019 at 6:19 pm UTC
lunix
x_wingThere way too many advantages of having the Open Source driver

Not really, but it seems like it does have quite a few disadvantages.

Like the driver issue? Check it out here: https://www.amd.com/en/support/kb/release-notes/rn-amdgpu-unified-navi-linux

I mentioned you way too many advantages for gaming on Linux with the FOSS graphic driver. Think whatever you want.

lunix
x_wingand the hardware that sells AMD has an excellent performance compared to Nvidia (if not better).

And that's a lie according to the benchmarks. The 5700xt is a good card but the rest from amd are really weak competitors.

Are you sure? https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=radeon-5700-linuxgl&num=6

lunix
x_wingWe are talking about the quality of a product in our OS, and AMD exceeds by far to Nvidia products in almost every tier (from my point of view).

Well, your point of view is biased so that's your problem.

Is a bias to use software quality in the equation of an overall quality? I think not... but well, that's what I think.

lunix
x_wingBy the way, regarding the overheating "issue" both sides has this troubles: https://www.tomshardware.com/news/rtx-2080-ti-gpu-defects-launch,37995.html
Funny, that with AMD it's almost always the first issue.

And you call me "biased"


Last edited by x_wing at 22 July 2019 at 6:20 pm UTC
Purple Library Guy 22 July 2019 at 8:45 pm UTC
lunix
Purple Library GuyMore seriously it's been my experience that people often say things like "X isn't a religion" when what they mean is "I don't care about ethics and I don't want to have to defend that".

And when I hear people saying things like what you said I know what they mean is "I don't understand Intellectual Property or licensing and I would rather follow trends mindlessly instead of thinking objectively."

Purple Library GuyThere are ethical and functional reasons to prefer open source when it's feasible

Ethical? No. Functional? Yes, but it depends. Most probably nvidia doesn't need to hide its code - it's doing it because their code might contain 3rd-party code with a different license. This is usually the case with most closed-source software.

Purple Library Guyparticularly when it comes to infrastructure or other as it were "central" things which can create lock-in.

If you use nvidia you use nvidia - there is no real lock-in. Nvidia is not a necessity anyway.

Purple Library GuyThe world would be a better place in significant respects if, in all the niches that have open source versions, those open source versions dominated over closed.

Only if piracy wouldn't exist.

Purple Library GuyGames are a weird corner case in which open source is rarely feasible, and there are various reasons why it is difficult for that to change and why it doesn't matter nearly as much.

IP is not a corner case - it's the main case.

Purple Library GuySo not worrying about the open sourceness of games is not really a reason you shouldn't be allowed to find open source important in general. And in general, open source is in fact important.

Open-source is important, but not critical. It could be the defacto standard if piracy wouldn't exist.
There is nothing here that gives me the impression that you understand either my points or perhaps even yours. I could give you a dissertation on ethics, the nature of open source and copyleft licenses, the ephemeral nature of games, the distinction between things like programs and recipes on one hand and things like art and stories on the other, and why piracy is not all that important, but you wouldn't read it with an eye to understanding what I'm getting at so there isn't much point.
lunix 4 August 2019 at 4:49 pm UTC
Purple Library Guy
lunix
Purple Library GuyMore seriously it's been my experience that people often say things like "X isn't a religion" when what they mean is "I don't care about ethics and I don't want to have to defend that".

And when I hear people saying things like what you said I know what they mean is "I don't understand Intellectual Property or licensing and I would rather follow trends mindlessly instead of thinking objectively."

Purple Library GuyThere are ethical and functional reasons to prefer open source when it's feasible

Ethical? No. Functional? Yes, but it depends. Most probably nvidia doesn't need to hide its code - it's doing it because their code might contain 3rd-party code with a different license. This is usually the case with most closed-source software.

Purple Library Guyparticularly when it comes to infrastructure or other as it were "central" things which can create lock-in.



If you use nvidia you use nvidia - there is no real lock-in. Nvidia is not a necessity anyway.

Purple Library GuyThe world would be a better place in significant respects if, in all the niches that have open source versions, those open source versions dominated over closed.

Only if piracy wouldn't exist.

Purple Library GuyGames are a weird corner case in which open source is rarely feasible, and there are various reasons why it is difficult for that to change and why it doesn't matter nearly as much.

IP is not a corner case - it's the main case.

Purple Library GuySo not worrying about the open sourceness of games is not really a reason you shouldn't be allowed to find open source important in general. And in general, open source is in fact important.

Open-source is important, but not critical. It could be the defacto standard if piracy wouldn't exist.
There is nothing here that gives me the impression that you understand either my points or perhaps even yours. I could give you a dissertation on ethics, the nature of open source and copyleft licenses, the ephemeral nature of games, the distinction between things like programs and recipes on one hand and things like art and stories on the other, and why piracy is not all that important, but you wouldn't read it with an eye to understanding what I'm getting at so there isn't much point.

You sound like someone who thinks his words are the law but in the meantime, your thoughts are nothing but memes formed in the inbred amd-only community. You and @Shmerl will just continue to repeat the exact same anti-nvidia circlejerk while ignoring all the drawbacks of mesa and magnifying the issues of the proprietary drivers.
You're biased, not logical. It doesn't matter what you would write because you're not going to be objective.


Last edited by lunix at 4 August 2019 at 5:09 pm UTC
lunix 4 August 2019 at 4:54 pm UTC
x_wingLike the driver issue? Check it out here: https://www.amd.com/en/support/kb/release-notes/rn-amdgpu-unified-navi-linux

I mentioned you way too many advantages for gaming on Linux with the FOSS graphic driver. Think whatever you want.

You didn't mention any advantage.

x_wingAre you sure? https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=radeon-5700-linuxgl&num=6

Yes, I'm sure. The 5700xt card is impressive but the rest aren't.

x_wingIs a bias to use software quality in the equation of an overall quality? I think not... but well, that's what I think.

Well, if you're interested in software quality then why even bother with mesa?

x_wingAnd you call me "biased"

Yes, because the new amd cards still have heating problems - just like the vega and the rx cards had(still do).


Last edited by lunix at 4 August 2019 at 5:07 pm UTC
lunix 4 August 2019 at 5:06 pm UTC
Shmerl
EhvisThe only thing that matters is that it is preferable to have open support for hardware.

Not preferable, required for proper Linux support. I.e. those who don't do it while having all resources to, are foul players in the Linux ecosystem. And Nvidia is such an example. Hypothetical speculation like "what if it was reversed" is pointless.

Nonsense. A reminder:

Nvidia: releases the driver with the hardware on the same day, even for linux.
AMD: "We are targeting a launch day driver [for Linux] but Windows obviously takes priority"(https://www.forbes.com/sites/jasonevangelho/2019/07/02/will-amd-radeon-rx-5700xt-graphics-cards-support-linux-gaming/#4e6d19043af9)

Nvidia supported linux for years, while amd barely did it 2-3 years ago and still doesn't take it seriously.
With amd, you can still see many broken/poorly performing games.

And there is no value in a monolithic gpu driver because it'll be harder to get the latest driver - and as you can see, it's a problem for new navi users.
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