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This isn't exactly related to gaming, but Pixar Film Production have shown off their work using Linux + OpenGL in animating films. They say it can be used for games too and it's now open source.

If you're wondering, this was done using the System76 Bonobo WS available here.

I was pretty amazed by the speed of it, the guy himself said "3 seconds for 52 million polygons" as he demonstrated it directly.

See the full info on their now opened up Universal Scene Description right here.

The code is available on Github.

Hopefully if any developers follow us they might find it interesting, and general users might like to know about this open source effort by Pixar.
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Ehvis 4 September 2016 at 3:58 pm UTC
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I don't think it was entirely clear to some people, but what was open sourced is not the actual animation software, but the back end. I'm not even sure there is a rendering engine in there. So it's not something that is usable for an artist.
BlackBloodRum 4 September 2016 at 4:17 pm UTC
Not bad, not bad.
mirv 4 September 2016 at 5:26 pm UTC
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EhvisI don't think it was entirely clear to some people, but what was open sourced is not the actual animation software, but the back end. I'm not even sure there is a rendering engine in there. So it's not something that is usable for an artist.

Congrats, you win the medal for reading through what is actually being released. There is a rendering backend it would seem ("Hydra", but the primary focus is on what is basically scene management for very high polygon scenes. The render, btw, is not the final thing seen on movie screens, but rather something to allow artists to approximate it.

I'm also take their 52-million-poly claim with a grain of salt. I suspect it's more about quickly loading a program that can handle a scene of that size; they did mention elsewhere that data is streamed in, so I don't think they actually load everything at once.
That's not to say this isn't cool news, or it's not interesting (quite the opposite, it's both), but I'm not really sure what applications this has. I suppose it could help by integration into certain content creation pipelines, but we'll see.
pythoneer 5 September 2016 at 10:48 am UTC
Are there any "hard facts" and/or numbers that show that linux is used in "hollywood productions" on a larger scale? I know a few examples myself but this thin data is by no means representative. I know that studios (or any other company) is very closed about how internals work, what software to use etc. But i wonder if there are some metrics existent in what professional fields linux does play a role. I, for myself, having a professional programming background know that linux is quite common (based on the field etc.) the stackoverflow developer survey has some nice stats (please note that this number are quite biased based on the userbase here) http://stackoverflow.com/research/developer-survey-2016#technology-desktop-operating-system

i wonder if there is something equivalent in other professional fields
elmapul 12 November 2016 at 2:25 am UTC
shit! i need quote this video, any one has an backup? its not online anymore =\
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