You can sign up to get a daily email of our articles, see the Mailing List page!

PlayOnLinux has a new alpha release out with an overhaul of the interface

Posted by , | Views: 7,529

PlayOnLinux, a program which helps Linux users manage games run in Wine has a new release out aimed at giving the project a new life.

PlayOnLinux 5.0 alpha 1 code-named "Phoenicis" includes a completely redesigned user interface, along with moving their scripting system from bash to JavaScript. They're also now storing the scripts POL uses to install and setup games and applications on GitHub, so that if there's problems with their own infrastructure you can still use POL.

If you can't run it on Ubuntu 18.04, you're not alone. They seem to be having issues with it not working on the latest Java, hopefully they will solve that in time. For now they're telling people to use Java 8. More info on the issue here and here.

See their news post here.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
21 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more information here.
22 comments
Page: «2/3»
  Go to:

qptain Nemo 24 September 2018 at 5:17 pm UTC
CybolicWhile it's always nice to see more development on user-focused Wine tools, I wish that PlayOnLinux would focus more on uniting the field instead of doing their own thing again. Using Java is one thing, but coming up with yet another install script framework - in a different scripting language from what's generally considered the standard for these thing - isn't really helping build a solid, widely usable pool of install scripts. We already have Winetricks and Lutris (both of which use Bash shell scripts), I really don't see how adding JavaScript to the mix will help.

Disclaimer: I wrote Vineyard so I'm fairly biased ;)
I can't express how much I wish Lutris, POL and Vineyard somehow joined forces.
POL has great prefix management tools.
Vineyard has a great set of useful options for running stuff.
Lutris has another great set of useful options for running stuff.

It's amazing but also so, so frustrating. A tool that contains all options from both Lutris and Vineyard and has prefix management capabilities of POL would absolutely rock. I'd sorta prefer that unification happened under the Lutris umbrella but I don't want it to be a matter of contention.


Last edited by qptain Nemo at 24 September 2018 at 5:19 pm UTC
Cybolic 25 September 2018 at 2:39 pm UTC
qptain Nemo
CybolicWhile it's always nice to see more development on user-focused Wine tools, I wish that PlayOnLinux would focus more on uniting the field instead of doing their own thing again. Using Java is one thing, but coming up with yet another install script framework - in a different scripting language from what's generally considered the standard for these thing - isn't really helping build a solid, widely usable pool of install scripts. We already have Winetricks and Lutris (both of which use Bash shell scripts), I really don't see how adding JavaScript to the mix will help.

Disclaimer: I wrote Vineyard so I'm fairly biased ;)
I can't express how much I wish Lutris, POL and Vineyard somehow joined forces.
POL has great prefix management tools.
Vineyard has a great set of useful options for running stuff.
Lutris has another great set of useful options for running stuff.

It's amazing but also so, so frustrating. A tool that contains all options from both Lutris and Vineyard and has prefix management capabilities of POL would absolutely rock. I'd sorta prefer that unification happened under the Lutris umbrella but I don't want it to be a matter of contention.

There have been talks about joining forces previously, which mostly amounted to settling on how prefixes are handled (generally, and at least in Winetricks, Vineyard and Lutris; POL is doing its own thing there as well), but apart from that, I think a lot of the separation of work comes from having different end goals.
Lutris aims to be a generic frontend for game emulation/handling.
POL aims to be a Wine-focused frontend game handling.
Vineyard aims to be a generic frontend for anything related to Wine.

I'm curious about you mentioning that you prefer the prefix management in POL; I always found it incredibly confusing. In Vineyard, the prefix is meant to be the top-level interface and everything you do happens under that. How does POL differ and what are the benefits?
Draconicrose 25 September 2018 at 4:23 pm UTC
It's a good thing that Lutris came along as well. I always thought that PoL was resting on its laurels a little when it came to the user experience.

I've honestly had much better results with Lutris, both in ease of use and actually having things work, so competition in the space seems healthy.
qptain Nemo 26 September 2018 at 3:17 am UTC
CybolicThere have been talks about joining forces previously, which mostly amounted to settling on how prefixes are handled (generally, and at least in Winetricks, Vineyard and Lutris; POL is doing its own thing there as well), but apart from that, I think a lot of the separation of work comes from having different end goals.
Lutris aims to be a generic frontend for game emulation/handling.
POL aims to be a Wine-focused frontend game handling.
Vineyard aims to be a generic frontend for anything related to Wine.
Fair enough, I have no qualms with them remaining separate tools but the fact that Vineyard and Lutris offer different sets of very useful options that aren't available anywhere else either makes me want to cry. By all means remain separate, but they need to be all brought together in at least one place. I just really want Lutris to have all of them and to have some kinda good prefix management tool if I'm being honest and I obviously wouldn't mind if Vineyard got those from Lutris either.

CybolicI'm curious about you mentioning that you prefer the prefix management in POL; I always found it incredibly confusing. In Vineyard, the prefix is meant to be the top-level interface and everything you do happens under that. How does POL differ and what are the benefits?
Let's see.
Creation:
  • creating a new prefix is pretty much the same, if you don't count the fact that POL lets you download different wine versions in advance and easily create fresh prefixes with any wine version it provides; whether it's a "fair" comparison or not in practical usage it's a huge advantage for when you need to test a lot of things under different configurations


Management:
  • POL has a button for opening winecfg for a given prefix (technically, vineyard does include pretty much every setting from there though...)

  • POL offers more installers of various system components

  • you can switch the wine version after creating a prefix as much a you want as well as easily get additional wine versions as they're needed



I absolutely agree though that the whole UI presentation paradigm of Vineyard is much more straightforward, you actually need to go to the settings window of POL to get to all those tools, but in terms of practicality some of those advantages are significant especially in scenarios where rapid creation and testing of prefixes and experimentation are needed. I guess the biggest one here is the ability to download and switch between wine versions. This feature is incredibly helpful in both Lutris and POL.
Cybolic 26 September 2018 at 9:50 am UTC
qptain Nemo[...]

CybolicI'm curious about you mentioning that you prefer the prefix management in POL; I always found it incredibly confusing. In Vineyard, the prefix is meant to be the top-level interface and everything you do happens under that. How does POL differ and what are the benefits?
Let's see.
Creation:
  • creating a new prefix is pretty much the same, if you don't count the fact that POL lets you download different wine versions in advance and easily create fresh prefixes with any wine version it provides; whether it's a "fair" comparison or not in practical usage it's a huge advantage for when you need to test a lot of things under different configurations


Management:
  • POL has a button for opening winecfg for a given prefix (technically, vineyard does include pretty much every setting from there though...)

  • POL offers more installers of various system components

  • you can switch the wine version after creating a prefix as much a you want as well as easily get additional wine versions as they're needed



I absolutely agree though that the whole UI presentation paradigm of Vineyard is much more straightforward, you actually need to go to the settings window of POL to get to all those tools, but in terms of practicality some of those advantages are significant especially in scenarios where rapid creation and testing of prefixes and experimentation are needed. I guess the biggest one here is the ability to download and switch between wine versions. This feature is incredibly helpful in both Lutris and POL.

Oh yes, I absolutely agree! I've often wanted to add the Wine version handling that POL has, but the choice is either to create my own repo of Wine versions and duplicate the work they've already done (which seems a waste of resources and yet another split effort) or download directly from their repo (and steal their bandwidth, essentially). It's the same thing with Lutris' handling of DXVK and a bit of a rock-and-a-hard-place situation all in all.
This would probably be the perfect example of somewhere we should really be working together though; maybe something will happen eventually, but currently, the only solution I can offer is that Vineyard does let you use Wine versions that you've already downloaded in POL.
As for the other points (for Vineyard at least), that's the result of me just not having enough free time these days to add installers and new options

Thanks for the dialogue, I think you're on to something here ;)
marcelomendes 27 September 2018 at 4:36 pm UTC
Don't need any more Java in my life. Thus I ditched POL and now I use vanilla wine managed by myself. No regrets.
kurp 30 September 2018 at 9:39 am UTC
Exactly as legluondunet, I've never used PlayOnLinux for their scripts, which, indeed, are outdated and rarely works. But the tool is just perfect for managing Wine versions and additional components. Even removing whole "virtual disc" is quite useful. Never found anything better than this, except maybe adamhm's scripts for GOG games.
Jack_Black 9 February 2019 at 12:03 pm UTC
New post to a old news: PlayOnLinux 5 Alpha 2 is out since beginning of january 2019. And it looks very promising. It already has a better compatibility than the old PlayOnLinux 4. It contains several different (Wine-)Engines, a lot of new installer-scripts, works fine with Ubuntu 18.04, has GoG- and special Dos-support integrated etc. And it is very good addition to Lutris. In the ladder you cannot install games manually, if there is no installation-script or if the installation-script does not work (properly). At least I could not do it. Hence you can use PlayOnLinux 5 to install games in new "containers", and then add, start and play these games using Lutris.

If you are interested in trying out new software, than have a look at this link:

https://www.playonlinux.com/en/comments-1368.html

You can even install it besides PlayOnLinux 4 and compare both directly, because it uses other directories ("Phoenicis"). Only bigger disadvange at the moment: You cannot change the used wine-version for a game after installation, but this will be fixed in the next Version(s).

For those interested, have fun by testing it and maybe it is even the author of this site a look and article worth ;). I found some comments in the internet, where people believe PlayOnLinux is dead, because the news are currently only shown on the english version of their webpage. That is my motivation for posting this comment.
Lakorta 10 February 2019 at 1:22 am UTC
Jack_BlackFor those interested, have fun by testing it and maybe it is even the author of this site a look and article worth ;).
If you haven't already done so you can send Liam (the owner of this site) a message to let him know.
Jack_Black 10 February 2019 at 3:50 pm UTC
Lakorta
Jack_BlackFor those interested, have fun by testing it and maybe it is even the author of this site a look and article worth ;).
If you haven't already done so you can send Liam (the owner of this site) a message to let him know.

He should know, because my post was held for moderation, due to it was my first comment here. Would write an article by myself, but english is not my first language and I am new to the linux community. Do not want to write unintentionally any hoax.

Kind Regards.
  Go to:
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on Patreon, Liberapay or Paypal. We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!

Due to spam you need to Register and Login to comment.


Or login with...

Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams
  • Build Up: „Widelands“
  • Date:
See more!
Popular this week
View by Category
Contact
Latest Comments
Latest Forum Posts