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One of the people behind Project Hospital [Official Site] emailed in about the project, which aims to be a full hospital management sim much like Theme Hospital. Also, it's partially made on Linux.

The developer who emailed it in, let us know that the team involved in it has the choice of which operating system they can develop on. One of the programmers has been using Unity on Linux and said how it works just fine. Hearing that, fills me with hope about the future on Linux as a development platform as well as a gaming platform. The amount of people emailing in saying they use Unity on Linux to develop has been increasing.

As someone who still to this day has his original Theme Hospital disk, I might be a little bit in love with the style of Project Hospital.

Features

  • Build your hospital: use a variety of objects, materials and colors to make it truly yours or save your time and use one of many different prefabs
  • Manage your staff: from hiring to specializations, from doctors to janitors, make sure everybody is doing a great job and finds satisfaction in their work
  • Diagnose patients: help your doctors and walk them through the most complicated cases or just follow your favorite patients
  • Build new exciting departments: from simple ER to specialized departments with labs and advanced equipment, build and improve your ability to help the patients leave your hospital happy and healthy
  • Explore hundreds of medical conditions: learn about real world diseases and injuries and how to diagnose and cure them
  • Help us create your own game: let us know what you miss and become a part of defining the future of the game. Or mod in your very own content for you and your friends

From the press release:

Become an aspiring architect, a successful manager and an ace doctor all at the same time. Design your very own hospital, tweak every detail or use one of the predefined models and just jump to the doctor's duty. Contract different insurance companies to gain access to patients with interesting medical conditions, perform examinations, laboratory tests and use various equipment to solve the diagnostic puzzles. Treat your patients by various methods and gain reputation to access different departments and the most advanced equipment.

Focus on any aspect of the game—Is it the most fun for you to keep your staff and patients happy? Do you aim to cure as many people as possible or solve the most complicated cases? Or do you maybe want to become the best manager and make biggest profit? Our game will let you choose your priorities!

It's due for release on Steam sometime next year.

10 Likes, Who?
razing32 16 November 2017 at 12:10 pm UTC
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Heh . Neat

I liked Theme Hospital despite never being any good at it.
Wondering how this shapes up.
wleoncio 16 November 2017 at 12:45 pm UTC
I was quite excited until I saw the video and saw it contained none of the humor of the original, which IMHO is what made the game. To this day I make "Bloaty Head" jokes with my brother.
liamdawe 16 November 2017 at 1:19 pm UTC
wleoncioI was quite excited until I saw the video and saw it contained none of the humor of the original, which IMHO is what made the game. To this day I make "Bloaty Head" jokes with my brother.
Indeed, I do think they should inject a bit of humour into it. Otherwise it could fall into a trap of being too bland.
stretch611 16 November 2017 at 2:44 pm UTC
QuoteOne of the programmers has been using Unity on Linux and said how it works just fine. Hearing that, fills me with hope about the future on Linux as a development platform as well as a gaming platform.
I hate to nitpick... especially on a topic that is not quite in the theme of this site... But, linux as a development environment has been strong for quite some time. I believe that I can safely say that linux is far stronger for development needs than it is for gaming needs.

I have had all my needs as a dev platform fulfilled for the last 10+ years in linux... that is what allowed me to drop windows completely. I still needed dual booting for games after I made the switch to developing full time on linux. Back then WINE was not as good as it is now, and we certainly did not have all the native titles that we do now.

Admittedly, gaming development may not have been as strong all those years, but part of that is the fact it helps a lot when the system you are coding on can execute and test the program you are writing. It can be frustrating waiting for compiles... no one wants to add the time necessary to reboot into a different OS just to test.

EDIT: All those reboots just to play a game was a huge factor to me. It weighed heavily on my personal decision not to buy all the shiny new windows titles. Especially when getting an off-hours call and having to immediately save the game I was playing (assuming I was at a point I could save) and reboot back to linux just to solve a quick problem. (Compared to now when I generally just swap out the game and leave it running in the background.)

Back then when the Humble Indie Bundle first appeared, and the games supported linux, it was a no-brainer. I was sold, and that really became the point where I never had to dual boot again.


Last edited by stretch611 at 16 November 2017 at 2:54 pm UTC
liamdawe 16 November 2017 at 2:53 pm UTC
stretch611
QuoteOne of the programmers has been using Unity on Linux and said how it works just fine. Hearing that, fills me with hope about the future on Linux as a development platform as well as a gaming platform.
I hate to nitpick... especially on a topic that is not quite in the theme of this site... But, linux as a development environment has been strong for quite some time. I believe that I can safely say that linux is far stronger for development needs than it is for gaming needs.
For game development, Linux has not historically been a great platform, since the major game engines have hardly ever supported it. Not only that, but the middleware has also historically had poor support for Linux. Only recently have their editors been available on Linux.

Nitpick all you like, but even now it's still pretty rare to find people developing full commercial games on Linux.

Edit: Food for thought, in the many years I've been doing this less than 30 people have ever said they used Linux to make their game. I'm probably over-estimating that number too.


Last edited by liamdawe at 16 November 2017 at 3:05 pm UTC
ShabbyX 16 November 2017 at 4:01 pm UTC
stretch611
QuoteOne of the programmers has been using Unity on Linux and said how it works just fine. Hearing that, fills me with hope about the future on Linux as a development platform as well as a gaming platform.
I hate to nitpick... especially on a topic that is not quite in the theme of this site... But, linux as a development environment has been strong for quite some time. I believe that I can safely say that linux is far stronger for development needs than it is for gaming needs.

I have had all my needs as a dev platform fulfilled for the last 10+ years in linux... that is what allowed me to drop windows completely. I still needed dual booting for games after I made the switch to developing full time on linux. Back then WINE was not as good as it is now, and we certainly did not have all the native titles that we do now.

Admittedly, gaming development may not have been as strong all those years, but part of that is the fact it helps a lot when the system you are coding on can execute and test the program you are writing. It can be frustrating waiting for compiles... no one wants to add the time necessary to reboot into a different OS just to test.

EDIT: All those reboots just to play a game was a huge factor to me. It weighed heavily on my personal decision not to buy all the shiny new windows titles. Especially when getting an off-hours call and having to immediately save the game I was playing (assuming I was at a point I could save) and reboot back to linux just to solve a quick problem. (Compared to now when I generally just swap out the game and leave it running in the background.)

Back then when the Humble Indie Bundle first appeared, and the games supported linux, it was a no-brainer. I was sold, and that really became the point where I never had to dual boot again.

My story to the smallest details.
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