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Update: The developer did change their mind and it's now on GOG for Linux.

Original article:

Supraland released for Linux on Steam on July 2nd and it just released on GOG today but it seems the Linux version will not be heading to GOG.

What is Supraland? It's a very highly rated first-person action and puzzle game, inspired by the likes of Zelda, Metroid and Portal. It's popular, with an "Overwhelmingly Positive" rating on Steam from over two thousands user reviews and from my time spent in the demo, I can see why as it was pretty sweet.

Speaking in their official Discord server, users questioned the developer to find out about a possible Linux release on GOG, since it's only available for Windows there currently. The reply was a little…unexpected:

Their further comments on it were a little more reasonable and understandable, mostly mentioning lower sales on Linux and again on GOG. Even so, that's a pretty naive and hostile attitude to take towards a store (GOG) and platform (Linux) both of which you only just started supporting.

After speaking to the developer myself, they said it was taken out of context (not that I see how, I followed the whole conversation personally). In reply to the same user who also posted this information on GOG, the developer said:

With the "for the sake of it" comment I was refering to a case of "I will only buy on gog because I want it DRM-free" but it IS DRM-free on Steam since forever. This ignorance and "for the sake of it" attitude made me a little angry.
I have not a single bad thought about gog.

They moved onto saying the Linux version performs poorly compared to the Windows version, saying it's better in Proton (which they also said slightly differently on the GOG forum and here too) so they don't want to give "a version that is inferior for reasons I cannot change". So, they're basically telling people on GOG to use Wine/Proton.

So for now, if you want to play the Linux version of Supraland, it's sadly Steam only. Although, going by their other comments it seems they're not confident on actually keeping the Linux version up.

Supra Games are also currently crowdfunding for Supraland 2 on Kickstarter, which is confirmed to be coming to Linux as well.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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120 comments
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x_wing 11 Jul, 2019
Quoting: ShmerlNot sure if it means manual backup, since they say "Please see the Using the Steam Backup Feature topic", which implies they mean using their tool. I'd say, at best it's very ambiguous.

Ok, lets says it is ambiguous. Still, where is written that you can't do a backup copy of your SteamApps?
Shmerl 11 Jul, 2019
Quoting: x_wingOk, lets says it is ambiguous. Still, where is written that you can't do a backup copy of your SteamApps?

I posted that above about using the client. I read it as unless they let you, you have to use the client. So you'd need to find an explicit permission.

Copyright stuff commonly works using explicit, not implicit scope. I.e. if it's not said - it's not covered.


Last edited by Shmerl on 11 July 2019 at 6:02 pm UTC
x_wing 11 Jul, 2019
Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: x_wingOk, lets says it is ambiguous. Still, where is written that you can't do a backup copy of your SteamApps?

I posted that above about using the client. I read it as unless they let you, you have to use the client. So you'd need to find an explicit permission.

As I already quoted, it reads "you may be required". It's a conditional requirement for the usage of their Content and Services. In other words, if you can run it without the client running, then you're fine.

If the purpose of that statement was to empathize that they should explicitly allow you to use it then I think that it should have read: "To make use of the Content and Services you must have a Steam Account and if Steam explicitly allows, you may not require running the Steam client and maintaining a connection to the Internet" (tried to keep it as much lawyer-lexic, my apologies if it is not well expressed)

Kinda pointless to keep this discussion. You definitely have a very narrow opinion regarding Steam.

Quoting: ShmerlCopyright stuff commonly works using explicit, not implicit scope. I.e. if it's not said - it's not covered.

It also should be explicit that you're not allowed to do something.


Last edited by x_wing on 11 July 2019 at 6:35 pm UTC
Shmerl 11 Jul, 2019
Quoting: x_wingAs I already quoted, it reads "you may be required". It's a conditional requirement for the usage of their Content and Services. In other words, if you can run it without the client running, then you're fine.

It's not clear what "may be" refers to. But other points are explicit:

QuoteTo make use of the Content and Services, you must have a Steam Account and you may be required to be running the Steam client and maintaining a connection to the Internet. <...>
Except as otherwise permitted under this Agreement (including any Subscription Terms or Rules of Use), or under applicable law notwithstanding these restrictions, you may not, in whole or in part, copy, photocopy, reproduce, publish, distribute, translate, reverse engineer, derive source code from, modify, disassemble, decompile, create derivative works based on, or remove any proprietary notices or labels from the Content and Services or any software accessed via Steam without the prior consent, in writing, of Valve.

I.e. they stress that only what's the agreement allows is permitted, so you can't extrapolate anything implicitly, like I said above. I don't see from the agreement that you can make backups without the client. And let alone use them, if your account is gone (which can happen if Steam shuts down or simply cancels your account).

Quoting: x_wingIt also should be explicit that you're not allowed to do something.

Usually the opposite. Copyright allows only what's explicitly specified. Negative parts of the agreement are aimed at reducing what you can normally do by law.


Last edited by Shmerl on 11 July 2019 at 6:48 pm UTC
x_wing 11 Jul, 2019
Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: x_wingAs I already quoted, it reads "you may be required". It's a conditional requirement for the usage of their Content and Services. In other words, if you can run it without the client running, then you're fine.

It's not clear what "may be" refers to. But other points are explicit:

QuoteTo make use of the Content and Services, you must have a Steam Account and you may be required to be running the Steam client and maintaining a connection to the Internet. <...>
Except as otherwise permitted under this Agreement (including any Subscription Terms or Rules of Use), or under applicable law notwithstanding these restrictions, you may not, in whole or in part, copy, photocopy, reproduce, publish, distribute, translate, reverse engineer, derive source code from, modify, disassemble, decompile, create derivative works based on, or remove any proprietary notices or labels from the Content and Services or any software accessed via Steam without the prior consent, in writing, of Valve.

I.e. they stress that only what's the agreement allows is permitted, so you can't extrapolate anything implicitly, like I said above. I don't see from the agreement that you can make backups without the client. And let alone use them, if your account is gone (which can happen if Steam shuts down or simply cancels your account).

Does the agreement explicitly says that they only allows the execution of games using their client? I know it sounds ambiguous (for example, "you may" is also use for the minimum age), but in other languages is very explicit. I mean, age limit is a must and Steam client use is stated as optional in Spanish (for instance). Regarding the backup, they give a writing consent to copy and backup your SteamApps in the link I shared (that's an official write permission from them to every user that reads that guide).

Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: x_wingIt also should be explicit that you're not allowed to do something.

Usually the opposite. Copyright allows only what's explicitly specified. Negative parts of the agreement are aimed at reducing what you can normally do by law.

Still, they explicitly says that you may be able to use Content and Services without their Client or an Internet connection.
Shmerl 11 Jul, 2019
Quoting: x_wingStill, they explicitly says that you may be able to use Content and Services without their Client or an Internet connection.

Without saying when. So you can't extrapolate from there. Basically they can interpret that like they want. So for the user it basically is equal to "you can't, unless we told you you can".

Even if you argue you can ask them to clarify the ambiguity, the worse part is the account presence issue. One of the points of DRM-free purchase is ability to use what you bought even if the store shuts down. Requirement to have an account prevents you from legally doing it.


Last edited by Shmerl on 11 July 2019 at 8:01 pm UTC
marcus 11 Jul, 2019
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Quoting: ShmerlWithout saying when. So you can't extrapolate from there. Basically they can interpret that like they want. So for the user it basically is equal to "you can't, unless we told you you can".

This is not true and you are arguing yourself into a corner here. According to your interpretation of laws you can not make a backup of GOG games either. I don't find the word "Backup" in their user agreement either ....
Shmerl 11 Jul, 2019
Quoting: marcusThis is not true and you are arguing yourself into a corner here.

It's included in these points:

QuoteWe give you and other GOG users the personal right (known legally as a 'licence') to use GOG services and to download, access and/or stream (depending on the content) and use GOG content. This licence is for your personal use. We can stop or suspend this licence in some situations, which are explained later on.

You have the personal right to use GOG content and services. This right can be suspended or stopped by us in some situations.
----------

It seems very unlikely, but if we have to stop providing access to GOG services and GOG content permanently (not because of any breach by you), we will try to give you at least sixty (60) days advance notice by posting a note on www.gog.com and sending an email to every registered users – during that time you should be able to download any GOG content you purchased.

In the very unlikely situation that we have to stop running GOG we'll do our best to give you advance notice, so that you can download and safely store all your DRM-free content.

Backups are personal use, and second part shows that you can use them, even if the service shuts down.


Last edited by Shmerl on 11 July 2019 at 9:04 pm UTC
x_wing 12 Jul, 2019
Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: x_wingStill, they explicitly says that you may be able to use Content and Services without their Client or an Internet connection.

Without saying when. So you can't extrapolate from there. Basically they can interpret that like they want. So for the user it basically is equal to "you can't, unless we told you you can".

Even if you argue you can ask them to clarify the ambiguity, the worse part is the account presence issue. One of the points of DRM-free purchase is ability to use what you bought even if the store shuts down. Requirement to have an account prevents you from legally doing it.

Lets stop playing this game of "what if" and "what I understand" and lets go for the facts:

  • It's a fact that you can backup your games by just copying your library folder (Steam doesn't prevent or invalidates your games data)
  • It's a fact that running the client in order to run a games is optional, if not developers would not be allowed to release games without that feature

So, lets say that GOG and Steam cease to exist. What would be the difference between having a Steam game copy that works without the client and the GOG installer? Don't know you, but I don't need a piece of paper that tells me that I'm allowed to play something I purchased.

The fact is that no matter the source, both of us will always be able to play any DRM-free content.


Last edited by x_wing on 12 July 2019 at 1:02 am UTC
Shmerl 12 Jul, 2019
Quoting: x_wingLets stop playing this game of "what if" and "what I understand" and lets go for the facts:

Indeed, I see no point in further refuting your wrong claims that contradict the TOS which says you need Steam account to be allowed to use their games. You can show me the source which says that Steam allows you doing backups and using them without Steam account. Or otherwise let's move on to other topics, because I'm not going to agree with you.


Last edited by Shmerl on 12 July 2019 at 1:05 am UTC
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