Support us on Patreon to keep GamingOnLinux alive. This ensures we have no timed articles and no paywalls. Just good, fresh content! Alternatively, you can donate through Paypal, Flattr and Liberapay!

Update: The developer did change their mind and it's now on GOG for Linux.

Original article:

Supraland released for Linux on Steam on July 2nd and it just released on GOG today but it seems the Linux version will not be heading to GOG.

What is Supraland? It's a very highly rated first-person action and puzzle game, inspired by the likes of Zelda, Metroid and Portal. It's popular, with an "Overwhelmingly Positive" rating on Steam from over two thousands user reviews and from my time spent in the demo, I can see why as it was pretty sweet.

Speaking in their official Discord server, users questioned the developer to find out about a possible Linux release on GOG, since it's only available for Windows there currently. The reply was a little…unexpected:

Their further comments on it were a little more reasonable and understandable, mostly mentioning lower sales on Linux and again on GOG. Even so, that's a pretty naive and hostile attitude to take towards a store (GOG) and platform (Linux) both of which you only just started supporting.

After speaking to the developer myself, they said it was taken out of context (not that I see how, I followed the whole conversation personally). In reply to the same user who also posted this information on GOG, the developer said:

With the "for the sake of it" comment I was refering to a case of "I will only buy on gog because I want it DRM-free" but it IS DRM-free on Steam since forever. This ignorance and "for the sake of it" attitude made me a little angry.
I have not a single bad thought about gog.

They moved onto saying the Linux version performs poorly compared to the Windows version, saying it's better in Proton (which they also said slightly differently on the GOG forum and here too) so they don't want to give "a version that is inferior for reasons I cannot change". So, they're basically telling people on GOG to use Wine/Proton.

So for now, if you want to play the Linux version of Supraland, it's sadly Steam only. Although, going by their other comments it seems they're not confident on actually keeping the Linux version up.

Supra Games are also currently crowdfunding for Supraland 2 on Kickstarter, which is confirmed to be coming to Linux as well.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
10 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more information here.
The comments on this article are closed.
120 comments
Page: «4/12»
  Go to:

kokoko3k 10 July 2019 at 7:24 am UTC
From what i've seen on videos on youtube, game performs equally bad on windows and linux.
I'm getting similar results to what i see, on a gtx 750ti 2gb and a gtx 1060 3gb.
Thr only difference i've found is that it is prone to crash on the 750ti.
Running via proton brings very similar performance, maybe a bit "laggier" but does not crash on the 750ti.

An example here, it struggles to reach 60fps ona 1060 (on an Intel Core i7 7700, definitely better than my i5-4590) even after lowering the resolution to 85%
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1S0fAPqUilE

Windows users complaining:
https://steamcommunity.com/app/813630/discussions/0/3726075043723768527/

...i'm not sure what dev is talking about, really.


Last edited by kokoko3k at 10 July 2019 at 7:30 am UTC
Beamboom 10 July 2019 at 7:26 am UTC
eldakingThis is just a PR disaster.

This is exactly it. Some devs should just stay off handling what they perceive as complaints.

And it's not like GOG is "Linux heaven" either. Their hype is way waaaay too high in the Linux world.
TheSHEEEP 10 July 2019 at 8:19 am UTC
View PC info
  • Supporter
appetrosyanJust because YOU haven't put DRM in your game, by publishing on Steam you're restricting my ability to share it. For example, I can lend a GOG game to a friend. He can play the game at the same time as I am playing something else. I can't do that on Steam.
You can do exactly that with Steam, too. It's called Family Share. Been doing that many years with my GF for some games. She can play something from my lib while I play something else. Only requirement is that both have Steam, but since that is free, it's a non-issue.

liamdawe
TheBardDRM-Free on Steam does exist! When a game is DRM-Free on Steam, you don't need to login to play. You can even use steamcmd to install games without the client. Indeed it's a bit more complex that downloading a file from a website but actually it's more convenient because stemcmd deal with lots of stuff. When the download is complete, you can backup the game directly the way you want, move it where you want and play without Steam. I've tested it myself several times! Steam is not a DRM but Steam offer a DRM solution for the devs who want it. It's up to the devs to make their game DRM-Free or not on Steam.
I don't think saying users can learn steamcmd is a reasonable argument personally, for those who prefer fully DRM-free.
Something is not easy to use, so it isn't DRM-free? That's your argument?
I'm all for Steam adding a simple "Download as installer/archive" button or something along those lines to DRM-free games in their store, but not having that button doesn't make them games with DRM.

It really does depend on the dev if their Steam-version has DRM or not. Some games won't even start without Steam running (and being logged in, afaik). But others do (they might tell you achievements are not working, though), and I don't see how those can not be considered DRM-free.

Beamboom
eldakingThis is just a PR disaster.

This is exactly it. Some devs should just stay off handling what they perceive as complaints.
Meh, I'd rather have an honest dev that I don't agree with, than some community manager just trying to butter me up.


Last edited by TheSHEEEP at 10 July 2019 at 8:37 am UTC
Smoke39 10 July 2019 at 8:39 am UTC
TheSHEEEPI'm all for Steam adding a simple "Download as installer/archive" button or something along those lines to DRM-free games in their store
Is that not what this does?
image
ixnari 10 July 2019 at 8:44 am UTC
Smoke39
TheSHEEEPI'm all for Steam adding a simple "Download as installer/archive" button or something along those lines to DRM-free games in their store
Is that not what this does?
https://i.imgur.com/WaYnysr.png

Not really. It creates a backup archive, yes, but I believe it can only be extracted by the user who created it.


Last edited by ixnari at 10 July 2019 at 8:45 am UTC
WouldAvoidValveOnLinux 10 July 2019 at 8:48 am UTC
TheSHEEEPYou can do exactly that with Steam, too. It's called Family Share. Been doing that many years with my GF for some games. She can play something from my lib while I play something else. Only requirement is that both have Steam, but since that is free, it's a non-issue.
No. She would be kicked out of one of your games if you play a completely different game from your library. She has five minutes to wrap up any unfinished business. Now if she was playing a GOG game of your own and you play another GOG game, there is virtually nothing tracking either of you to make sure your GF can't play when you're playing a game...you don't even need to login to her PC and add it to your account, just give her the game installer and be on your merry way.

My sister has no issues playing GOG games while I play GOG games. If I play something from my valve account when she's playing something also from that account, I can't imagine things going as smoothly.


TheSHEEEP
liamdawe
TheBardDRM-Free on Steam does exist! When a game is DRM-Free on Steam, you don't need to login to play. You can even use steamcmd to install games without the client. Indeed it's a bit more complex that downloading a file from a website but actually it's more convenient because stemcmd deal with lots of stuff. When the download is complete, you can backup the game directly the way you want, move it where you want and play without Steam. I've tested it myself several times! Steam is not a DRM but Steam offer a DRM solution for the devs who want it. It's up to the devs to make their game DRM-Free or not on Steam.
I don't think saying users can learn steamcmd is a reasonable argument personally, for those who prefer fully DRM-free.
Something is not easy to use, so it isn't DRM-free? That's your argument?
I'm all for Steam adding a simple "Download as installer/archive" button or something along those lines to DRM-free games in their store, but not having that button doesn't make them games with DRM.

On GOG, the games are readily available as installers with no further work on your part. I download them, double click, then click install and sit back and enjoy. You're expecting users to be savvy enough to use steamcmd, let alone know it exists, for the pursuit of DRM-free.

Actually, scratch that. What makes GOG better than valve with DRM-free is that they guarantee their games are DRM-free. Valve does not, and will not mind if devs suddenly start using DRM in a later version of the game. Heck, they encourage the usage of valve DRM in their API documentation. Why would I trust the company which singlehandedly gimped the second hand and physical market for PC games and conditioned PC players to get used to online requirements screwery (all while their Xbox friends successfully rebelled) with DRM-free anything? They surely don't care about it as much as GOG, who, yes, they have their own issues, yes, they aren't always doing the best they could, but they are at the very least supporting it staunchly. So just because it is "DRM-free" on valve does not make it any more desirable than if it was truly DRM-free on GOG.


Last edited by WouldAvoidValveOnLinux at 10 July 2019 at 8:59 am UTC
liamdawe 10 July 2019 at 8:53 am UTC
TheSHEEEP
liamdawe
TheBardDRM-Free on Steam does exist! When a game is DRM-Free on Steam, you don't need to login to play. You can even use steamcmd to install games without the client. Indeed it's a bit more complex that downloading a file from a website but actually it's more convenient because stemcmd deal with lots of stuff. When the download is complete, you can backup the game directly the way you want, move it where you want and play without Steam. I've tested it myself several times! Steam is not a DRM but Steam offer a DRM solution for the devs who want it. It's up to the devs to make their game DRM-Free or not on Steam.
I don't think saying users can learn steamcmd is a reasonable argument personally, for those who prefer fully DRM-free.
Something is not easy to use, so it isn't DRM-free? That's your argument?
I'm all for Steam adding a simple "Download as installer/archive" button or something along those lines to DRM-free games in their store, but not having that button doesn't make them games with DRM.
I did not say it was or wasn't DRM-free, merely pointing out for the average user steamcmd is not a reasonable option ;), nothing more.
WouldAvoidValveOnLinux 10 July 2019 at 8:55 am UTC
Smoke39
TheSHEEEPI'm all for Steam adding a simple "Download as installer/archive" button or something along those lines to DRM-free games in their store
Is that not what this does?
https://i.imgur.com/WaYnysr.png

Not really. It creates a backup archive, yes, but I believe it can only be extracted by the user who created it. You can't even restore it offline. You need to be online with the client in order to actually restore games through it. If you want to back up files without them being bound to any specific account or internet connection, don't use the valve provided solution and use 7zip.

I checked this a couple days ago on the latest version of their client.

EDIT: removed double quote. Is using the site on mobile this finnicky or is it just me?


Last edited by WouldAvoidValveOnLinux at 10 July 2019 at 9:02 am UTC
callcifer 10 July 2019 at 9:00 am UTC
Sounds to me there is a lesson for GOG here as well:

QuoteBelieve it or not, Itch has some excellent developer tools. [...] You're going to need to be at least as fast and easy. Because even though Itch will let me take 100% of revenue, and has amazing tools that I recommend to everyone who will listen, I still find it a pain to go over to Yet Another Storefront and upload Yet Another Build whenever I issue a new patch.

You as Yet Another Storefront get this mental friction simply by existing. The deck is already stacked against you. All you can do is add as close to zero as possible to it.

Oh, and if you're designing your API? You need a really good reason for it to not look exactly like Steam's. Actually, no, you don't. There is no good reason. It needs to look exactly like Steam's, ideally being a drop-in replacement for the dll (copyright laws allowing). A developer needs to spend as close to zero seconds as possible reconfiguring their game for your system. If they have to recompile a special build just for you it's gonna be tough going.
TheSHEEEP 10 July 2019 at 9:15 am UTC
View PC info
  • Supporter
WouldAvoidValveOnLinux
TheSHEEEPYou can do exactly that with Steam, too. It's called Family Share. Been doing that many years with my GF for some games. She can play something from my lib while I play something else. Only requirement is that both have Steam, but since that is free, it's a non-issue.
No. She would be kicked out of one of your games if you play a completely different game from your library. She has five minutes to wrap up any unfinished business.
Then you obviously did it wrong.
Download game from the library, go offline, now you can play.
This obviously won't work for most online-games, but you shouldn't be able to play someone else's online games without buying them anyway.

WouldAvoidValveOnLinuxNow if she was playing a GOG game of your own and you play another GOG game, there is virtually nothing tracking either of you to make sure your GF can't play when you're playing a game...you don't even need to login to her PC and add it to your account, just give her the game installer and be on your merry way.
Oh, yeah, Steam's Family Sharing is user unfriendly and pretty much sucks (as many things in Steam do...), I won't disagree with that. But it IS possible to use it.

WouldAvoidValveOnLinux
TheSHEEEP
liamdawe
TheBardDRM-Free on Steam does exist! When a game is DRM-Free on Steam, you don't need to login to play. You can even use steamcmd to install games without the client. Indeed it's a bit more complex that downloading a file from a website but actually it's more convenient because stemcmd deal with lots of stuff. When the download is complete, you can backup the game directly the way you want, move it where you want and play without Steam. I've tested it myself several times! Steam is not a DRM but Steam offer a DRM solution for the devs who want it. It's up to the devs to make their game DRM-Free or not on Steam.
I don't think saying users can learn steamcmd is a reasonable argument personally, for those who prefer fully DRM-free.
Something is not easy to use, so it isn't DRM-free? That's your argument?
I'm all for Steam adding a simple "Download as installer/archive" button or something along those lines to DRM-free games in their store, but not having that button doesn't make them games with DRM.

On GOG, the games are readily available as installers with no further work on your part. I download them, double click, then click install and sit back and enjoy. You're expecting users to be savvy enough to use steamcmd, let alone know it exists, for the pursuit of DRM-free.
I'm not expecting users to do anything, I'm just saying that ease-of-use has nothing to do with DRM or no DRM.
The matter of fact is that there are DRM-free games on Steam.

TheSHEEEPWhat makes GOG better than valve with DRM-free is that they guarantee their games are DRM-free. Valve does not, and will not mind if devs suddenly start using DRM in a later version of the game.
That is true. If being DRM-free is someone's primary concern, they are better off with GOG.
Though only on Windows, as GOG on Linux, well... You really have to value DRM-free extremely to want to use GOG's crappy slow installers and lack of auto-updates and everything else Steam/Galaxy offers...


Last edited by TheSHEEEP at 10 July 2019 at 9:19 am UTC
  Go to:
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on Patreon, Liberapay or Paypal. We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams
See more!
Popular this week
View by Category
Contact
Latest Comments
Latest Forum Posts