Support us on Patreon to keep GamingOnLinux alive. This ensures we have no timed articles and no paywalls. Just good, fresh content! Alternatively, you can donate through Paypal, Flattr and Liberapay!

Steam Hardware Survey For March 2015

Posted by , | Views: 10,123
Another month, and another Steam Hardware Survey has been released. This time we have gained a little rather than lost a little.

To the numbers:

Linux results for March 2015
Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS 64 bit 0.31% +0.24%
Ubuntu 14.10 64 bit 0.15% +0.01%
Linux Mint 17.1 Rebecca 64 bit 0.11% +0.02%
Linux 3.10 64 bit 0.09% +0.01%
Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS 64 bit 0.06% -0.24%

Total: 1.06% +0.04%
Last Month: 1.02%

My thoughts on it

A little increase for Linux this month and the usual changes for Mint, Ubuntu and the distros that report themselves as "Linux 3.10".

The real interesting thing to see here is that, again, only 64bit distributions are shown. The number of Linux users on Steam hasn't changed too much since the beginning, so is 64bit just gaining more popularity with Linux gamers? I personally sure hope so, as the "death" of 32bit is something I've been expecting for a while to finally happen.

Important things to remember

Be aware these results will probably not be that accurate as we don't know how they do their percentage results, they could be rounding up, rounding down or truncating the percentages. So a 0.5% could actually be nearly 0.6% as it could be 0.59% but they could do no rounding and simply truncate it.

Also remember it is a survey, so it won't ask every single one of you to do it. It would only be truly accurate if it did it behind the scenes, but that's not what a survey is for this is just to get a general idea.

Final Note: Look at it this way, Steam has around 100 million active users, 1% of 100 million is about 1,000,000 (1 million) people. What developer wouldn't want to hook into a market that big? Of course it doesn't mean they are guaranteed that amount of sales, but it's something fun to remember.

See the Hardware Survey on Steam here. Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
0 Likes
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more information here.
The comments on this article are closed.
24 comments
Page: «3/3
  Go to:

mao_dze_dun 13 April 2015 at 10:21 pm UTC
scaine
maodzedun
KimyrielleI am actually surprised that the numbers aren't going up more noticeably compared to 1-2 years ago, since it was always thought that the lack of games would be one of the major reasons holding back Linux growth. With all the games now available, one should think this is less of a factor now - but we're still around the 1% margin we always have been at. Maybe the Steam machines will do something about it.

Overwhelmingly larger Windows catalogue (for AAA games), crap performance from AMD hardware in Linux and abysmal from Intel, inability to use a lot of software, a sheet long list of distros that will totally confuse any new commer, Unity Launcher in the most popular distribution, overall higher level of tech knowledge required to use Linux...

Well, you started off pretty strong there. Some good points. Perhaps you should have stopped before you got into murky waters of Unity-hate and blatant opinion on the ease of use of Linux or the toxicity of the user base.

But I'll bite anyway. Care to expand on what you think users won't like about the Unity Launcher? Be specific. As I say, I've been an Ubuntu user a long time and I agree that the 11.04 and 11.10 iterations were raw - I tended to revert my use of those versions back to... oh, I can't remember the name of it now... Docker? Something like that. But by 12.04, Unity Launcher was solid and since 15.04 is about to launch, that means that I've been using this Launcher for nearly 3 years and had no idea it was somehow magically "bad".

What's wrong with it?

Canonical took the worst from Windows' taskbar and OSX's dock and stuffed it into the Unity Launcher. You can't change it's position and you can't get rid of it - so much for Linux's flexibility. Also there is no Show Desktop button by default. It has no preview thumbnails and no click to minimize unless you force them (sort of) with Compiz. We're talking about basic Windows functionality, let alone comparing it to something as flexible as KDE for example. If they allowed me to get rid of the launcher for real, I'd just slap a Cairo dock or something and be a happy camper, but as it is - it's absolutely horrible.
scaine 13 April 2015 at 10:36 pm UTC
View PC info
  • Contributing Editor
  • Supporter
  • Top Supporter
maodzedun
scaineBut I'll bite anyway. Care to expand on what you think users won't like about the Unity Launcher? Be specific. As I say, I've been an Ubuntu user a long time and I agree that the 11.04 and 11.10 iterations were raw - I tended to revert my use of those versions back to... oh, I can't remember the name of it now... Docker? Something like that. But by 12.04, Unity Launcher was solid and since 15.04 is about to launch, that means that I've been using this Launcher for nearly 3 years and had no idea it was somehow magically "bad".

What's wrong with it?

Canonical took the worst from Windows' taskbar and OSX's dock and stuffed it into the Unity Launcher. You can't change it's position and you can't get rid of it - so much for Linux's flexibility. Also there is no Show Desktop button by default. It has no preview thumbnails and no click to minimize unless you force them (sort of) with Compiz. We're talking about basic Windows functionality, let alone comparing it to something as flexible as KDE for example. If they allowed me to get rid of the launcher for real, I'd just slap a Cairo dock or something and be a happy camper, but as it is - it's absolutely horrible.

Those are the pretty much the features that makes Unity so appealing to its target audience. I was willing to change my outlook to accommodate the Launchers way of working and it's wonderful when you do so. If you simply berate it for two of its strongest features, no wonder you'll hate it. Sounds like you're not the target audience though, so nothing is really lost, right?

For the avoidance of doubt - here's a brief breakdown.

You can't move it for many reasons. Best use of screen space, assumptions can be made about layout, fits with the phone/touch paradigm, code base is significantly simpler. With hindsight, the phone paradigm is the main winner here.

You only switch to windows and don't minimise them because there's fewer things more frustrating in Windows that clicking on the icon of a hidden but non-minimised window and waiting for it to appear, only to later realise it's now minimised. This is broken. Canonical fixed it. Hell, Gnome fixed this by doing away with the concept of minimise, didn't they? Or at least, they were going to. Have they done that yet? Fingers crossed.

Show desktop isn't a button the Launcher any more. But what's to stop you from turning it on, exactly? Settings/Appearance, Behaviour, click on "Add show desktop icon to the launcher".

Can't argue about previews - there's no option for that. I don't think even the Compiz previews add-on works properly. If that's a deal breaker, then so be it.

But yeah. Lots of hate (and not just you!) for something that is very tidily and specifically designed to be what it is. I'm not saying you should like it, really, but a lot of the complaints about it revolve around people who literally can't see past the fact that it's on the left. Just that.

But if their incredibly ambitious vision is to work, then Launcher on the left it is. Just for once, I'm willing to change to accommodate Linux, when for many years, Linux changed to accommodate me.
tuubi 14 April 2015 at 7:43 am UTC
View PC info
  • Supporter
scaineYou can't move it for many reasons. Best use of screen space, assumptions can be made about layout, fits with the phone/touch paradigm, code base is significantly simpler. With hindsight, the phone paradigm is the main winner here.
Why would I want my mouse-and-keyboard controlled desktop with a large monitor to work like a phone with a tiny touch screen, especially when I'm not the least bit interested in getting an Ubuntu phone? I'd get it if this was an alternate UI or something, but for the default UI of a mainstream desktop distro this sounds just a bit insane. This is the kind of "shut up you like it if we say you like it" design I very much dislike when practiced by MS and especially Apple.

So yeah, I don't like Unity at all either, but I don't mind that others do. It's mostly a matter of preference after all.

scaineBut if their incredibly ambitious vision is to work, then Launcher on the left it is. Just for once, I'm willing to change to accommodate Linux, when for many years, Linux changed to accommodate me.
Be fair. It's Ubuntu you're accommodating, not Linux.
STiAT 14 April 2015 at 10:16 pm UTC
EikeSteam already has 125 million users (the same number as the inhabitants of Japan, from baby to geezer...) meaning the increase of 4 percent has to be multiplied with 25% (comparing with the time of 100 million users). Steam users explosion is eating up most of Linux users rise...

Nevertheless, the figures which speak are the numbers, never the percentage. This just means that the distribution of Linux, and Marketshare is still at about 1 % in the gaming market.

Though, the 1 % of 125 Million users is still 1.2 Million Linux users, which is a potential target group.

I think that's one of the reasons some studios specialize on porting games: Developing a game (including storywriting, scripting, graphics) is much more effort than only the engine, especially if they support OpenGL / Vulkan in the future. Therefore, there's pretty some money to make for only doing part of the work (and that's basically the deal they have with Publishers, a revenue-split at 30 % distribution platform as Steam, 20 % port, 50 % the content creator).

This is one of the reasons we see so many ports on engines we already do have games ported on. The ports don't take that much effort anymore, and generate cash flow. If you look at the games released, you'll see pretty much always games based on the same engines being ported, and it's no accident that studios having ported a game on one engine get more contracts on other games on the same engine.

If they only reach a sales of like 5-10 % of the Linux group, they'll be well out.
  Go to:
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on Patreon, Liberapay or Paypal. We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams
See more!
Popular this week
View by Category
Contact
Latest Comments
Latest Forum Posts