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OpenRA will finally be letting you save your single-player games in the coming release, along with more helpful features it's looking good.

As a reminder: OpenRA is a free and open source game engine, developed to allow you to play Command & Conquer, Red Alert and Dune 2000 with Tiberian Sun coming eventually. You don't need to buy them either, since EA made them all free years ago. It's a very impressive game engine and already works beautifully in single-player and online but it doesn't have all the missions implemented from the campaigns just yet.

The next release they've written about, will be adding in the "most wanted missing feature" allowing you to save both skirmish games and missions in the campaigns. This is fantastic as some missions can take quite a while to do, having to blast through them in one go is not great.

Spectator UI is also seeing improvements, the side-bar for Command & Conquer went through a complete overhaul to look better and they improved building placement previews too:

That new side-bar is a huge improvement, looks much more fitting for the original game.

On top of all that map previews were polished up to look closer to how they actually are in-game. One feature I found especially helpful is the new ability to set the select the approach vector for things like paratroopers. This little bit of fine-tuning makes me really appreciate how OpenRA continues to make such classic games feel more modern.

Further improvements include: a removal of the Mono requirement for the Linux AppImage; a new time limit lobby option for multiplayer and skirmish games; fixes for queued unit orders, aircraft, and harvesters; new tweaks and traits for modders along with more bug and performance improvements.

Seems like this is going to be one of the best OpenRA releases yet, exciting!

You can see their news post here. Want to just download and play? They have a handy AppImage on the downloads page that should work across many distributions.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
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The comments on this article are closed.
5 comments

lqe5433 7 Jun, 2019
It uses now 100% .net core?
Klaas 7 Jun, 2019
Quoting: lqe5433It uses now 100% .net core?

The changelog on GitHub gives the impression that they include the mono runtime in the Linux and Mac builds. So it should probably say “no system mono required“.
Liam Dawe 7 Jun, 2019
Quoting: Klaas
Quoting: lqe5433It uses now 100% .net core?

The changelog on GitHub gives the impression that they include the mono runtime in the Linux and Mac builds. So it should probably say “no system mono required“.
Pfft semantics, it doesn't require you to have Mono so it's still correct.
Klaas 7 Jun, 2019
Quoting: liamdawePfft semantics, it doesn't require you to have Mono so it's still correct.
Unless you compile it from source.

Look at my Perpetual Motion Machine it runs forever without any additional energy and I can even power other things from it.
Spoiler, click me
Please ignore the motor that keeps it running.
Liam Dawe 7 Jun, 2019
Fine, I've made it clearer. I was simply following what they said.
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