Support us on Patreon to keep GamingOnLinux alive. This ensures we have no timed articles and no paywalls. Just good, fresh content! Alternatively, you can donate through PayPal, Liberapay or Buy us a Coffee. You can also buy games using our partner links for GOG and Humble Store.
For those wanting to listen to the actual talk Jason Ekstrand from Intel did about Vulkan you can now watch the video.

QuoteVulkan is the new next-generation graphics API from Khronos that is meant to replace OpenGL for many high-performance graphics applications. The talk will focus on three main topics: The Vulkan API itself, the impact of of the Vulkan API on open-source software including both open-source applications and running closed-source applications on open-source operating systems, and support of Vulkan APIs in open-source drivers on Intel platforms.



Click here to see it if you don't see the HTML5 video embed above.

Thanks to lucinos in the forum for pointing it out. Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Video, Vulkan
0 Likes
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
The comments on this article are closed.
8 comments

tony1ab 11 Feb, 2016
Less talk about vulkan and more games using it!
neowiz73 11 Feb, 2016
that makes a lot more sense now, so Vulkan can use multiple different types of drivers at the same time without any extra overhead like it is for bumblebee. that's going to be a big deal with laptops and could be a big benefit to desktops as well, because in fact we will be able to use multiple GPUs from different manufacturers at the same time.
wvstolzing 11 Feb, 2016
Quoting: tony1abLess talk about vulkan and more games using it!

Patience, young one!
stan 11 Feb, 2016
  • Supporter
That’s a nice presentation. But when comparing OpenGL and Vulkan he focussed on GL 1/2 and I wonder how it compares with recent GL and the so-called AZDO techniques ("approaching zero driver overhead"). Also nvidia has just released their libglvnd to enable several GL drivers to work at the same time (https://github.com/NVIDIA/libglvnd).
amonobeax 11 Feb, 2016
It'd be really interesting to see Developers aiming Win7 users having to use Vulkan in order to provide features that M$ would only release with DX12/Windows 10.

How cool would that be? Vulkan would be interesting cause all win7 users would still be using DX11 and locked with it.


Unfortunately M$ is already doing everything on their power to make ppl switch by force... so maybe this won't matter.

Here's the statistics right now ( http://store.steampowered.com/hwsurvey/directx/ )
Win10 looks fine, BUT there's still ~65% of the market without DX12. Which I guess is awesome to us.


Last edited by amonobeax on 11 February 2016 at 6:19 pm UTC
Nel 11 Feb, 2016
@ amonobeax

On steam, Windows 10 is around 36% of Windows userbase:
http://store.steampowered.com/hwsurvey?platform=pc
minj 11 Feb, 2016
This actually depressed me. Everything concrete is NDA'd, they keep shuffling their feet regarding any dates. There will hardly be any usable tools ready on launch. Apple's stance and support is unknown(?).

So as I see it, Vulkan will be viable for games only in ~2018 and the question still remains how attractive and competitive it will be compared to other APIs that are more established and available today: DX11, DX12 and even OpenGL. Mobile aside, why choose Vulkan if it can't even do OS X?
mirv 12 Feb, 2016
View PC info
  • Supporter Plus
Quoting: stanThat’s a nice presentation. But when comparing OpenGL and Vulkan he focussed on GL 1/2 and I wonder how it compares with recent GL and the so-called AZDO techniques ("approaching zero driver overhead"). Also nvidia has just released their libglvnd to enable several GL drivers to work at the same time (https://github.com/NVIDIA/libglvnd).

Full AZDO requires certain assumptions about how data is accessed, and is not suitable for every OpenGL program. Vulkan covers a lot more use cases. Later revisions of GL are still very much state-based. Even if a lot of work has been done to move away from it, the core of GL is still there - a big state machine that's unsuitable to threaded environments.

libglvnd is also for basically redirecting libGL access on a screen by screen basis. Vulkan can (in theory, let's see how well it will work in practice) so this on an application by application basis. It's also designed from an API level to allow multiple vendor implementations to co-exist, and so is much more useful from a cross-platform perspective than an X-window extension.
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Patreon, Liberapay or PayPal Donation.

We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
The comments on this article are closed.