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Lookout! Another sale is approaching! This time it's Valve's turn, with Steam having a space themed sale for the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.

Some of the Linux native games on sale:

See the special sales page here. Additionally, there's a lot more space themed games on sale that aren't on that page, find them here.

There's actually some really good deals there, quite a few games at really low prices. This is coming only soon after their huge summer sale, it seems every store does a sale for every theme possible now, not that I am complaining it's good for my and your bank balance of course.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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31 comments
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chancho_zombie 19 July 2019 at 12:24 am UTC
The most interesting stuff for us technology fans is that the Apollo 11 set the basis for the first computers by today standards it's more like a calculator, but nevertheless it was one of the first microchips.

I wonder if it is possible to run Linux on it.

the RAM memory is not even bits it's 2048 words. I don't know it's even slim for damn small linux.


Last edited by chancho_zombie at 19 July 2019 at 12:37 am UTC
F.Ultra 19 July 2019 at 12:29 am UTC
chancho_zombie
Purple Library Guy
F.UltraThe Russians landed a rocket (Luna 2) on the Moon in 1959.
With people in it?

the Russians got it all wrong we are not going to conquer the universe sending dogs and space monkeys.

Don't tell the French :-)

QuoteAnimals had been used in aeronautic exploration since 1783 when the Montgolfier brothers sent a sheep, a duck, and a rooster aloft in a hot air balloon to see if ground-dwelling animals can survive
F.Ultra 19 July 2019 at 12:33 am UTC
chancho_zombieThe most interesting stuff for us technology enthusiasts is that the Apollo 11 set the basis for the first computers by today standards it's more like a calculator, but nevertheless it was one of the first microchips.

I wonder if it is possible to run Linux on it.

the RAM memory is not even bits it's 2048 words. I don't know it's even slim for damn small linux.

And the ROM was Core Rope Memory, aka they had old ladies knitting 1:s and 0:s with magnetic rope which NASA jokingly called LOL (Little Old Lady) Memory

https://authors.library.caltech.edu/5456/1/hrst.mit.edu/hrs/apollo/public/visual3.htm

And here is the source code, it was all written and edited on paper:
image


Last edited by F.Ultra at 19 July 2019 at 12:34 am UTC
chancho_zombie 19 July 2019 at 12:42 am UTC
F.Ultra
chancho_zombieThe most interesting stuff for us technology enthusiasts is that the Apollo 11 set the basis for the first computers by today standards it's more like a calculator, but nevertheless it was one of the first microchips.

I wonder if it is possible to run Linux on it.

the RAM memory is not even bits it's 2048 words. I don't know it's even slim for damn small linux.

And the ROM was Core Rope Memory, aka they had old ladies knitting 1:s and 0:s with magnetic rope which NASA jokingly called LOL (Little Old Lady) Memory

https://authors.library.caltech.edu/5456/1/hrst.mit.edu/hrs/apollo/public/visual3.htm

And here is the source code, it was all written and edited on paper:
image

well yes then the wikipedia article is incorrect it's not RAM it's ROM. But it is a microchip.

image



EDIT: Wwwow I thought you were being ironic, hahah real old ladies made the Apollo Computer ROM memory, amazing.!


Last edited by chancho_zombie at 19 July 2019 at 12:50 am UTC
chancho_zombie 19 July 2019 at 1:13 am UTC
On the other hand it looks like the Russians didn't have much success with their computers their Argon System weighted 92 kg (202 lb) (the Apollo weigthed 30 kg, or 70 lb) and it was developed on 1969 http://www.computer-museum.ru/english/argon1.htm
The RAM capacity was 512 words. The soviets were always playing catch up.


Last edited by chancho_zombie at 19 July 2019 at 1:31 am UTC
Purple Library Guy 19 July 2019 at 2:26 am UTC
chancho_zombieOn the other hand it looks like the Russians didn't have much success with their computers their Argon System weighted 92 kg (202 lb) (the Apollo weigthed 30 kg, or 70 lb) and it was developed on 1969 http://www.computer-museum.ru/english/argon1.htm
The RAM capacity was 512 words. The soviets were always playing catch up.
Considering Russia had always been considered a really backward country by everyone in Europe, they didn't do that bad. And they stayed serious about space far longer than the Americans did; even when their economy imploded in the 90s they still did their best to limp along (which is why the US ended up having to hitch rides with them for years until Spacex got off the ground). I think the Russians still have a place in their heart for old fashioned manned space exploration that runs a lot deeper than the North American equivalent.
Meanwhile I suspect the Chinese don't really care--they're just doing it so they can say "We're a leading country now, we've got space capabilities like the big boys, so there!"
vlademir1 19 July 2019 at 3:02 am UTC
Purple Library GuyMeanwhile I suspect the Chinese don't really care--they're just doing it so they can say "We're a leading country now, we've got space capabilities like the big boys, so there!"
That's also the story behind the current push to the moon by India. It's not so very different than the political motivations behind the original US/Soviet push to the moon either. Personally I couldn't care less about the national motivations to fund space exploration, well as long as unlike a significant segment of the US they don't include massive defunding efforts, provided the people doing the actual work are motivated by the science and/or the steady march of human progress more than by the jingoistic competitive BS that moves national policy most places that try.
chancho_zombie 19 July 2019 at 4:01 am UTC
Purple Library Guy
chancho_zombieOn the other hand it looks like the Russians didn't have much success with their computers their Argon System weighted 92 kg (202 lb) (the Apollo weigthed 30 kg, or 70 lb) and it was developed on 1969 http://www.computer-museum.ru/english/argon1.htm
The RAM capacity was 512 words. The soviets were always playing catch up.
Considering Russia had always been considered a really backward country by everyone in Europe, they didn't do that bad. And they stayed serious about space far longer than the Americans did; even when their economy imploded in the 90s they still did their best to limp along (which is why the US ended up having to hitch rides with them for years until Spacex got off the ground). I think the Russians still have a place in their heart for old fashioned manned space exploration that runs a lot deeper than the North American equivalent.
Meanwhile I suspect the Chinese don't really care--they're just doing it so they can say "We're a leading country now, we've got space capabilities like the big boys, so there!"

yes some things about the soviets like this stuff are impressive, it was lagging behind a lot but still it was a completely different beast and computing architecture. Most likely some stuff is copied but it looks as most of it as an independent development. Makes me wonder that maybe in a dystopian USRR they could probably develop their own computers that could rival the ones we have now. Another thing that I recon the soviets it's defeating the nazis (in their country). And other stuff is their jet engine industry, some companies are still using soviet technology these days like the Antonov an 225 and still do the job.

But still that doesn't change my overall negative opinion on the soviets, on latin america they brought us the guerrilla, and funded the Cubans, and the Cuban militias trained local guerrillas like the ones we had here (montoneros), so I have a very negative opinion on the soviets.
(Sorry if I'm being off-topic)


Last edited by chancho_zombie at 19 July 2019 at 4:18 am UTC
vector 19 July 2019 at 4:44 am UTC
chancho_zombiethe Russians got it all wrong we are not going to conquer the universe sending dogs and space monkeys.
Microorganisms, then?
---

I'm all for humans getting off this rock, but I would hate to see willful neglect, territoriality, and greed perpetuated in space, beyond what has already occurred thus far (which is a pittance compared to the full potential of human wrong). Heedless pollution (necessitating more initiatives like CleanSpace One),[1] treatment as a playground for the wealthy, inadequate oversight of those who have designs on avariciously cannibalizing resources or expanding property holdings, etc. are not desirable outcomes to me.

I would hate to think that (far beyond my lifetime) there might be a profusion of Starbucks in space.[2]

[1] Even with great care, some pollution will always occur, but pollution can definitely be mitigated beyond what certain vested interests are inclined to do.
[2] Not to be confused with Starbuck; Kara Thrace version is my preference


Last edited by vector at 19 July 2019 at 4:53 am UTC
chancho_zombie 19 July 2019 at 6:42 am UTC
vector
chancho_zombiethe Russians got it all wrong we are not going to conquer the universe sending dogs and space monkeys.
Microorganisms, then?
---

I'm all for humans getting off this rock, but I would hate to see willful neglect, territoriality, and greed perpetuated in space, beyond what has already occurred thus far (which is a pittance compared to the full potential of human wrong). Heedless pollution (necessitating more initiatives like CleanSpace One),[1] treatment as a playground for the wealthy, inadequate oversight of those who have designs on avariciously cannibalizing resources or expanding property holdings, etc. are not desirable outcomes to me.

I would hate to think that (far beyond my lifetime) there might be a profusion of Starbucks in space.[2]

[1] Even with great care, some pollution will always occur, but pollution can definitely be mitigated beyond what certain vested interests are inclined to do.
[2] Not to be confused with Starbuck; Kara Thrace version is my preference

Probably microchips or robots, definitely not space monkeys or dogs. I think there is a project to send a nano probe with a laser beam at the speed of light to other galaxies.

and supporting Purple's statement, that Russians still have that "spaceman spirit" it's funded by a Russian millionaire.

hence there is even a Kickstarter campaign of another similar nanoprobe-project .

But there was something special, some colective human dream surronding the idea of getting to the moon and walking and "breathing" in the moon, I don't know maybe it has something to do with norse or greek mythology or maybe with religion? just look at this movie done in 1902


Last edited by chancho_zombie at 19 July 2019 at 8:01 am UTC
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