You can sign up to get a daily email of our articles, see the Mailing List page!
Support us on Patreon to keep GamingOnLinux alive. This ensures we have no timed articles and no paywalls. Just good, fresh content! Alternatively, you can donate through Paypal, Flattr and Liberapay!

Valve seem to be pretty serious about increasing the security of their services, as it turns out they've been paying hackers for finding flaws. 

Using the HackerOne bounty board, Valve has been handing out payments since October last year, but it seems their page only became public earlier this month. If you're interested in helping their security and earning a little while doing so, might be a good place to start.

On top of that, it seems their official Valve Corporation website got a bit of a refresh I noticed recently, but it has since been taken down. I noticed it earlier in the week and posted about it in our Discord Channel, but forgot to post about it here. You can see it using the Wayback Machine, where their about page said this little bit of fun info:

We have some new games in the works, too. A couple have been announced, while others remain top secret.

We know they're working on their new card game, Artifact, plus Campo Santo recently joined them making In the Valley of Gods a Valve game. I am curious to know what these secret games are, since we've known for a while Valve is working on games again, although some of them are VR games. The last full game Valve released was Dota 2, which turns five this July. There was also the free VR experiments "The Lab" from 2016, but who's counting that? It will be very interesting to see Valve get back into the single-player gaming experience once again, but I will stop short of claiming they're working on a third iteration of anything…

Seems there's a lot going on over at Valve at the moment, with a website refresh coming, new games announced while others being kept secret, the Steam UI is due to be updated as well and all their effort in helping to get VR on Linux in good shape too. It's going to be interesting to follow of all this, quite exciting indeed.

21 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG and Humble Store. See more information here.
35 comments
Page: «2/4»
  Go to:

kf 14 May 2018 at 6:59 am UTC
lucifertdark
raneonI really hope they will finally release a 64 bit Steam client including Wayland support.
Would there be any real point adding wayland support as it's already been abandoned by Canonical?
I think you are thinking about Mir, and Mir isn't abandoned either. It's being re-purposed as a Wayland layer.
nox 14 May 2018 at 7:51 am UTC
View PC info
  • Supporter
lucifertdark
raneonI really hope they will finally release a 64 bit Steam client including Wayland support.
Would there be any real point adding wayland support as it's already been abandoned by Canonical?
That's absolutely not correct, to what I've read. They tested wayland in their 17.10 release, but they decided (rightfully) that it wasn't ready for a LTS release like 18.04. Deciding that it still needs more time isn't the same thing as abandoning
devnull 14 May 2018 at 7:53 am UTC
This seems really, really weird. Valve have ignored anything regarding the client at least, on github. NVIDIA of all people are more active on Github then Valve, and that is outright sad.

Maybe different groups within Valve or they outsourced it?

Regarding the 32 vs 64 bit thing, I don't think people understand there are a lot of games compiled to use 32bit. You can't just drop support. The runtime within steam itself has come a long way with lib pinning but it's far from perfect.

Fun fact, the 64bit steam client does exist. If you can get it running the login should show a 64bit icon... at least it did.

tldr - the steam client has serious bugs that have existed for _years_. Valve ignores them for reasons I can only imagine are their being completely out of touch.
sbolokanov 14 May 2018 at 8:27 am UTC
devnullThis seems really, really weird. Valve have ignored anything regarding the client at least, on github. NVIDIA of all people are more active on Github then Valve, and that is outright sad.

Maybe different groups within Valve or they outsourced it?

Regarding the 32 vs 64 bit thing, I don't think people understand there are a lot of games compiled to use 32bit. You can't just drop support. The runtime within steam itself has come a long way with lib pinning but it's far from perfect.

Fun fact, the 64bit steam client does exist. If you can get it running the login should show a 64bit icon... at least it did.

tldr - the steam client has serious bugs that have existed for _years_. Valve ignores them for reasons I can only imagine are their being completely out of touch.

Who the f*ck is talking about dropping 32-bit support?
We f*cking demand, that we have finally a x64 client.

If it has a x64 client, then why the f*ck it does not run on a 64bit-only systems…

* The F*cks are intentional.
Eike 14 May 2018 at 8:43 am UTC
I've got no idea what you expect from a 64 bit Steam client. It's not like it would make anything faster or better. "Proper"? "Modern"? So what? There's still many games running on 32 bits, you'll need a 32 bit layer for a long time to go.
sub 14 May 2018 at 8:58 am UTC
EikeI've got no idea what you expect from a 64 bit Steam client. It's not like it would make anything faster or better. "Proper"? "Modern"? So what? There's still many games running on 32 bits, you'll need a 32 bit layer for a long time to go.

This is why selling stuff with buzzwords works so great, I guess.

32-bit processes can spawn 64-bit processes, or in other words - the 32-bit Steam client can launch 64-bit titles - so there is no limitation in that.

Not having native Wayland support is not something I consider an issue.
There are still lots of users on X and those applications run great via XWayland.

If the client feels sluggish or whatever than it's just because it has some design issues.
And certainly *not* because it's 32-bit or native X application.
Eike 14 May 2018 at 9:18 am UTC
I'd like the client to have "proper" category support. I'm not sure how it should work, but for sure not the way it works now. I categorize games into played though/given up upon/not yet played/try again later, by genres, by "size" (to show off some AAA Linux games from time to time), by playability with a friend on the couch. So in the games list, the about 8 games installed show up at least 20 times... :-/
lucifertdark 14 May 2018 at 9:34 am UTC
kfI think you are thinking about Mir, and Mir isn't abandoned either. It's being re-purposed as a Wayland layer.

noxThat's absolutely not correct, to what I've read. They tested wayland in their 17.10 release, but they decided (rightfully) that it wasn't ready for a LTS release like 18.04. Deciding that it still needs more time isn't the same thing as abandoning

Thanks both of you for setting me straight, not sure where I got the idea Wayland or even Mir were being thrown out, blame it on the moonlight. ;)
sbolokanov 14 May 2018 at 9:41 am UTC
sub
EikeI've got no idea what you expect from a 64 bit Steam client. It's not like it would make anything faster or better. "Proper"? "Modern"? So what? There's still many games running on 32 bits, you'll need a 32 bit layer for a long time to go.

This is why selling stuff with buzzwords works so great, I guess.

32-bit processes can spawn 64-bit processes, or in other words - the 32-bit Steam client can launch 64-bit titles - so there is no limitation in that.

Not having native Wayland support is not something I consider an issue.
There are still lots of users on X and those applications run great via XWayland.

If the client feels sluggish or whatever than it's just because it has some design issues.
And certainly *not* because it's 32-bit or native X application.

For your information there are systems that do not have 32bit layer at all (and they don't need one, to begin with).
I for one, use one of thouse.

Don't really see why are you people even showing up here and arguing that we do not need this.
How the f*ck is that affecting you at all??? I will repeat for the last time: we do not want Valve to drop 32bit, what we want from Valve is to properly support 64bit!
As in: give us 64bit client, so we can play our 64bit games, on a 64bit-only OS.


Last edited by sbolokanov at 14 May 2018 at 7:55 pm UTC
Eike 14 May 2018 at 10:00 am UTC
sbolokanovDon't really see why are you people even showing up here and arguing that we do not need this.

Yeah. So sorry for stating our opinions.

sbolokanovHow the f*ck is that affecting you at all???


Human ressources are limited.
There's problems with the Steam client affecting us all.
I'd prefer Valve working on those.
I'm fine with you wanting something else,
but I still fail to see what's the problem with installing a 32 bit layer.
Is it not available for your system?
Is your hard disc full?

sbolokanovI will repeat for the last time

...


Last edited by Eike at 14 May 2018 at 10:17 am UTC
  Go to:
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on Patreon, Liberapay or Paypal. We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!

Due to spam you need to Register and Login to comment.


Or login with...

Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams
  • RPGoodness: „Shadowrun: Dragonfall“
  • Date:
See more!
Popular this week
View by Category
Contact
Latest Forum Posts