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Valve seem to be pretty serious about increasing the security of their services, as it turns out they've been paying hackers for finding flaws. 

Using the HackerOne bounty board, Valve has been handing out payments since October last year, but it seems their page only became public earlier this month. If you're interested in helping their security and earning a little while doing so, might be a good place to start.

On top of that, it seems their official Valve Corporation website got a bit of a refresh I noticed recently, but it has since been taken down. I noticed it earlier in the week and posted about it in our Discord Channel, but forgot to post about it here. You can see it using the Wayback Machine, where their about page said this little bit of fun info:

We have some new games in the works, too. A couple have been announced, while others remain top secret.

We know they're working on their new card game, Artifact, plus Campo Santo recently joined them making In the Valley of Gods a Valve game. I am curious to know what these secret games are, since we've known for a while Valve is working on games again, although some of them are VR games. The last full game Valve released was Dota 2, which turns five this July. There was also the free VR experiments "The Lab" from 2016, but who's counting that? It will be very interesting to see Valve get back into the single-player gaming experience once again, but I will stop short of claiming they're working on a third iteration of anything…

Seems there's a lot going on over at Valve at the moment, with a website refresh coming, new games announced while others being kept secret, the Steam UI is due to be updated as well and all their effort in helping to get VR on Linux in good shape too. It's going to be interesting to follow of all this, quite exciting indeed.

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Doc Angelo 14 May 2018 at 7:32 pm UTC
[quote=sub]
Doc AngeloAre you sure?

That rather looks like the in-game UI framework delivered with the Source SDK and nothing like the Steam client.

I'm not 100% sure, but it very much sounds like it. They say "Source and Steam applications" are using it. That's worded a little bit wonky, but sounds to me like Steam is using it. It also looks visually quite a bit like it.
vlademir1 15 May 2018 at 6:51 am UTC
liamdaweIt seems people still get hackers and computer crackers mixed up.

I gave up that fight in the mid-00s. I instead switched to a somewhat more pedantic pointing out that while, yes, system breaking would be a specialty under 'hacker' in a proper taxonomy it's neither ubiquitous of hackers nor even all that common and there is a much wider and more utilized array of skills and activities one is ignoring when applying that term merely to those who system break. Part of my reason for doing so was someone pointing out that the "cracker vs hacker" argument comes across to everyone not part of the subculture as either a "no true X" or else as a "not every X" argument, both of which are problematic when trying to sway usage of the term. Another part was simply the weight of history, where it's impossible to not acknowledge while being intellectually honest that system breaking, FOSS, hardware hacking, phreaking, et al originated or else found a safe place to grow in a reasonably unified, culturally speaking, community surrounding the TMRC, MIT AIL, Homebrew Computer Club, et al during the '60s through '80s and only began to break away from each other once the internet became generally publicly available and used in the mid to late '90s.
MagicMyth 15 May 2018 at 8:33 am UTC
Funny how some people are saying why do we need Wayland on a topic about hackers working on security. X11 is a security nightmare. Every time your game connects to a server your computer can easily be pwned if that server is malicous, and face it, anyone who does MP connects to random game servers all the time. X11 pretty much allows anything to do anything. Wayland + snap/flatpack is required to solve this nightmare (and potentially the app can still be X11).

Yes Wayland is not quite there but it very nearly is and now is the time for Valve to start testing the water. The sooner they do the better Wayland will be for all of us. They certainly should be getting involved with the specs on streaming so that it does what they need for Steam's stream system (I like my Steam Link).

As for why people want a 64bit client, it does seem a little backwards to have a 32bit client launching 64bit apps in a 64bit world. It should be the other way round. With a few specialized exceptions all distros are beginning to drop 32bit builds. I would love to be able to purge the need for all but the most essential 32bit packages (e.g. Mesa) but I think that should be way down on priorities right now.

Great to see Valve working with quality hackers to keep their ship tight. And really hope we are getting a new quality single player game from them.


Last edited by MagicMyth at 15 May 2018 at 8:33 am UTC
tuubi 15 May 2018 at 9:04 am UTC
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vlademir1
liamdaweIt seems people still get hackers and computer crackers mixed up.

I gave up that fight in the mid-00s.

I still maintain that "hacker" is simply what programmers/developers/coders now call themselves to sound cool. I can't help but feel embarrassed whenever someone uses the term to describe me. I might have come up with a dirty hack or two over the years, but that does not make me a hacker.

"Hacker" was a common term for people breaking into systems back in the eighties and nineties, whereas "cracker" referred to people specifically breaking software protections. (DRM in modern terms.) But I guess language evolves.
Dunc 17 May 2018 at 11:07 pm UTC
tuubiI still maintain that "hacker" is simply what programmers/developers/coders now call themselves to sound cool. I can't help but feel embarrassed whenever someone uses the term to describe me. I might have come up with a dirty hack or two over the years, but that does not make me a hacker.

"Hacker" was a common term for people breaking into systems back in the eighties and nineties, whereas "cracker" referred to people specifically breaking software protections. (DRM in modern terms.) But I guess language evolves.
The first time I ever heard “hacker”, it was in the non-cracker sense, back in the early '80s. I think it might have been in the late, great, Personal Computer News. What I do remember is that whatever magazine it was used it pretty freely to refer to its readers and staff. It was just the word that was used. Trainspotters spot trains, hackers mess around with computers. “Hackers will prefer machine 'X' over machine 'Y' because it has a built-in debugger and monitor, while 'Y' only has a rudimentary BASIC in ROM,” that kind of thing. I don't recall anyone using it in a pejorative, borderline criminal, sense at all until maybe '87-'88.

I agree that “cracker” tended to refer specifically to people breaking what passed for DRM back then, but that might just be something to do with the circles we frequented.
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