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The Witcher 3 in Wine
catbox_fugue commented on 25 February 2020 at 5:28 pm UTC

nvidia hairworks is the worst thing ever.

upgrading my GPU lately has had me very interested in continuing my Witcher3 goty playthrough.

Shmerl commented on 25 February 2020 at 5:28 pm UTC

I always disable hairworks.

DaiKaiser93 commented on 27 February 2020 at 11:16 pm UTC

ShmerlI'm playing TW3 (GOG version) using Wine with esync patches + dxvk. I don't really use Lutris in general. It works very well. I haven't noticed memory leaks really.

I just disassembled my GPU, apparently I forgot to add one of the Thermal pads the last time I changed the thermal paste (about a year ago), got some thermal pad's arriving tomorrow so I will update if that was the reason.

EDIT: Just finished playing through The Battle of Kaer Morhen and for all the effects used I was expecting a couple crashes, but it runned without a problem.

Ended up adding two layers of Artic Thermal pad on each chip.

Last edited by DaiKaiser93 on 2 March 2020 at 5:27 am UTC

Mohandevir commented on 4 March 2020 at 2:23 pm UTC

Here is the context... I'm on Ubuntu 19.10 with Nvidia driver 440.59 (GTX 1660 Super). I've been trying to play Witcher 3 on Gnome/KDE/Cinnamon desktop and had a lot of tearing/stuttering issues. I tried the usual "Force Full Composition Pipeline" and it kind of worked (there is still some micro stuttering), but If I try to activate the in-game Vsync, I'm back to square one. Thing is, there is no fps cap and my GPU fans tends to skyrocket, without Vsync.

So... This week, I discovered a workaround... Just creating the xorg.conf file (via the nvidia control panel), without the "Force Full Composition Pipeline" option seems to solve my issue... After that, in-game Vsync works great, comparable to when I run my games in the SteamOS-compositor.

Does it makes sense? Is this a placebo effect?

Last edited by Mohandevir on 4 March 2020 at 2:35 pm UTC

Shmerl commented on 5 March 2020 at 4:30 am UTC

From what I've read, "force full compositing pipeline" was always an ugly and poorly performing hack that Nvidia came up with, to compensate for the lack of proper vsync support, which in turn is caused by the fact that they refuse to upstream their driver and therefore can't integrate it with proper DRM/KMS interfaces that handle vsync.

So I'm not surprised that it's giving bad experience.

Last edited by Shmerl on 5 March 2020 at 4:32 am UTC

slaapliedje commented on 5 March 2020 at 4:41 am UTC

MohandevirHere is the context... I'm on Ubuntu 19.10 with Nvidia driver 440.59 (GTX 1660 Super). I've been trying to play Witcher 3 on Gnome/KDE/Cinnamon desktop and had a lot of tearing/stuttering issues. I tried the usual "Force Full Composition Pipeline" and it kind of worked (there is still some micro stuttering), but If I try to activate the in-game Vsync, I'm back to square one. Thing is, there is no fps cap and my GPU fans tends to skyrocket, without Vsync.

So... This week, I discovered a workaround... Just creating the xorg.conf file (via the nvidia control panel), without the "Force Full Composition Pipeline" option seems to solve my issue... After that, in-game Vsync works great, comparable to when I run my games in the SteamOS-compositor.

Does it makes sense? Is this a placebo effect?
Do you have G-Sync, or compatible monitor(s)?

Mohandevir commented on 6 March 2020 at 12:46 am UTC

slaapliedje
MohandevirHere is the context... I'm on Ubuntu 19.10 with Nvidia driver 440.59 (GTX 1660 Super). I've been trying to play Witcher 3 on Gnome/KDE/Cinnamon desktop and had a lot of tearing/stuttering issues. I tried the usual "Force Full Composition Pipeline" and it kind of worked (there is still some micro stuttering), but If I try to activate the in-game Vsync, I'm back to square one. Thing is, there is no fps cap and my GPU fans tends to skyrocket, without Vsync.

So... This week, I discovered a workaround... Just creating the xorg.conf file (via the nvidia control panel), without the "Force Full Composition Pipeline" option seems to solve my issue... After that, in-game Vsync works great, comparable to when I run my games in the SteamOS-compositor.

Does it makes sense? Is this a placebo effect?
Do you have G-Sync, or compatible monitor(s)?

Nope! It's connected to my 4 years old Panasonic HD TV.

Pangaea commented on 14 March 2020 at 7:12 am UTC
Shmerl commented on 16 March 2020 at 4:29 am UTC

Just some nice screenshots - on the mountain path to Fornhala

image

image

image

Last edited by Shmerl on 16 March 2020 at 1:32 pm UTC

Pangaea commented on 16 March 2020 at 11:10 am UTC

I like that road. It's very unique, with harsh weather and it seems so desolate.

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