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Question about linux game engine compatibility.
Poll results: Best Game Engine Linux Windows Mac
Unity
 
9 vote(s)
75%
Other ¿?
 
3 vote(s)
25%
Unreal Engine
 
0 vote(s)
0%
Cry Engine
 
0 vote(s)
0%
novaprospekt216 commented on 5 July 2017 at 7:06 am UTC

Hello!!

We are a group of 3 friends wanting to make a game to learn and for fun. 2 of us are windows-only users, but i love Linux. So i proposed making the game as multiplatform-friendly as we can and also expressed PC-First and not Consoles-First. The question i can't solve is what Engine to use? I really would like to use/add vulkan support but:

-> I see Unreal Engine only has vulkan for the mobile render.
-> CryEngine still does not have vulkan api support.
-> Unity: Seems the right choice right now. Full vulkan support.

What would you recommend?

Thank you!

Also 2/3 use AMD so we will try to make things work out of the box!! Wish us luck! hehe...

stan commented on 5 July 2017 at 11:03 am UTC

I don’t have any experience with these so here are my 2 cents… As far as I know the one with the best support for Linux is Unity3D. You can also check Godot which is a free and open-source alternative (possibly not as powerful and documented as Unity3D yet). Blender also has a game engine.

Julius commented on 16 July 2017 at 10:24 pm UTC

Don't make Vulkan a requirement right now, it will come sooner or later to most engines and will likely not require huge games changes.

Best is to use some engine that doesn't require complex compiling steps etc, as this is really a pain in the a** under Windows. I second the recommendation for Godot, as it is easy to get running and hand having something nice before you loose motivation. Torque3D.org might also be worth a look if you want to make a 3D game with terrain.
If you like coding in Python, Panda3D might also be a good choice. Urho3D might also fit the bill.

lucinos commented on 17 July 2017 at 8:42 am UTC

As far as I understand I would say for most convenience probably unity. For most degrees of freedom, help an open source engine (like godot).

Duck Hunt-Pr0 commented on 22 July 2017 at 7:35 pm UTC

novaprospekt216to learn

I'd say this should rule out engines (Unity, Unreal or Cryengine).. Depending of course on what you guys want to learn during the process..

I am of the the personal opinion that Unity3D is perhaps the worst thing to have ever happen to gaming, apart from DRM systems..(from a consumer point of view). In my opinions Unity is kind of like the Adobe Flash of game development.

It's games are most often bloated in both system requirements and size , slow; And allow developer to churn out games over a weekend (out of which 80%+ are complete sh*t, yet often attempted to be sold for money. Maybe in hope to cover cost of purchased assets?). I claim Unity3D fosters incompetence, laziness and lack of understanding of what makes a good game..

Choose rather frameworks, wether it be SDL, SFML or GLFW or similar..You will learn more, and also probably care more about the end result.

AND, with the right kind of savvy, tool chain and (cross-platform) build system (CMake being one), you guys could easily port your game to basically any platform whatsoever you desire (retro- and future..) (usually without having to pay extra/anything for ability to "export" your game to certain platforms)

By the way..If you're a team developing something , you'll likely want a version control system (Git and/or Mercurial are the ones i'd go for)
etc) to more easily collaborate .. There's these solutions , but i also think some online service offer privately hosted ones, for smaller teams (~5 members) for 100% free (bitbucket might be one?).

And if you need assets that you cannot produce yourself; There are freelance services like Elance, ODesk/Upwork, or f*cking Fiverr.com where you can turn to, to get made completely custom assets, from icons to source code, for cheap by very talented freelancers. (Rather than using ¤#"¤" asset store, selling sh*t hundreds of games are already using)

...And I'm then more likely to see a game that pleases me whenever i should play your game..-

mirv commented on 22 July 2017 at 9:06 pm UTC

novaprospekt216Hello!!

We are a group of 3 friends wanting to make a game to learn and for fun. 2 of us are windows-only users, but i love Linux. So i proposed making the game as multiplatform-friendly as we can and also expressed PC-First and not Consoles-First. The question i can't solve is what Engine to use? I really would like to use/add vulkan support but:

-> I see Unreal Engine only has vulkan for the mobile render.
-> CryEngine still does not have vulkan api support.
-> Unity: Seems the right choice right now. Full vulkan support.

What would you recommend?

Thank you!

Also 2/3 use AMD so we will try to make things work out of the box!! Wish us luck! hehe...

Depends what aspect of game development you want to learn. There's quite a few aspects behind it - do you really want to learn about making a game, or the underlying code, or something else?
Being concerned about Vulkan might be a moot point if you don't actually want to learn Vulkan itself - and if you do, then I'd say start somewhere else: Vulkan has quite the learning curve!

I'd probably go with Unity for learning about making a _game_. CryEngine I don't have much to say on. Unreal Engine lets you play with the source code - but that's only useful if you care about the underlying source code (and it's definitely not something that will be quick if you want to start figuring out how that all works, so it might be better going with something a little simpler).

No matter what you go with, don't expect that you're locking yourself into something. Can switch to something else later once you're more familiar with everything. Spend time trying out everything you can: most game engines will come with a basic tutorial on how to get started with them.

So yeah, let us know a bit more about what your expectations are, and I'm sure we can all give a bit better feedback.

tuubi commented on 22 July 2017 at 10:08 pm UTC

Duck Hunt-Pr0I claim Unity3D fosters incompetence, laziness and lack of understanding of what makes a good game..
Psst, your elitism is showing.

Duck Hunt-Pr0 commented on 22 July 2017 at 10:25 pm UTC

tuubi
Duck Hunt-Pr0I claim Unity3D fosters incompetence, laziness and lack of understanding of what makes a good game..
Psst, your elitism is showing.

Ahoy there matey! Elitism about what!? Did your browser perchance glitch away the fact that i speak from a consumer perspective? Please, talk louder as i'm hard of hearing!!

But in advance; Please quit being a lazy, incompetent Unity game "developer" that commonly expect players to part with their money for games that are ~60% of the time far shittier games than even mediocre, free abandon-ware

tuubi commented on 22 July 2017 at 10:47 pm UTC

Duck Hunt-Pr0
tuubi
Duck Hunt-Pr0I claim Unity3D fosters incompetence, laziness and lack of understanding of what makes a good game..
Psst, your elitism is showing.

Ahoy there matey! Elitism about what!?
You know. Your basic "if you're not doing it the hard way, it's not worth doing at all." Saying you shouldn't use Unity/gamemaker/whatever because it's possible to easily make bad games with them just doesn't make sense. The gems are few and far between but that's true for any form of entertainment.

Duck Hunt-Pr0 commented on 22 July 2017 at 10:56 pm UTC

tuubi
Duck Hunt-Pr0
tuubi
Duck Hunt-Pr0I claim Unity3D fosters incompetence, laziness and lack of understanding of what makes a good game..
Psst, your elitism is showing.

Ahoy there matey! Elitism about what!?
You know. Your basic "if you're not doing it the hard way, it's not worth doing at all."

Not sure where you conjured that quote from..Not to mention anything regarding Gamemaker, RPG maker, App Game Kit or Click Team Fusion.. But anyway, Unity is still the common cause of terrible bloatware games released today.

And the subject was "wanting to make a game to learn" ..If however that means simply Unity or Unreal script..who's to say it's wrong..

tuubi commented on 22 July 2017 at 11:06 pm UTC

Duck Hunt-Pr0But anyway, Unity is still the common cause of bloatware games released today.
I don't think it is. It's simply a popular engine, it's affordable and it's relatively easy to use. That's why people use it to make games, good and bad. I do understand your point by the way, I just don't agree with your conclusions.

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