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Reminded again that Linux is lacking
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YoRHa-2B 6 Aug

Quoting: LinasNow let's say you want to make Mesa render at a lower level-of-detail based on the GPU temperature. A naive implementation could be reading the temperature of the GPU in the Mesa library, and adjusting LOD based on that.
There's a much simpler explanation for why Radeon Boost in particular isn't something we'll ever see.

It just does not work.

It's limited to a whopping total of 8 games. Eight. Why? Because with the way modern computer graphics work these days, you can't just hook the API and lower render target resolution or viewport size, you'd break all sorts of post-processing effects and lighting passes and whatnot in the process. So basically, AMD have to explicitly implement per-game hacks that set the appropriate knobs (viewport size, shader parameters, compute shader workgroup counts etc.) for every single game they want to support.

Not to mention that the overall approach is just garbage. I tested it with SotTR back in the day when the driver that heavily advertized the feature came out and really just leads to janky camera controls, since rapidly changing frame times isn't something that games are particularly fond of. Guess why you pretty much never hear anybody talk about this anymore? Yeah, nobody fucking uses it.

You know what does work reasonably well in practice? Games adjusting rendering resolution dynamically by themselves to hit a desired frame rate. It's getting increasingly common and should be a viable way for the 4k crowd in particular to enjoy their games at reasonable quality and performance levels without having to buy a 2080 Ti. And all of that without AMD making an even bigger mess out of their Windows driver package than it already is.

Last edited by YoRHa-2B on 6 August 2020 at 2:57 pm UTC

Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: LinuxwarperI highly doubt you will see Nvidia support Linux with DLSS as well as on Windows if at all.

I don't think there's any reason why they wouldn't, actually.

Should Bethesda, say, since they like themselves a bit of Vulkan, suddenly decide that they want to release their games on Linux, and they want to use DLSS, I think Nvidia would be happy to make that happen.

They're allergic to the GPL, which is why they haven't done it for their own game, Feral have got no reason to only target half of a very small market by spending time translating features that would only work on Nvidia cards, and the Wine/DXVK/VKD3D folks have the additional barrier that it's putting support for proprietary stuff in their open source project, but, if one of Nvidia's existing partners wanted it they'd do it, and it probably wouldn't be that much work.

As long as they get to keep their toys in a black box and behind an NDA they want people to use them. It would be a library along with the driver that provides those functions. Someone just needs to give them a reason to compile it.
But you won't see Nvidia take the iniative to make DLSS work through Proton or natively. That's my point. They may do it when Linux market grows but then so will all other actors too when they see it's beneifical. They won't do it for time being or probably not in a year or two.
Quoting: YoRHa-2BNot to mention that the overall approach is just garbage. I tested it with SotTR back in the day when the driver that heavily advertized the feature came out and really just leads to janky camera controls, since rapidly changing frame times isn't something that games are particularly fond of. Guess why you pretty much never hear anybody talk about this anymore? Yeah, nobody fucking uses it.

You know what does work reasonably well in practice? Games adjusting rendering resolution dynamically by themselves to hit a desired frame rate. It's getting increasingly common and should be a viable way for the 4k crowd in particular to enjoy their games at reasonable quality and performance levels without having to buy a 2080 Ti. And all of that without AMD making an even bigger mess out of their Windows driver package than it already is.
I don't have reasons to doubt you but if it's as you say, then AMD is pretty stupid for persuing such a feature. It seemed like a good idea but when I realize the fps would go up alot I no longer thought it as useful. Even if you could adjust to fps going up, it would surely be somewhat annoying.

Hopefully we will see more games with dynamic resolution.

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