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I stopped buying games in 2021.....
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Plintslîcho 1 Dec, 2021
Interesting! And no, you're definitely not alone. In fact after reading your comment I realised I myself have bought only two games this year and like with all games I start playing these days, I've lost interest after only a few hours and stopped playing them again.

Like others here, I've such a huge backlog of games that I as well will probably never be able to play them all. So I don't see the point of adding even more to the catalogue.

At the same time, I greatly lost interest in playing games or get bored rather quickly. Instead, I rather spend my time differently.

So playing some old games from time to time suits me quite fine and I really don't feel like I'm missing out anything.
Anza 1 Dec, 2021
Interesting, I have been doing bit of a opposite. I have been trying buy at least few games during the year they were released. I'm just curious what's out there. Especially about games that are on track to being somewhat popular.

As I'm mostly buying Linux natives, new games are not going to break the bank either. As I'm buying relatively few games, there's bit more time for each game.

I think I share some favorites with scaine.

Valheim has most hours and it's one of those rare first open survival craft games that have native Linux build. It can be bit unfair sometimes, but not as unfair as Muck.

Ziggurat II is proving FPS fix for this year. Sure, it's roguelite arena shooter, so story is bit thin, but it's still good fun.

Rain on your Parade is quite good mayhem.

Luck be a Landlord is a roguelite slot machine game. Doesn't have as expansive world as Valheim for sure as all you see is the slot machine, but it's still fun little game.

Griftlands is narrative card game. Relationship building is in heart the game, which is something little bit different.

Loop Hero is maybe last one worth mentioning. I guess it's bit like autobattler with constructing world from tiles. It's clearly doing its own thing.

Last edited by Anza on 2 December 2021 at 5:41 pm UTC
g000h 2 Dec, 2021
In the last couple of years my game-buying has declined. Sharing some reasons for that:

- I already own a ridiculously large collection of games. Many of which I have never installed. Occasionally I spot a special offer, and think "Hmm, I should buy that, that's a good deal" only to then despair at the fact that I already own it and I didn't remember. (Nowadays, I always search my game collection before finalising a purchase.)

- I have slowly become more realistic with respect to understanding what I'll get out of games titles. I choose games based on research whether the game-loop appeals to me. Some games play incredibly well, and I just can't put them down. (These games fit that mould for me: 7 Days To Die, Nuclear Throne, Slay The Spire, FTL, Ring of Pain, Crypt of the Necrodancer)

- There have been less AAA native Linux titles released, recently. We've got more games thanks to Proton, but I'm not inspired to buy them unless they are available for *my* platform (Linux). My quite recent 2021 purchases of Valheim, Prodeus (due to come to Linux after EA), Ion Fury, Objects in Space, Vaporum - were thanks to those games supporting Linux. Linux played a major part in my decision to go ahead with the purchase at the specific price-point.

- I've also come to the understanding that game longevity is limited. If the game is old and isn't updated, it can get to the point where it cannot be played any more. Progress keeps marching on in the tech world, new Linux kernels, new libraries. Plenty of older games get left in the past, and become harder to launch as time goes on. I can't guarantee that Steam, itch, GOG, Epic Store, Stadia (hah!) or others will be around in 10 years time. So, when one of those ceases to exist, what about *my* games - Oh, yeah - They're gone for good (unless I downloaded them and retain an old system to play them on).
denyasis 3 Dec, 2021
So I was reading some of the replies on my lunch break and was giving it some thought.

I think I'm gonna skip purchasing for 2022.

My first thought was "Ohh, what about that awesome release coming up in 2022?" Followed by "Wait, what game was I thinking of?"

Almost like the assumption is that something big/good HAS to come out...

If I can't remember what in 2022 I'm supposed to be excited for, I probably won't remember to play it.

Besides waiting for '23 will give me plenty of time to remember what I'm supposed to be excited for... And maybe a big fixing patch or two, lol.
Arcadius-8606 4 Dec, 2021
Quoting: g000hI've also come to the understanding that game longevity is limited. If the game is old and isn't updated, it can get to the point where it cannot be played any more. Progress keeps marching on in the tech world, new Linux kernels, new libraries. Plenty of older games get left in the past, and become harder to launch as time goes on. I can't guarantee that Steam, itch, GOG, Epic Store, Stadia (hah!) or others will be around in 10 years time. So, when one of those ceases to exist, what about *my* games - Oh, yeah - They're gone for good (unless I downloaded them and retain an old system to play them on).

This may not really hold any water. I have games from the 80's for computers systems no longer in production and yet there are emulators and other methods to get them up and running. You're right though about backing them up which I believe should be common practice for those into DRM FREE gaming.
GustyGhost 11 Jan
I discovered that the assets in Red Eclipse 2 are really professional and it looks like they might have hired talent to produce maps. The gameplay is still very arena-y but very solid. I may need to put that project on this year's donation list.
Pangaea 17 Jan
Have barely bought any games in 2021 either. Not because I set out to do that, but there simply wasn't much that interested me. The one big exception was the new Pathfinder game, because I loved the first one. But sadly they don't support Linux this time around, and apparently never will. So then I can't support them either. A shame.

Did back a Kickstarter campaign (with Linux promise), a game called Crowsworn. Other than that, I only bought two games last year: Hollow Knight and Terraria.
Arehandoro 17 Jan
Interesting thoughts and ideas. In 2021 I almost stopped buying Nintendo Switch games altogether, as most releases were also in PC or didn't interest me at all (this changed in December, though), but I did get more games on PC. Specially at the beginning of 2021 and again at the end.

It has also been a task of mine to play more games from my already long library, and 2021 probably was one of the best years on that recently. However, contrary to OP, I've tried to stop buying games when on sale, but most importantly, I've reduced greatly the amount of games I have in my wish lists.

My reason to do this is that in the long term I ended up spending more money, by just buying many cheap games, that in the end would clatter my library, or would cause me anxiety from seeing them in the library and not playing, or knowing my list is getting longer, etc. Therefore, I decided to be more selective with the games purchased/played, and that sparked a new interest for gaming more, as well as playing when the title was released. The latter being helpful to enjoy the communities more, or in case of online games (which I don't usually play) to have a bigger fan base.

All in all, I pay more for a single game, but mentally, and economically, works better for me.
Pangaea 17 Jan
Quoting: ArehandoroHowever, contrary to OP, I've tried to stop buying games when on sale, but most importantly, I've reduced greatly the amount of games I have in my wish lists.
I haven't done anything with the wistlist, it doesn't all that many anyway, but I ended up doing the same. Not buying "maybe it's interesting" on sale, but instead buying the few games I bought when I wanted to try them out. Both happened to be at full price when I did. But I played both quite a lot, so they didn't just sit in the library without even getting installed.

Admittedly I don't have a silly large library like probably some do (I've heard about thousands of games), but I still have more than I'll be able to play through. Therefore I've made the choice to only buy games that I truly want to play - now. And with so few Linux games available on GOG (shteam can FOAD), it's pretty easy to be restrictive. The main interest these days comes from indies and kickstarters tbh.
What a little great post. Lots of things in it..
Funny that I agree with a lot of what you wrote, despite myself doing almost the opposite, meaning I got lots of games in 2021.

Quoting: denyasisI must admit I've had some conflicting thoughts and opinions while doing it and I'd love to hear how I'm not a true Linux gamer or something😋
Yeah... while we're at it, I'd love to hear what the heck is a "true" Linux gamer anyway.

Quoting: denyasis- 2021 might have been a "bad" year for games. I don't think, without looking here, I could tell you one upcoming release, let alone one that's really exciting to me. I think part of that is our niche slot in gaming as linuxers, part is the early access model. There were a lot of interesting and cool games released... But must haves???
I think the root of the problem is that some of us (-ehem- "us grandpas" -ehem-) have a very different idea of what we call a "finished" game. Most "good" "AAA" games released in 2021 will become actually good games by the same month in 2022.

People are paying full price for an underwhelming experience, meanwhile you come year(s) later, paying half the price for the finished product.

Quoting: denyasis- I'm hurting or not supporting the devs!
They're all gonna be just fine. How about great community projects that do it mostly for free, like Beyond All Reason, 0 A.D., OpenRA and company...

Quoting: denyasis-I'm not a real gamer! Probably. I know of people who get super excited for the latest and greatest. The buzz. The hype. The rig upgrades!
At this point I don't think anybody in the industry can explain what a "real gamer" is. Probably nobody can tell what a "gamer" is.

Yeah, I don't think we are missing anything. It reminds me a lot of the music market: my best music recommendations I've gotten from a buddy, never from what's hot in the night clubs or in the radio.
In the same way, I've gotten a few good game recommendations by reading some of the comments on this site (thank you, people) and none whatsoever from "the industry". To this day, I think Steam still hasn't figured me out despite my obvious playtime history in my library. Still keeps recommending me garbage.
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