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After Canonical announced they would be ending 32bit support earlier this year and then adjusting their plans after the backlash, they've now posted what packages they will look to continue supporting.

Canonical's Steve Langasek posted on their Discourse forum a list which they "have been able to determine there is user demand based on the feedback up to this point" and they will "carry forward to 20.04" and that includes other packages not directly in the list that they may depend on.

Additionally, their methodology for picking the packages included ensuring some well-known apps continue working like Unity, Godot, printer drivers and more. The list includes some noteworthy items like SDL 2, Wine, DXVK, Steam, some Mesa packages, a few open source games and so on.

See the full post here, where Langasek did mention to give feedback if you feel essential 32bit packages are missing from their list. It's good to see some clarity surrounding it, hopefully this won't cause any issues now.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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41 comments
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ZoeyGlobe 17 September 2019 at 3:17 pm UTC
I wish they would ask for feedback in a more noticeable place, as that's what got them into the backlash to begin with as nobody knew of their little forum, but at least they understand that they shouldn't just make such a change without asking the community at large, now. I wish them luck in their transition to less beginning-to-be-obsolete 32-bit legacy packages, and eventually to 64-bit only if compatibility can be ensured via other methods than their suggested snappy package "fix".
Dedale 17 September 2019 at 3:35 pm UTC
At least this is public and stated well in advance. Maybe this needs a little bit more publicity ? I hope this time nobody will be taken by surprise. That said, Manjaro looks very good.
einherjar 17 September 2019 at 3:57 pm UTC
It is a bit "meeh". I can't really tell them, wich 32 Bit libs I need - I don't know how to find out....

So I asked for my printer driver and the spotify client.
Kimyrielle 17 September 2019 at 3:58 pm UTC
In all honesty, 32 bit stuff DOES need to go at some point. I mean, for how long is Linux supposed to carry on that old baggage?

That Steam (which is one of the most important Linux applications there is, and is maintained by a multi-billion dollar business) STILL doesn't have a 64 bit client is quite frankly unforgivable.

I would really think they should agree on a reasonable grace period and then elbow people into finally updating their legacy 32 bit apps. If after that date, people still -really- insist on running decades-old software or even older hardware, they can still maintain and build these packages themselves. It's open source software, after all.
Dedale 17 September 2019 at 4:01 pm UTC
Not this <beep> again !
einherjar 17 September 2019 at 4:10 pm UTC
KimyrielleIn all honesty, 32 bit stuff DOES need to go at some point. I mean, for how long is Linux supposed to carry on that old baggage?

That Steam (which is one of the most important Linux applications there is, and is maintained by a multi-billion dollar business) STILL doesn't have a 64 bit client is quite frankly unforgivable.

Honestly, how many multi-billion dollar companies offer a great gaming client like steam?
I forgive it easily and with our about 1% marketshare, we should be a little bit cautious with "elbowing out" - it may result in a "we don`t support Linux anymore - sorry".

And playing "old" 32 Bit games is also not that unforgivable, isn't it?


Last edited by einherjar at 17 September 2019 at 4:10 pm UTC
TimeFreeze 17 September 2019 at 4:14 pm UTC
KimyrielleIn all honesty, 32 bit stuff DOES need to go at some point. I mean, for how long is Linux supposed to carry on that old baggage?

That Steam (which is one of the most important Linux applications there is, and is maintained by a multi-billion dollar business) STILL doesn't have a 64 bit client is quite frankly unforgivable.

I would really think they should agree on a reasonable grace period and then elbow people into finally updating their legacy 32 bit apps. If after that date, people still -really- insist on running decades-old software or even older hardware, they can still maintain and build these packages themselves. It's open source software, after all.

I disagree. 32bit needs to stay, yet alone for all those 32bit applications/games. How am i supposed to play/use those when they are gone?
Redface 17 September 2019 at 4:22 pm UTC
I was waiting for this since they wrote they would create that list and let users request what they need, and was wondering it would be postponed until a later release now with 19.10 so close.

I have a 19.10 installation on my laptop since July and will test games on it in case some need some 32 bit libraries not on the list and not in the steam runtime.
ElectricPrism 17 September 2019 at 4:26 pm UTC
KimyrielleIn all honesty, 32 bit stuff DOES need to go at some point. I mean, for how long is Linux supposed to carry on that old baggage?

Okay. Then. Lets just obsolete 32-bit, 64-bit and switch to source only distros like Gentoo then. Because that's the only way we are going to end the cycle of obsoleting 8-bit, 16-bit, 32-bit, 64-bit, 128-bit 256-bit etc...

TimeFreezeI disagree. 32bit needs to stay, yet alone for all those 32bit applications/games. How am i supposed to play/use those when they are gone?

Agree. We still have DOSBox to play DOS games and all kinds of containers to keep games working. 32-bit needs to stay -- devs literally no longer have the source code to some games and there is no difference to the average consumer, all they see is "It works" and "It doesn't work".

Steam isn't an idealistic engineer's dream of the perfect system with 0 users, it's a practical middle-ground for all developers will millions of users which delivers games & content to gamers.
Shmerl 17 September 2019 at 4:38 pm UTC
KimyrielleIn all honesty, 32 bit stuff DOES need to go at some point. I mean, for how long is Linux supposed to carry on that old baggage?

No, thanks. This isn't about clients, but about a ton of games that will be unplayable without it. Until there is another solution (with adequate performance), it shouldn't go, that's very clear.


Last edited by Shmerl at 17 September 2019 at 4:40 pm UTC
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