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Sad news today Linux gamers, Psyonix emailed us directly to make sure we saw the news that they're officially ending support of Rocket League on Linux and macOS.

Their published statement on this was quite short and didn't really explain much:

As we continue to upgrade Rocket League with new technologies, it is no longer viable for us to maintain support for the macOS and Linux (SteamOS) platforms. As a result, the final patch for the macOS and Linux versions of the game will be in March. This update will disable online functionality (such as in-game purchases) for players on macOS and Linux, but offline features including Local Matches, and splitscreen play will still be accessible.

If you purchased Rocket League for Mac or Linux on Steam, the game will still work with full functionality when installed and played on a computer running Windows 7 or newer.

So the Linux and macOS versions will still be there, but left old and online play will be disabled. Not good. Not good at all and as a huge Rocket League fan I'm not pleased—annoyed you might say.

This "new technologies" bit was interesting, perhaps they've decided to go DirectX 12 with an Unreal Engine upgrade? At this point we can only speculate with so little information. In the expanded support page, for Linux they mentioned playing Rocket League with Steam Play Proton is possible although they will not be supporting it.

When Psyonix became part of Epic Games back in May last year, many speculated that Rocket League would not only drop Linux support but also leave Steam. I didn't think either would happen but here we are, Psyonix has still never said they will continue to sell the game on Steam only that it would see "continued support". Originally, I thought meant it would go free to play, but with this move it seems a little more likely it will move over to the Epic Store which doesn't support Linux.


Update: Psyonix are now suggesting to request a refund from them on their support portal.

Update 2 - 24/01: Psyonix are now telling us "macOS and Linux players can reach out directly to Steam to request refunds and they will be honored. In these cases, Steam will make an exception to their 2 hours limit rule.". Their own support ticket team are now also saying to ask Steam for the refund, although Valve has denied my own refund twice.

In situations like this, Valve ideally need a better support system in place or at least an option of platform removal to get around the usual way. As we end up going in circles.

Update 3: After making their PR team aware what was going on with the refund situation, they've now released a statement on Reddit. Refunds will be accepted on Steam now, plus they gave the reason behind removing Linux and macOS support.

It's what I suspected as written above, they're upgrading to a higher version of Direct X which is a problem as the "macOS and Linux native clients depend on our DX9 implementation for their OpenGL renderer to function" and they're not willing to put resources into Vulkan/Metal for Linux/macOS when the combined player-base was apparently "0.3%" of the active total and when "viable workarounds exist" with Wine being mentioned.


They could have gone for Vulkan though to get Windows + Linux (and Stadia) and possibly even macOS with MoltenVK. It's a shame another company decided to stick with a proprietary API. That said, it may not have been possible if they're on quite an old version of Unreal Engine.

If you do get a refund for it, be sure you use that Steam Wallet funding for a developer that does support Linux. Make it count.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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Kyrottimus 3 February 2020 at 1:03 am UTC
Liam DaweI had my DLC refunded when I replied to my Steam ticket to mention the DLC was now useless.

Consider yourself one of the lucky ones:
(TLDR: They refunded my game only and none of the DLC, and wont...)

KyrottimusMessage from you on Jan 30 @ 5:40pm | 3 days ago
Since Pysonix is completely dropping all support for Rocket League, please refund my purchase of Rocket League, please refund my purchase of all applicable Rocket League DLC as well as all steam-wallet purchases used in Rocket League (i.e. every penny I invested into this game). I'm more than happy to have the refund put back into my Steam Wallet so I can support game developers who not only support Linux, but live up to and stand by their commitments.

If I can no longer play an online competitive game *online* with other people (as designed), a game I've spent quite a bit of money on with DLC/customizations or crate keys, there's no point in keeping a game that is quarantining us Linux players to offline-use-only forever.

https://support.rocketleague.com/hc/en-us/articles/360042201433

They (Psyonix) are telling Linux/MacOS game owners to ask for a refund directly from Steam, regardless of play time and time of purchase and that they will be honored.

Any assistance in this matter would be greatly appreciated.

Have a great rest of your day (or night)!
Very Best Regards,
-Kyro

Steam SupportMessage from Steam Support on Feb 1 @ 4:13am | 1 day and 13 hours ago
Hi Kyro, I understand the game developer discontinued supporting MacOS and Linux operating systems for this game.

Although the MacOS and Linux (SteamOS) versions will no longer be updated or supported, you will still be able to download and install these versions, but some features will not function as expected.

Having said that, I have processed a refund for your purchase of Rocket League to your Steam wallet.

Please note that due to how long ago this purchase was made, it is no longer possible to refund them to the original payment method.

Please let me know if I can help clarify anything else.

Your Buddy in Shining Armour,
Champ

At this point he refunded the cost of the game only, none of the DLC...

KyrottimusMessage from you on Feb 1 @ 7:14am | 1 day and 10 hours ago
Champ, what about all my Rocket League DLC? I was wanting that refunded too. It's silly and a real waste to refund the game only and not all the DLC I paid for.

QuoteAlthough the MacOS and Linux (SteamOS) versions will no longer be updated or supported, you will still be able to download and install these versions, but some features will not function as expected.

Well, "some features" include being able to play the game online...at all...even private matches won't function any longer. It will abjectly be a game vs. local bots, which is pretty stale. The fact that they wont even let us play online with other Linux/MacOs players on quarantined or private servers is lazy, incompetent and stupid.

I was really wanting to refund the game as well as all my purchased Rocket League DLC and all steam-wallet purchases as well, as refunding the game only would not be (is not) worth it, as I had spent a lot more on that than the initial game purchase alone. It makes me wonder if my initial ticket was even read entirely or just skimmed for content. I get it, you probably get thousands of these support tickets a day and have to look for the keywords to respond from. I fully understand.

QuoteHaving said that, I have processed a refund for your purchase of Rocket League to your Steam wallet.

Please note that due to how long ago this purchase was made, it is no longer possible to refund them to the original payment method.

In my initial message, I had communicated that I intended on getting the game, DLC etc. refunded to my steam wallet anyway, so that's not a problem at all.

From my initial support request:
Quoteplease refund my purchase of all applicable Rocket League DLC as well as all steam-wallet purchases used in Rocket League (i.e. every penny I invested into this game). I'm more than happy to have the refund put back into my Steam Wallet so I can support game developers who not only support Linux, but live up to and stand by their commitments.

The problem is you refunded the game only, and not all the DLC or in-game steam wallet purchases I had made on it, and if I had known (based on the URL links I included in my initial message, I was led to believe I would receive refunds on the DLC as well, at least), I wouldn't have requested a refund at all if it was only the game, as I had spent way more on DLC and in-game purchase than the base price.

The two options I would prefer:

A): Please refund me all my additional Rocket League DLC purchases, at least (and in-game purchases if possible).

B): If you cannot/are abjectly 100% sure there can be no refunds at all on my Rocket League DLC purchases, please give me the game back so I can at least play it offline to see all the useless DLC and items I own to remind myself how much money I wasted on Rocket League DLC and in-game items that are now useless as no-one else ever will see them since I wont be able to play online in any facet anymore. That or please bump me up to the next person who can refund all my purchased Rocket League DLC.


Thanks,
-Kyro

Steam SupportMessage from Steam Support on Feb 2 @ 4:02pm | 1 hour and 48 minutes ago
Hello,

Thank you for taking the time to reach back out to our Support Team.

We have closely reviewed your request. Unfortunately, your in game purchases and DLCS does not qualify for a refund.

To ensure future eligibility, please submit refund requests within 14 days and less than 2 hours of playtime.

Please review our Refund Policy and Common Refund Questions for more information.

Regards,
Christel

[EDIT -- Update 16FEB2020: Today I received a refund as well for the DLCs. I just wanted to update this post to reflect that Valve did refund both the base game of Rocket League as well as all the DLCs I owned, even if it took a bit for the DLCs to get refunded as well.]


Last edited by Kyrottimus on 16 February 2020 at 6:49 pm UTC
appetrosyan 3 February 2020 at 4:23 pm UTC
antisol
scainethink about the end-game, which is perfect, seamless support for all Windows games, on Linux.

Firstly, that's not my end-game. I'm not particularly interested in running windows games on Linux. I'd rather have Linux games.

Secondly, the idea of having perfect, seamless support for all Windows games is a pipe dream that will never happen unless Microsoft opens up the relevant tech (directx, win32 api or whatever the modern equivalent is), which they will absolutely never do. Even if they did you're only going to get up tp ~95% compatibility. Without the specs (at least) for these techs being open it's always going to be a reverse-engineering effort where you're playing whack-a-mole with new versions of APIs. If you think that this is a reasonable goal you're just setting yourself up for disappointment.

You're not going to get perfect support for all windows games under wine. Not ever. This is the nature of emulation. 100% is not achievable, even with open specs and non-moving targets. Attempting it with windows is bold and commendable but ultimately futile and laughable. Wine can't even run the ~20 year old stuff that I want to run.

This comment highlights a common misconception that plagues all of these discussions.. For the LAST TIME, WINE = WINE IS NOT an EMULATOR.

Reverse engineering, can and often does work better than having access to the source code, provided enough dedication and good enough platforms: nblood vs blood fresh supply is a good example of a reverse engineered lovingly crafted engine doing better than a commercial port.

Wine can't run things that are 20years old, may be up to the projects themselves, and it's highly likely that windows 10 can't either. At this stage the only thing that does actually make more sense to do is to think of the distant future. Apple just deprecated 90% of all games that have a Mac version, because of stubbornly removing 32-bit libraries. A similar thing can and might very well happen on Windows, and on Linux, we have averted the catastrophe once, we can avert it again. I'm positive that at some point, the libraries will be deprecated so badly that we'll simply be bundling them as part of retro gaming, much like we do now for the 8/16 bit stuff. This, you will never be able to do, if you've never ventured into emulation.

A pipe dream it might be, but I'm happy with the vertical slice of games that can reliably be played through wine. I'm also a bit unhappy with the state of "native" games with proprietary licenses.
appetrosyan 3 February 2020 at 4:27 pm UTC
scaine
antisol
scainethink about the end-game, which is perfect, seamless support for all Windows games, on Linux.

Firstly, that's not my end-game. I'm not particularly interested in running windows games on Linux. I'd rather have Linux games.

That's the point. Once SteamPlay hits its visionary goal, there won't be any distinction.

As for the rest of your post, it's weirdly pessimistic. There are literally thousands of games I can already "play like native" and this is only the first year. In fact, there are quite a few titles that run better on Linux now than Windows 10.

Sure, the goal is visionary. And it isn't just about wine. It's about Valve and others encouraging more open development so that future titles aren't really "Windows" games anymore. It'll take years, perhaps decades, but look at the impact Vulkan has already had in such a short time. Look at DXVK that followed closely. Look at the maturity of things like SDL. It's all coming together nicely, I think.

An important point to mention is that by improving wine, you're able to fix bugs to games that are otherwise frozen in a non-playable state. You can make a specific patch that averts a specific sys call from segfaulting. Doing the same using SDL without access to the source code, would only incur additional overhead. More importantly, instead of the decision of what works and what doesn't being down to the technologies used, you now incorporate elements of corporate politics. Bethesda's games will never feature an SDL client, having no Proton, leaves them to decide, if we get to play Doom Eternal, or TES VI. With proton, they need to actively work against supporting it, to make it incompatible.
slaapliedje 7 February 2020 at 8:03 am UTC
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appetrosyan
antisol
scainethink about the end-game, which is perfect, seamless support for all Windows games, on Linux.

Firstly, that's not my end-game. I'm not particularly interested in running windows games on Linux. I'd rather have Linux games.

Secondly, the idea of having perfect, seamless support for all Windows games is a pipe dream that will never happen unless Microsoft opens up the relevant tech (directx, win32 api or whatever the modern equivalent is), which they will absolutely never do. Even if they did you're only going to get up tp ~95% compatibility. Without the specs (at least) for these techs being open it's always going to be a reverse-engineering effort where you're playing whack-a-mole with new versions of APIs. If you think that this is a reasonable goal you're just setting yourself up for disappointment.

You're not going to get perfect support for all windows games under wine. Not ever. This is the nature of emulation. 100% is not achievable, even with open specs and non-moving targets. Attempting it with windows is bold and commendable but ultimately futile and laughable. Wine can't even run the ~20 year old stuff that I want to run.

This comment highlights a common misconception that plagues all of these discussions.. For the LAST TIME, WINE = WINE IS NOT an EMULATOR.

Reverse engineering, can and often does work better than having access to the source code, provided enough dedication and good enough platforms: nblood vs blood fresh supply is a good example of a reverse engineered lovingly crafted engine doing better than a commercial port.

Wine can't run things that are 20years old, may be up to the projects themselves, and it's highly likely that windows 10 can't either. At this stage the only thing that does actually make more sense to do is to think of the distant future. Apple just deprecated 90% of all games that have a Mac version, because of stubbornly removing 32-bit libraries. A similar thing can and might very well happen on Windows, and on Linux, we have averted the catastrophe once, we can avert it again. I'm positive that at some point, the libraries will be deprecated so badly that we'll simply be bundling them as part of retro gaming, much like we do now for the 8/16 bit stuff. This, you will never be able to do, if you've never ventured into emulation.

A pipe dream it might be, but I'm happy with the vertical slice of games that can reliably be played through wine. I'm also a bit unhappy with the state of "native" games with proprietary licenses.
Actually wine can and does run 20 year old games better than Windows 10 can. Because in wine you can actually set the version of Windows you wish to pretend to be (also known as emulation, but I know it isn't emulation, it is a compatibility wrapper, much like Glide is a wrapper for the 3Dfx API into OpenGL.)
Wine, the great Pretender!
tuubi 7 February 2020 at 4:06 pm UTC
slaapliedjemuch like Glide is a wrapper for the 3Dfx API into OpenGL
Just a little nitpick: While there are several wrappers, Glide is actually the name of the 3Dfx API itself.
slaapliedje 7 February 2020 at 4:33 pm UTC
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tuubi
slaapliedjemuch like Glide is a wrapper for the 3Dfx API into OpenGL
Just a little nitpick: While there are several wrappers, Glide is actually the name of the 3Dfx API itself.
Ha, well in my defense, it's been like 20 years since I used it.
nGlide was the one I was probably thinking of.

It's fun trying to describe to people the difference between emulation, library wrappers and something like FPGA though.
'FPGA is emulation!'
'No, FPGA is hardware recreation.'
'So, emulation?'
'No, it's actual hardware, that is told to act like a specific piece of hardware.'
'So, emulation?'
'no...
'But it's not the same thing!!'
'It's still hardware!'
'But.. it's not the original hardware, so it's emulating it!'
*punches* 'Well, one more non-believer is down...'

Ha, watching the arguments for the Vampire boards for the Amiga is entertaining.
appetrosyan 15 February 2020 at 9:24 pm UTC
slaapliedje
appetrosyan
antisol
scainethink about the end-game, which is perfect, seamless support for all Windows games, on Linux.

Firstly, that's not my end-game. I'm not particularly interested in running windows games on Linux. I'd rather have Linux games.

Secondly, the idea of having perfect, seamless support for all Windows games is a pipe dream that will never happen unless Microsoft opens up the relevant tech (directx, win32 api or whatever the modern equivalent is), which they will absolutely never do. Even if they did you're only going to get up tp ~95% compatibility. Without the specs (at least) for these techs being open it's always going to be a reverse-engineering effort where you're playing whack-a-mole with new versions of APIs. If you think that this is a reasonable goal you're just setting yourself up for disappointment.

You're not going to get perfect support for all windows games under wine. Not ever. This is the nature of emulation. 100% is not achievable, even with open specs and non-moving targets. Attempting it with windows is bold and commendable but ultimately futile and laughable. Wine can't even run the ~20 year old stuff that I want to run.

This comment highlights a common misconception that plagues all of these discussions.. For the LAST TIME, WINE = WINE IS NOT an EMULATOR.

Reverse engineering, can and often does work better than having access to the source code, provided enough dedication and good enough platforms: nblood vs blood fresh supply is a good example of a reverse engineered lovingly crafted engine doing better than a commercial port.

Wine can't run things that are 20years old, may be up to the projects themselves, and it's highly likely that windows 10 can't either. At this stage the only thing that does actually make more sense to do is to think of the distant future. Apple just deprecated 90% of all games that have a Mac version, because of stubbornly removing 32-bit libraries. A similar thing can and might very well happen on Windows, and on Linux, we have averted the catastrophe once, we can avert it again. I'm positive that at some point, the libraries will be deprecated so badly that we'll simply be bundling them as part of retro gaming, much like we do now for the 8/16 bit stuff. This, you will never be able to do, if you've never ventured into emulation.

A pipe dream it might be, but I'm happy with the vertical slice of games that can reliably be played through wine. I'm also a bit unhappy with the state of "native" games with proprietary licenses.
Actually wine can and does run 20 year old games better than Windows 10 can. Because in wine you can actually set the version of Windows you wish to pretend to be (also known as emulation, but I know it isn't emulation, it is a compatibility wrapper, much like Glide is a wrapper for the 3Dfx API into OpenGL.)
Wine, the great Pretender!
slaapliedje
appetrosyan
antisol
scainethink about the end-game, which is perfect, seamless support for all Windows games, on Linux.

Firstly, that's not my end-game. I'm not particularly interested in running windows games on Linux. I'd rather have Linux games.

Secondly, the idea of having perfect, seamless support for all Windows games is a pipe dream that will never happen unless Microsoft opens up the relevant tech (directx, win32 api or whatever the modern equivalent is), which they will absolutely never do. Even if they did you're only going to get up tp ~95% compatibility. Without the specs (at least) for these techs being open it's always going to be a reverse-engineering effort where you're playing whack-a-mole with new versions of APIs. If you think that this is a reasonable goal you're just setting yourself up for disappointment.

You're not going to get perfect support for all windows games under wine. Not ever. This is the nature of emulation. 100% is not achievable, even with open specs and non-moving targets. Attempting it with windows is bold and commendable but ultimately futile and laughable. Wine can't even run the ~20 year old stuff that I want to run.

This comment highlights a common misconception that plagues all of these discussions.. For the LAST TIME, WINE = WINE IS NOT an EMULATOR.

Reverse engineering, can and often does work better than having access to the source code, provided enough dedication and good enough platforms: nblood vs blood fresh supply is a good example of a reverse engineered lovingly crafted engine doing better than a commercial port.

Wine can't run things that are 20years old, may be up to the projects themselves, and it's highly likely that windows 10 can't either. At this stage the only thing that does actually make more sense to do is to think of the distant future. Apple just deprecated 90% of all games that have a Mac version, because of stubbornly removing 32-bit libraries. A similar thing can and might very well happen on Windows, and on Linux, we have averted the catastrophe once, we can avert it again. I'm positive that at some point, the libraries will be deprecated so badly that we'll simply be bundling them as part of retro gaming, much like we do now for the 8/16 bit stuff. This, you will never be able to do, if you've never ventured into emulation.

A pipe dream it might be, but I'm happy with the vertical slice of games that can reliably be played through wine. I'm also a bit unhappy with the state of "native" games with proprietary licenses.
Actually wine can and does run 20 year old games better than Windows 10 can. Because in wine you can actually set the version of Windows you wish to pretend to be (also known as emulation, but I know it isn't emulation, it is a compatibility wrapper, much like Glide is a wrapper for the 3Dfx API into OpenGL.)
Wine, the great Pretender!

While that is mostly true there are some exceptions. My point was that even conceding that Wine cannot do more than Windows, then it is still a valuable asset!
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