Support us on Patreon to keep GamingOnLinux alive. This ensures we have no timed articles and no paywalls. Just good, fresh content! Alternatively, you can donate through PayPal, Flattr, Liberapay or Buy us a Coffee. You can also buy games using our partner links for GOG and Humble Store.

Not something we usually cover here, but it's a fun bit of hardware news. The Raspberry Pi 4 is now official and it's out and ready to pick up.

Interestingly, they also overhauled their home-grown Raspbian Linux OS, as it's now based on Debian 10 Buster. To go along with this, their original graphics stack is being retired in favour of using the Mesa "V3D" driver developed by Eric Anholt at Broadcom. They say it has allowed them to remove "roughly half of the lines of closed-source code in the platform" which is a nice win.

Here's the breakdown of the hardware:

  • A 1.5GHz quad-core 64-bit ARM Cortex-A72 CPU (~3× performance)
  • 1GB, 2GB, or 4GB of LPDDR4 SDRAM
  • Full-throughput Gigabit Ethernet
  • Dual-band 802.11ac wireless networking
  • Bluetooth 5.0
  • Two USB 3.0 and two USB 2.0 ports
  • Dual monitor support, at resolutions up to 4K
  • VideoCore VI graphics, supporting OpenGL ES 3.x
  • 4Kp60 hardware decode of HEVC video
  • Complete compatibility with earlier Raspberry Pi products

You can see their quick announcement video below:

YouTube Thumbnail
YouTube videos require cookies, you must accept their cookies to view. View cookie preferences.
Accept Cookies & Show   Direct Link

The price still sounds great too, especially now with different RAM options (price may be slightly different in various shops stocking them):

  • 1GB - $35/£34
  • 2GB - $45/£44
  • 4GB - $55/£54

For those who love to tinker, it really sounds like a great little unit. I've still never picked one up but I've always wanted one to play with. Sounds like my wait was worth it, might have to set one up as a little media centre of some sort. The additional performance should be quite interesting for gaming too, could also make a good streaming unit with the Steam Link App for Raspberry Pi.

You can read their full announcement here.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Hardware
25 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
The comments on this article are closed.
27 comments
Page: «3/3
  Go to:

Cestus 24 Jun, 2019
finally a worthy upgrade!
razing32 24 Jun, 2019
All i can say is :



Last edited by razing32 on 24 June 2019 at 6:52 pm UTC
Arehandoro 24 Jun, 2019
I have an i5 with 16GB in use for all my main projects, that originally started on a rpi 2 that eventually died. The new updates sound great, though and might be the time to get a new one and tinker a bit more even.
edenist 25 Jun, 2019
Quoting: Xakep_SDK> No mainline support
Thanks, no.

Yeah this is one of a couple of things which really have me torn over raspis. I have a couple, and they are great, but I have to keep in mind they are designed for education purposes. The SD card primary storage just doesn't cut it as any sort of production system. USB storage is an option now I suppose, and just keep a read-only boot partition on the SD card, but....

... no mainline support really irks me. It just seems like them keeping the keys way too close to their chest, and support ultimately is in their hands with kernel release being entirely up to their internal processes.

It's these things which keep me happy with my choice of the La Frite from Libre computer. All of their systems have support pushed upstream, they have u-boot/UEFI and also eMMC storage. A much more robust SBC in my opinion.
jarhead_h 25 Jun, 2019
My laptop is a HP Core2Duo from 2012 that I'm pretty sure would be beaten by this thing.
Dunc 25 Jun, 2019
Quoting: DragunovI personally dislike the Raspbian OS though, I would prefer Vanilla Debian. Right now i'm using Ubuntu Mate..
I know what you mean, but - although it's probably less of an issue with these newer machines - on the original B+, there was a a very noticeable performance difference between Debian (or Arch) and Raspbian.

Quoting: jarhead_hMy laptop is a HP Core2Duo from 2012 that I'm pretty sure would be beaten by this thing.
:D That's a good point. I'm still using a ten-year-old Atom netbook every day, and... yeah... £35, you say?
Dragunov 26 Jun, 2019
Quoting: edenist
Quoting: Xakep_SDK> No mainline support
Thanks, no.

Yeah this is one of a couple of things which really have me torn over raspis. I have a couple, and they are great, but I have to keep in mind they are designed for education purposes. The SD card primary storage just doesn't cut it as any sort of production system. USB storage is an option now I suppose, and just keep a read-only boot partition on the SD card, but....

... no mainline support really irks me. It just seems like them keeping the keys way too close to their chest, and support ultimately is in their hands with kernel release being entirely up to their internal processes.

It's these things which keep me happy with my choice of the La Frite from Libre computer. All of their systems have support pushed upstream, they have u-boot/UEFI and also eMMC storage. A much more robust SBC in my opinion.

The Raspberry PI 3 B+ and the Raspberry PI 4 support booting entirely from USB HDD or SSD. You don't need a boot partition on the SD card any longer. That's what I was trying to say in my previous post. I'm happily running Ubuntu Mate from my Seagate USB Hard Disk Drive.

Oh, and don't forget the 75k software packages in the repository which can be installed using Apt-get.
https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/bionic/armhf


Last edited by Dragunov on 26 June 2019 at 1:35 am UTC
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on Patreon, Liberapay or Paypal. We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!