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Latest Comments by Gryxx
Valve boost player contrast in CS:GO and add Text Filtering
14 June 2020 at 8:10 am UTC

Well, it works. At first I've thought there is no enemy on left picture. Good work.

New Steam Client Beta up with Linux updates, Valve prepping Proton 5.0-5
21 March 2020 at 8:44 am UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: SlackdogHopefully Doom Eternal will be working - I'm prepared to wait whilst clever people work on it. :)
Hopefully it isn't an Eternal wait. Oh well, at least it's not Duke Nukem--you could be waiting Forever.

Puns are strong with you.

Feral Interactive are asking what you want ported to Linux again
13 January 2020 at 7:57 pm UTC Likes: 1

Borderlands 3
CyberPunk 2077
Doom Eternal
The Outer Worlds
Shadow of War
EDIT:
Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines 2
Jedi Fallen Order
Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice
Code Vein

Steam for Linux was started by ex-Microsoft developers
6 January 2020 at 10:33 pm UTC Likes: 2

Quoting: BielFPs
Quoting: mirvI think updates aren't the problem so much as updates not breaking things. The situation is better than it was, and hindsight shows better ways than Valve initially tried, but it remains one aspect of GNU/Linux and gaming that is more troublesome than it should be.

Usually I would agree with you, but games usually require fresh updates (specially with graphic drivers),and while I think Debian is a great distro (since I use at work) they have the habit of not update anything that's not a security issue (even minor bugs/glitches) until a major release, and this is bad for our case as we may have some minor performance issue in some specific game with some specific card and drive version, that need a specific fix in the newest drivers release, etc.

Sure they can backport those packages if necessary, but I think mixing old packages with new packages can be more problematic than just downgrade a faulty package if needed.

Also they don't need to be bleeding edge like vanilla Arch, they could've used some approach like Manjaro, but with more time between those versions (maybe an new release every quarter?) where they could just check if those packages didn't break anything essential.

TL;DR: Debian is stable in general, but takes too long to fix minor problems and implement performance features.

Quoting: mirvIf that were solved, drivers in their current shape, and DXVK of course, and then SteamOS (and maybe the machines too) released....well, things might have turned out different.

You may not believe me now, but I did predicted the "fail" of steam machines since day 1 due to they not working the SteamOS before start to release then to the average public (the machines, not the system)

Back to my first comment, If Steam machines/OS was first released today, the results probably would be different, because of a now more mature Vulkan and the game changer DXVK.
Pretty much best comment. Personally, i chose Tumbleweed, due to mix of fresh packages and relative stability (on top with beeing one of "good" KDE distros). I would like to hear some more recommendations of similar distros- fresh, but not bleeding edge packages and preferably rolling release.

Steam for Linux was started by ex-Microsoft developers
6 January 2020 at 3:08 pm UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: mirvNothing surprising really. Valve's initial efforts on GNU/Linux were always a result of Microsoft's attempts to wall up everything. GNU/Linux wasn't ready for gaming at the time, but for a variety of reasons the potential started to appear and Valve kind of nudged (with a freight train) it along.

What's more surprising to me is Valve continuing. They won't be getting anywhere near a direct return on investments, at least I wouldn't think so, and it seems relatively little of their efforts are tied into Steam itself. Helping drivers, graphics, VR, etc, benefits more than Valve - it does help non-Steam users too. So maybe it's more about continued pressure on Microsoft than anything else.

Just me thinking out loud.
Surprising, but understandable. Before Linux there was barley a choice- while you could game on Mac, i would not propose it as alternative price-wise. During this time there was no one who could oppose Microsoft. It was rather "deal with it or disappear" scenario. Now, there's a backup plan. Now Microsoft most consider its moves, one big misstep along the way can irreversibly push their userbase onto alternatives. You can clearly see in the comments that even small design changes can be turnover point for some. Of course, we are still too small to really count- but i think it is safe to assume that because of use Microsoft started listening to its customers.

Alen Ladavac, co-founder of Croteam has left to join the Google Stadia team, plus other Stadia news
7 October 2019 at 9:33 pm UTC

Quoting: Liam Dawe
Quoting: ShabbyX
Quoting: Liam Dawe
Quoting: ShabbyXIronically, the disadvantage of Linux with Stadia is that chrome doesn't support hardware acceleration in video decoding, so Linux will have a (slightly) higher latency than windows...
What's the latest on this, I'm a bit out of touch since I use Firefox.

The latest is what I just said?
*sigh* let me be a lot more specific then: What is the latest on getting the code accepted into Chromium/Chrome to enable it the same as it is on Windows?

Compile it yourself. Or so i've heard about month ago.

Valve add additional titles to the Steam Play Whitelist
2 August 2019 at 10:51 am UTC

Quoting: Ehvis
Quoting: GryxxHmmm...
Guess i no longer have any excuse to not pickup first two Fallouts.

Lack of time maybe?

That's a good excuse not to play them. It is weak excuse for not buying them

Valve add additional titles to the Steam Play Whitelist
1 August 2019 at 1:24 pm UTC

Hmmm...
Guess i no longer have any excuse to not pickup first two Fallouts.

EDIT: Is my grammar correct? My sentence feels a bit off, although i can't pinpoint what i did wrong.

Canonical have released a statement on Ubuntu and 32bit support, will keep select packages
25 June 2019 at 8:50 am UTC Likes: 4

Quoting: TheSHEEEP
Quoting: Gryxx1. Mobile internet. It is not viable to redownload games in such scenario.
We're talking about desktop usage here. What does mobile internet have to do with that?
The fringe case that one is travelling and has to use tethering? Who'd download games in that scenario and not beforehand the games they want to play on the road?

Quoting: Gryxx2.It is my responsibility of course. But i wanted to show real world use case when even 2 TB are not enough.
That's an extreme case. You can always find extreme cases that make any option look worse than it would be for 99% of people 99% of the time.

Quoting: Gryxx3. I context of my previous comments i mean "It is harder for newbies to add external drives when using flatpak Steam". And as you see i focusing on scenario small SSD and secondary HDD. I don't think new user would know how to change default flatpak location, or to allow it to see main file system.
True, but that's why I was talking about something like flatpak/Snap. A more user-friendly variant of those, with a proper UI configuration tool, setup wizard, etc.
I don't like either flatpak nor Snap right now, because I think they aren't nearly as easy to use as they should be... especially if you mix them with "normal" PPA installation. Ugh *shudders*.

Quoting: Gryxx4. It is not fair, but it doesn't mean that we have to make things harder for users that can't have top rigs.
If making things easier for the majority means making it harder for a minority, then I'm all for it, as long as it is within reason. "The need of the many..."
And I consider the small bloat a Snap/flatpak-like approach would introduce absolutely reasonable.
1. Small village. No other option then LTE
2. Off topic: I Really like comment system here. I just argued over the same damn thing with another person. Glad we understand each other now :)
3. Most "Windows Gaming Rig" i sell to customers have 128 or 256 GB system SSD, and hard drive for games. I would say they could not handle setting this up theirselvses (like they do now on windows) if they were to use Flatpak. But again it comes down to point 2, witch we agree on.
4. I still prefer having choice. I'm not Ubuntu user (and i could say that i never been, despite using it from time to time), and a reason for that is that they does not give me level of freedom that i need. As to minority/majority- i don't feel comfortable to discuss that, especially in my not native language.

Canonical have released a statement on Ubuntu and 32bit support, will keep select packages
25 June 2019 at 8:19 am UTC Likes: 1

1. Mobile internet. It is not viable to redownload games in such scenario.
2.It is my responsibility of course. But i wanted to show real world use case when even 2 TB are not enough.
3. I context of my previous comments i mean "It is harder for newbies to add external drives when using flatpak Steam". And as you see i focusing on scenario small SSD and secondary HDD. I don't think new user would know how to change default flatpak location, or to allow it to see main file system.
4. It is not fair, but it doesn't mean that we have to make things harder for users that can't have top rigs.

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