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Latest Comments by Ray54
Croteam are having a big sale to celebrate 25 years
18 June 2018 at 5:23 pm UTC

Kels
Flabb
Ray54My Steam library entry for Serious Sam Fusion now has 3 items: The First Encounter, flat support and BFE. However, when I start Fusion it automatically goes into BFE. I was expecting a menu in Fusion giving me an option of First Encounter or BFE (as I have no separate First Encounter game listed in Linux Steam)?
Have you opened the campaign menu? Fusion chooses the theme of the latest game you have for the menu, so if you have SS3, then it'll always boot with SS3 theme. But in the campaign menu you should see all campaigns that you have access for.

I had the same problem. For a new player it's incredibly non-intuitive, and nothing in the initial menus makes it clear you have to go two levels down in order to choose which game you're playing.

For all the trouble they went to making all those cool and surprisingly exhaustive menus, they seriously dropped the ball there.
Thanks Flabb and Kels for your help on how to find the game menus. Yes, every time I got to the BFE menu I canceled, as I had assumed I had missed the choose game menu. I also needed to play around with graphics and game settings to get the games running reliably under Fusion, as I have an older gaming machine. I have been playing TFE under Fusion quite a bit since installing, and I am loving the game on Linux.

Kels: I agree that putting the game selection 2 levels down in the first listed game's menu tree is a UI design error. Croteam are excellent designers and coders, so I hope that issue will be fixed soon.

Croteam are having a big sale to celebrate 25 years
17 June 2018 at 11:18 pm UTC

Flabb
Ray54Can I assume that Serious Sam Classics: Revolution would give me HD TFE and HD TSE under fusion (even if other parts of Revolution may not work) or do I need to buy HD TFE and TSE separately?
No, Revolution is completely different project from another developer, it won't give access to any Fusion's content. To play SSHD in Fusion, you need to buy HD TFE and TSE on Steam.
My Steam library entry for Serious Sam Fusion now has 3 items: The First Encounter, flat support and BFE. However, when I start Fusion it automatically goes into BFE. I was expecting a menu in Fusion giving me an option of First Encounter or BFE (as I have no separate First Encounter game listed in Linux Steam)?

I have re-installed Fusion, but this only seemed to add an option to allow me to use mods with BFE. I cannot install HD TFE directly under Linux as it is a Window's only game and installing under Wine does not help. So, has anyone else got TFE with BFE using Fusion working under Linux?

Croteam are having a big sale to celebrate 25 years
17 June 2018 at 10:52 am UTC

Flabb
Ray54I find this sale incredibly confusing.

What I currently have is Serious Sam 3 BFE and Serious Sam Fusion 2017 Beta on Steam. I also have a Serious Sam 2 Windows CD (free from a graphics card purchase). What I want, is to get Serious Sam 1 and 2 running under Fusion on Linux Mint. I do not understand how you use fusion and what do I need to buy?
For clarification: Fusion is, basically, a compilation of canonical Serious Sam titles (namely HD TFE, HD TSE, BFE and DLCs for them) running on the latest version of Serious Engine. This compilation is expected to be updated in the very long run - Croteam plan to use it as a testing polygon for all new features of their engine and add new canonical SS games as they release.
To play these games in Fusion, you need to own the respective standalone games on your Steam account. For example, if you want to play HD TSE in Fusion, you need to buy standalone HD TSE, and the same applies to other games. You can't buy Fusion versions directly.
And about SS2 - if you mean the game from 2005, then I've got bad news - it's Windows-only, and Croteam don't plan to add it to Fusion. The reason is - they don't consider this game canon, and also porting it to the newest engine would require too much work. However, they plan to make an alternative sequel for TSE that will be loosely based on original SS2... After they make SS4 and TTP2.

Thank you Flabb for your excellent advice, I now understand that Fusion is not a DLC, but a separately executable hub. Also that the Second Encounter is not the same as SS2. Can I assume that Serious Sam Classics: Revolution would give me HD TFE and HD TSE under fusion (even if other parts of Revolution may not work) or do I need to buy HD TFE and TSE separately?

Croteam are having a big sale to celebrate 25 years
17 June 2018 at 9:20 am UTC

I find this sale incredibly confusing.

What I currently have is Serious Sam 3 BFE and Serious Sam Fusion 2017 Beta on Steam. I also have a Serious Sam 2 Windows CD (free from a graphics card purchase). What I want, is to get Serious Sam 1 and 2 running under Fusion on Linux Mint. I do not understand how you use fusion and what do I need to buy?

winepak, a project to get Windows games packaged with Wine & Flatpak for an easy Linux installation
13 June 2018 at 8:45 pm UTC Likes: 1

I think I could find a flatpack of wine version 1.6 extremely useful, as about 6 of my old games (especially the early Command and Conquer series) need that version to play for more than 10 mins without crashing. However, I also need a newer version of wine for running Windows Steam and Steam based Windows games. Currently, I end up with the old wine 1.6 version as my default and use a new wine-staging version for Steam (as a staging version can co-exist with other versions of wine). I know I can use PlayOnLinux to install multiple versions of wine, but that needs virtual drives setting up. A flatpack of wine version 1.6 sounds much easier, but would it work as I expect?

Intel has confirmed their plans for a discrete GPU to release in 2020
12 June 2018 at 9:14 pm UTC

ewertonurias"lower prices too"?
Omg... I'm Brazilian, our salary is R$ 1000, and a "GTX 1060 Galaxy 6GB 192Bits here costs R$ 1600.
Here practically everything is inaccessible.

Where do you live, it's also so expensive? Asking for curiosity.

I assume that Brazilian government import duties on computers and computer parts is still extremely high, as it was a few years ago when I was looking at deploying a large number of servers to Brazil (before I retired). The only way I found to reduce the cost back then was to contract with Dell computers, as they had an assembly plant in Brazil. I would not expect any of the graphics card board manufacturers to have an assembly plant in Brazil. So sorry, but I suspect that the end-user price of graphics cards in Brazil will be dominated by the government import duties.

Intel has confirmed their plans for a discrete GPU to release in 2020
12 June 2018 at 8:30 pm UTC Likes: 1

Seems like an obvious business for Intel to get into, with both their skills and FAB resources. I think there would be a reasonable chance for a 3rd player in the top-end graphics chip market, as the current 2 horse race is historically unusual. Also as all the gaming graphics board manufacturers are able to make boards for either NVidia or AMD chips, so them also making boards for Intel chips seems logical. I guess Intel execs have said "look at all the profit NVidia has made these last few years, we can do that too". From a Linux gaming point of view, with Intel's interest in open source drivers, then I don't see any down-side.

Play It Now - Flamebreak
6 June 2018 at 8:52 am UTC Likes: 1

I very much appreciate what you are doing with this new series. I wonder if occasionally you could cover some simpler games that do not require much investment in time (learning and completing). I particularly like games where there is a demo level to try before buying.

The Linux-powered Atari VCS will accept pre-orders May 30th, shipping next year
2 May 2018 at 8:57 am UTC

As has been pointed out repeatedly, Atari cannot compete directly against Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo, as Atari have very limited resources. So they must have a plan to hit an adequately sized sub-part of the console market cheaply. This plan has not been divulged yet, so presumably is either not fully-formed or needs to be kept secret for a while longer. So the current game is "guess the plan"!

The Linux-powered Atari VCS will accept pre-orders May 30th, shipping next year
1 May 2018 at 5:32 pm UTC

What should take a small team of engineers, designers and sales people long to produce an almost off-the-shelf small steam box? Historically, Atari did not take long (also with a small team) getting their Atari 520STM designed and into production 25 years ago. Even starting from scratch I think they can do it in less than a year. My plan for the year (not too serious):
1. Take 3 Months in getting hardware sorted.
Off the shelf parts working as a mini-steam-machine on a bench (e.g. Ryzen 3 2200, low-profile mini-itx motherboard).
Sort out simple cooling solution and simple wall-wart type PSU.

2. Take 3 months in getting software sorted.
Get licences to a few older Linux games and Atari Vault.
Get Valve support and agreement to use Atari branding on SteamOS.
Check software works on Platform and fix.

3. Take 3 months in finding a capable Chinese Manufacturer/Integrator.
Get good supply deals and do Q.A. on prototypes.

4. Take 3 months in getting marketing and sales channels operational.
Launch plan and early press release of units.

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