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AMD Ryzen 9 'Threadripper' announced with up to 16 cores

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Well then, AMD are truly back in the game now aren't they! They have announced the AMD Ryzen 9 'Threadripper' which will come with up to 16 cores.

See their announcement video:
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There's been a bunch of leaks surrounding Threadripper and I don't know how true they are, but the line-up could be something like this (source):
image

Those are some incredibly impressive specifications. Everyone I've spoken to with a current Ryzen chip is incredibly happy with it, so it certainly seems like AMD is fully back on form. They have a good chip design, with a decent roadmap and now some even more powerful chips coming out.

There's also this roadmap floating around:
image

It's going to be an interesting few years, since Intel finally have some proper competition once again, we will see things from both sides continue to move at a quicker pace now. The CPU wars are back and we should all win, since Intel's domination seems to firmly be over.

My i7 is starting to feel a little old now, might be upgrade time sometime next year. Zen 2 could be an ideal upgrade for me, but ideally I will be looking for a new monitor and GPU first. My current monitor doesn't turn on half the time now which is becoming a real nuisance to work with.

What do you think to the idea of Threadripper? Catchy name. Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: AMD, Hardware
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
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27 comments
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Eike 17 May, 2017
Quoting: m0nt3On mediumish settings I have not seen below 49. However I am not very far in, just got to the apartment.

Thanks!
I have a reasonable frame rate, but severe dips from time to time...
Did you take a look at CPU (and GPU) usage?
Leopard 17 May, 2017
Threadripper reminds me that
m0nt3 17 May, 2017
Quoting: Eike
Quoting: m0nt3On mediumish settings I have not seen below 49. However I am not very far in, just got to the apartment.

Thanks!
I have a reasonable frame rate, but severe dips from time to time...
Did you take a look at CPU (and GPU) usage?

I did not, but I will records some gameplay and post it on my youtube channel with gallium hud enabled. Although, OBS usually causes a bit of a hit.
HollowSoldier 17 May, 2017
Probably not AM4, so it isn't for the regular human being.
MayeulC 17 May, 2017
Now, this is what I've been waiting for to upgrade!

The second thing is money. Anyone has a bit of extra cash to spare? :P
Ulty 17 May, 2017
QuoteMy current monitor doesn't turn on half the time now which is becoming a real nuisance to work with.

Thats usually the capacitors in the monitors power-supply dieing. I had to replace them in my 120 Hz monitor 2 years after I bought it with the same symptoms of it not turning on properly. After that it worked like a charm again :)

All you need is a soldering iron, replacement capacitors with the same capacity and same or higher voltage raitings. A bit of luck and determination is required to take the display and the bezel apart without breaking most of the little plastic anchors.

Look for any capacitors with a bulging top and replace them.



And don't forget to document the opening process with lots of pictures, else you might not be able to close it up again.
Purple Library Guy 17 May, 2017
Quoting: lucinos
Quoting: Andrei B.Wow, 7nm.. Impressive.
Ten years ago we thought that 23nm was the physical limit.

I don't remember that. I for many years now remember the physical limit be considered around 5 nm (and it is getting there now as it seems). Moore's Law also considered to be halted in 2010s. 7nm is really impressive but not too unrealistic. Intel had stopped at 14nm for a some time now and either intel wanted Amd to catch up or already is getting proportionally way more difficult. Of course now I believe we Moore's Law is near the end and will not be continued in 2020s as already have happened for many years now with frequencies. In any case 1nm is very near the atomic scale.

As to why they might have waited . . . the brute fact is that while microprocessor factories can, once built, churn out nearly arbitrary numbers of chips for cheap, they are incredibly expensive to build in the first place. It's an amazingly capital-intensive business, and the smaller scale you get, the more expensive the factory. So they probably paused at 14nm for as long as they could get away with because they wanted to make some money on the existing facilities before spending it all on the next generation.
STiAT 17 May, 2017
Just 16? Ohh :-(. I have 4, the upgrade is almost not worth it XD.
MayeulC 17 May, 2017
Quoting: STiATJust 16? Ohh :-(. I have 4, the upgrade is almost not worth it XD.

Don't worry, it makes for 32 threads with SMT. Oh, well, you can still wait for the Epyc server chip, which has 32 cores, which makes 64 threads, if that's not enough.

One thing to note is that it is quite close to NUMA architecture (multi-socket), powered by AMD's "Infinity Fabric" (some sort of memory exchange bus similar to PCI). Non-NUMA aware workloads might perform less well on such architectures, but it was already the same on the Ryzen 7, that had two "core complexes". Hopefully, the scheduler will help with that, if the workloads don't do anything stupid like start a thread on each core when memory locality is critical.

Look at those server chips, man... *goes back counting his (few) banknotes*
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