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The developer of VK9, another rather interesting compatibility layer has advanced further with the announcement of another completed milestone.

Much like DXVK, it aims to push Direct3D over to Vulkan, while DXVK focuses on D3D11 and D3D10 the VK9 project is fixed on D3D9.

Writing about hitting the 29th milestone, the developer said this on their blog:

VK9 has reached it's 29th milestone. Reaching this milestone required further shader enhancements including support for applications which set a vertex shader but no pixel shader. In addition to this there are a number of fixes including proper NOOVERWRITE support which fixed the graphical corruption in UT99. This release also no longer depends on the push descriptor extension so VK9 should now be compatible with the closed source AMD driver. New 32bit and 64bit builds are available on Github.

Always fun to watch these projects progress, give it another year and it will be exciting to see what we can do with it. They have quite a few milestones left to achieve, which you can find on the Roadmap.

Find it on GitHub.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Vulkan
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Shmerl 17 Dec, 2018
Quoting: KristianBut if running a game under Wine reduces the FPS say from 150 to 100 or from 200 to 150 the general public will tend to perceive that as an utter failure and totally unacceptable. It will dissuade them from switching and the Linux marketshare will stay low.

Perception is everything.

I highly doubt you'll be able to notice framerate drop from 200 to 150 fps. As you said, perception is everything. So if Wine has some performance hit, but it's above noticeable - who cares.


Last edited by Shmerl on 17 December 2018 at 4:05 am UTC
massatt212 17 Dec, 2018
Quoting: mylka
Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: jensAre there any heavy weight DX9 games?

The Witcher 2 is quite heavy (Windows version is using DX9), but it has an OpenGL wrapped port by Virtual Programming already.

this game runs pretty well on 5yr old cards. if you have an older card, you wont have vulkan

heavy weight DX9 games are nothing for todays cards. even cheap ones like rx570 can handle them easily

Quoting: massatt212he needs to get games running to catch valve eyes, or he can be a scammer or he could just decide to abandon the project, valve needs to see hug progress before supporting him, and their are tones of games that still use DX9

i dont think this means that more games will work, but you could have more FPS.
if they can translate DX9 to VULKAN, they can translate DX9 to OpenGL and thats what proton already does
how many games would profit from VK9? skyrim
are there any other dx9 only games with bad performance?

edit:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkPys83pfjQ
he has 60FPS on ultra with a 1060. VR9 woudlnt help him at all

Their are some games with Graphical Glitches
Like Strider and Darksiders 2 Public Beta
herbert 17 Dec, 2018
Quoting: KristianI have often seen Linux ports or games running under Wine reduce performance by double digit FPS and/or % and people hailing that as acceptable since performance is still good and they may have an otherwise great point.

But if running a game under Wine reduces the FPS say from 150 to 100 or from 200 to 150 the general public will tend to perceive that as an utter failure and totally unacceptable. It will dissuade them from switching and the Linux marketshare will stay low.

Perception is everything. So it is crucial to get Linux performance as near to Windows performance as possible,if it can be faster even better.

Edit:

If I remember the numbers correctly, The Witcher 2 ports performance was bad enough that it is a way way bigger performance loss than what the general public would accept.

Also another attitude I have sometimes seen is "Oh it is fine that game is not DX11 exclusive, its DX9 mode works fine under Wine" neither the general public nor hardcore gamers share that attitude. They think: "Why should I switch to Linux if that means giving up eyecandy or features?".

Which is why projects such as DXVK are so important.

Afaik, the human eyes cannot percept any change above 30 fps.
Cybolic 17 Dec, 2018
Quoting: Jiskin
Quoting: KristianI have often seen Linux ports or games running under Wine reduce performance by double digit FPS and/or % and people hailing that as acceptable since performance is still good and they may have an otherwise great point.

But if running a game under Wine reduces the FPS say from 150 to 100 or from 200 to 150 the general public will tend to perceive that as an utter failure and totally unacceptable. It will dissuade them from switching and the Linux marketshare will stay low.

Perception is everything. So it is crucial to get Linux performance as near to Windows performance as possible,if it can be faster even better.

Edit:

If I remember the numbers correctly, The Witcher 2 ports performance was bad enough that it is a way way bigger performance loss than what the general public would accept.

Also another attitude I have sometimes seen is "Oh it is fine that game is not DX11 exclusive, its DX9 mode works fine under Wine" neither the general public nor hardcore gamers share that attitude. They think: "Why should I switch to Linux if that means giving up eyecandy or features?".

Which is why projects such as DXVK are so important.

Afaik, the human eyes cannot percept any change above 30 fps.

It's highly subjective. In general, humans perceive anything over 25/30 FPS as "continuous" and anything over 60 FPS as "smooth" but most can distinguish between 30 and 60 FPS and quite a few can recognise changes between 60 and 120 FPS. Above that, things get extremely subjective and most people can't see any difference.
Hubro 17 Dec, 2018
Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: KristianBut if running a game under Wine reduces the FPS say from 150 to 100 or from 200 to 150 the general public will tend to perceive that as an utter failure and totally unacceptable. It will dissuade them from switching and the Linux marketshare will stay low.

Perception is everything.

I highly doubt you'll be able to notice framerate drop from 200 to 150 fps. As you said, perception is everything. So if Wine has some performance hit, but it's above noticeable - who cares.

I think you underestimate how much people care about frame rates. People aren't perfect rational beings. Everything else being equal, if one platform gives you 30-40% better performance than another platform, even if the end result feels very much identical, most people will probably choose the better performing one.

Hell, significantly better performance also (probably) means more efficient use of the hardware, meaning less power usage per rendered frame. That's very important to some people, especially laptop users.
Kristian 17 Dec, 2018
Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: KristianBut if running a game under Wine reduces the FPS say from 150 to 100 or from 200 to 150 the general public will tend to perceive that as an utter failure and totally unacceptable. It will dissuade them from switching and the Linux marketshare will stay low.

Perception is everything.

I highly doubt you'll be able to notice framerate drop from 200 to 150 fps. As you said, perception is everything. So if Wine has some performance hit, but it's above noticeable - who cares.

My point was about various articles, reviews etc being published. When people read about those kind of numbers they react negatively.
Ardje 17 Dec, 2018
Quoting: KristianMy point was about various articles, reviews etc being published. When people read about those kind of numbers they react negatively.
People always react negatively. Like me, right now. :-).
mylka 17 Dec, 2018
Quoting: massatt212
Quoting: mylka
Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: jensAre there any heavy weight DX9 games?

The Witcher 2 is quite heavy (Windows version is using DX9), but it has an OpenGL wrapped port by Virtual Programming already.

this game runs pretty well on 5yr old cards. if you have an older card, you wont have vulkan

heavy weight DX9 games are nothing for todays cards. even cheap ones like rx570 can handle them easily

Quoting: massatt212he needs to get games running to catch valve eyes, or he can be a scammer or he could just decide to abandon the project, valve needs to see hug progress before supporting him, and their are tones of games that still use DX9

i dont think this means that more games will work, but you could have more FPS.
if they can translate DX9 to VULKAN, they can translate DX9 to OpenGL and thats what proton already does
how many games would profit from VK9? skyrim
are there any other dx9 only games with bad performance?

edit:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkPys83pfjQ
he has 60FPS on ultra with a 1060. VR9 woudlnt help him at all

Their are some games with Graphical Glitches
Like Strider and Darksiders 2 Public Beta

https://store.steampowered.com/app/235210/STRIDER/
minimum: DirectX: Version 11
herbert 17 Dec, 2018
Quoting: Cybolic
Quoting: Jiskin
Quoting: KristianI have often seen Linux ports or games running under Wine reduce performance by double digit FPS and/or % and people hailing that as acceptable since performance is still good and they may have an otherwise great point.

But if running a game under Wine reduces the FPS say from 150 to 100 or from 200 to 150 the general public will tend to perceive that as an utter failure and totally unacceptable. It will dissuade them from switching and the Linux marketshare will stay low.

Perception is everything. So it is crucial to get Linux performance as near to Windows performance as possible,if it can be faster even better.

Edit:

If I remember the numbers correctly, The Witcher 2 ports performance was bad enough that it is a way way bigger performance loss than what the general public would accept.

Also another attitude I have sometimes seen is "Oh it is fine that game is not DX11 exclusive, its DX9 mode works fine under Wine" neither the general public nor hardcore gamers share that attitude. They think: "Why should I switch to Linux if that means giving up eyecandy or features?".

Which is why projects such as DXVK are so important.

Afaik, the human eyes cannot percept any change above 30 fps.

It's highly subjective. In general, humans perceive anything over 25/30 FPS as "continuous" and anything over 60 FPS as "smooth" but most can distinguish between 30 and 60 FPS and quite a few can recognise changes between 60 and 120 FPS. Above that, things get extremely subjective and most people can't see any difference.

Thanks for the clarification!
mirv 17 Dec, 2018
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Just as a small chime in, I'm really hopeful for this project. I know wine already handles DX9 -> OpenGL translation relatively well, it does have a performance hit (for me, anyway). Vulkan drivers are likely to be better than OpenGL, purely at a driver level, for doing the same work, and will help for that reason alone.

So my hardware is relatively old now, and it's not the graphics card which will bottleneck most gaming through wine. Or most gamaing at all really. I do see a big difference in CPU-side improvements, and there are games I couldn't play through "normal" wine, but could play quite happily with gallium-nine (MW:Online, Dishonoured, Space Marine, for example). So if VK9 could help me regain that level of playability, then yes, I'd be quite happy.

Glad to see this project is still progressing.
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