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Update: The developer did change their mind and it's now on GOG for Linux.

Original article:

Supraland released for Linux on Steam on July 2nd and it just released on GOG today but it seems the Linux version will not be heading to GOG.

What is Supraland? It's a very highly rated first-person action and puzzle game, inspired by the likes of Zelda, Metroid and Portal. It's popular, with an "Overwhelmingly Positive" rating on Steam from over two thousands user reviews and from my time spent in the demo, I can see why as it was pretty sweet.

Speaking in their official Discord server, users questioned the developer to find out about a possible Linux release on GOG, since it's only available for Windows there currently. The reply was a little…unexpected:

Their further comments on it were a little more reasonable and understandable, mostly mentioning lower sales on Linux and again on GOG. Even so, that's a pretty naive and hostile attitude to take towards a store (GOG) and platform (Linux) both of which you only just started supporting.

After speaking to the developer myself, they said it was taken out of context (not that I see how, I followed the whole conversation personally). In reply to the same user who also posted this information on GOG, the developer said:

With the "for the sake of it" comment I was refering to a case of "I will only buy on gog because I want it DRM-free" but it IS DRM-free on Steam since forever. This ignorance and "for the sake of it" attitude made me a little angry.
I have not a single bad thought about gog.

They moved onto saying the Linux version performs poorly compared to the Windows version, saying it's better in Proton (which they also said slightly differently on the GOG forum and here too) so they don't want to give "a version that is inferior for reasons I cannot change". So, they're basically telling people on GOG to use Wine/Proton.

So for now, if you want to play the Linux version of Supraland, it's sadly Steam only. Although, going by their other comments it seems they're not confident on actually keeping the Linux version up.

Supra Games are also currently crowdfunding for Supraland 2 on Kickstarter, which is confirmed to be coming to Linux as well.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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120 comments
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Pit 10 Jul, 2019
[quote=Chronarius]
Quoting: stanIf it’s on Steam then it’s not DRM-free, because it requires Steam.

Sorry, for being so blunt: B U L L S H I T ! ! !

The game dosn't require Steam! It runs perfectly without it!

But that doesn't help much. I'm against DRM, therefore by no way I'll get a Steam account. If I cancel my GOG account, I can keep and play all my games. And do so legally. What you 'buy' in Steam is legally tied to your account. So even if you would keep your DRM-free game (by copying it out of the steam folders) when closing the account, it legally is a pirated copy.

QuoteIf you consider the need of the Steam Client for downloading the game as DRM then GOG is also not DRM-free! As it requieres either a Browser or the Galaxy client plus an account.

Well, show me anything you buy online for download that you don't need an account for. The DRM-question is whether you can use and keep the bought item without the account. For Steam that's a NO.
And download from GOG you can with any browser, or gogrepo.py, or lgogdownloader. Those are open source. The API for downloading is open.

QuoteAnyhow it is not DRM in both cases. DRM measures control "how" you can use a "digital product", but NOT "how" you acquire and download an digital product.
Yep, and the 'how to use' is why Steam itself is DRM Thanks for pointing out yourself


Last edited by Pit on 10 July 2019 at 3:37 pm UTC
appetrosyan 10 Jul, 2019
Quoting: TheSHEEEP
Quoting: appetrosyanJust because YOU haven't put DRM in your game, by publishing on Steam you're restricting my ability to share it. For example, I can lend a GOG game to a friend. He can play the game at the same time as I am playing something else. I can't do that on Steam.
You can do exactly that with Steam, too. It's called Family Share. Been doing that many years with my GF for some games. She can play something from my lib while I play something else. Only requirement is that both have Steam, but since that is free, it's a non-issue.

I will have to disagree on that one.

Sorry to disappoint but you can't "exactly" do that. Steam Family sharing is a huge nuissance, and is no better than sharing your credentials with someone on a different PC. For example, if you and the person you shared with decide to play the same game - one of you's kicked out. Fair but it doesn't happen on GOG.

Another example, if you have shared the library with someone and you and your friend decide to play the game, one of you will be kicked out. The only way to circumvent this is to start Steam in Offline mode, which in some cases prevents games from launching at all.
appetrosyan 10 Jul, 2019
Quoting: TheBard
Quoting: appetrosyanSurprisingly this post makes me Ok with it. Not because he's right, but because I don't want to give him any money for being so stupid.

Could we avoid to insult devs and especially devs that port their games on Linux. Furthermore, if the game is really DRM-Free on Steam, what you describe is possible (it's just a copy!)

I didn't insult the dev, just his argument.

Also, I'd like to see how you're going to "just copy" across different platforms.
x_wing 10 Jul, 2019
Quoting: appetrosyanAlso, I'd like to see how you're going to "just copy" across different platforms.

Pretty much the same way you do on GOG: download the native version of each platform and proceed to "just copy" where ever you want.
TheSHEEEP 10 Jul, 2019
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[quote=Pit]
Quoting: Chronarius
Quoting: stanIf it’s on Steam then it’s not DRM-free, because it requires Steam.

Sorry, for being so blunt: B U L L S H I T ! ! !

The game dosn't require Steam! It runs perfectly without it!

But that doesn't help much. I'm against DRM, therefore by no way I'll get a Steam account. If I cancel my GOG account, I can keep and play all my games. And do so legally. What you 'buy' in Steam is legally tied to your account. So even if you would keep your DRM-free game (by copying it out of the steam folders) when closing the account, it legally is a pirated copy.
Your argument is based on an eventuality that will simply never happen. You think police will kick down your door and arrest you for using a copy of a game you bought some time ago, but no longer "own"? Come on!
Might as well argue that you can't play your GOG games any more if you get abducted by aliens and they only have an old Commodore lying around.

Preparing for such an eventuality makes about as much sense as never using ROMs to play old games, as you are actually only allowed to play ROMs of games you own (and afaik only if you made the ROM yourself).
That's the very essence of tinfoil-hattery. Why waste valuable lifetime to prepare for something that will never happen? Just so, that in the 0.005% of it happening you can point and say "Told you so!"?

While, even if that happened, everyone would just rage for a moment and then move on and buy the games they actually still want to play somewhere else, for the price of a meal...
Seriously, all my games on Steam could be gone in this very moment and I'd be all "Well, that's too bad.". This is not some kind of physical collection I'm carrying around with me. So I really just can't get into the mindset of this "apocalypse day" preparation.


Last edited by TheSHEEEP on 10 July 2019 at 4:32 pm UTC
BOYSSSSS 10 Jul, 2019
Quoting: TheSHEEEPYour argument is based on an eventuality that will simply never happen. You think police will kick down your door and arrest you for using a copy of a game you bought some time ago, but no longer "own"? Come on!
Might as well argue that you can't play your GOG games any more if you get abducted by aliens and they only have an old Commodore lying around.

Preparing for such an eventuality makes about as much sense as never using ROMs to play old games, as you are actually only allowed to play ROMs of games you own (and afaik only if you made the ROM yourself).
That's the very essence of tinfoil-hattery. Why waste valuable lifetime to prepare for something that will never happen? Just so, that in the 0.005% of it happening you can point and say "Told you so!"?
Very well said. I've been wondering how best to respond to people crying about Valve's TOS, because it doesn't include text that says you can keep your games you bought that run without the Steam Client, even if Steam closes shop.
BOYSSSSS 10 Jul, 2019
What I find funny is majority of people who refuse to use Steam also have NVIDIA GPUs.
Let's create a doomsday scenario for NVIDIA.
NVIDIA closes shop, you have a 500$ GPU, the Open-Source driver is SH*T because NVIDIA doesn't release the firmware/microcodes for their GPUs, you can only play games with the proprietary driver that is rapidly aging, The proprietary driver doesn't work on the new Kernel.
What now?
Ketil 10 Jul, 2019
Quoting: BOYSSSSS
Quoting: TheSHEEEPYour argument is based on an eventuality that will simply never happen. You think police will kick down your door and arrest you for using a copy of a game you bought some time ago, but no longer "own"? Come on!
Might as well argue that you can't play your GOG games any more if you get abducted by aliens and they only have an old Commodore lying around.

Preparing for such an eventuality makes about as much sense as never using ROMs to play old games, as you are actually only allowed to play ROMs of games you own (and afaik only if you made the ROM yourself).
That's the very essence of tinfoil-hattery. Why waste valuable lifetime to prepare for something that will never happen? Just so, that in the 0.005% of it happening you can point and say "Told you so!"?
Very well said. I've been wondering how best to respond to people crying about Valve's TOS, because it doesn't include text that says you can keep your games you bought that run without the Steam Client, even if Steam closes shop.
According to steam support, you can keep playing games after deleting your account if that game doesn't require a steam account. I expect this to apply to anything that doesn't require the steam client to run after it has been installed.

Legally speaking, I expect you are allowed to play anything DRM-free that you have paid for in most countries even if it's against the TOS of the store. That is, as long as you haven't transferred the copy legally or illegally to anyone else first.
Solitary 10 Jul, 2019
Quoting: appetrosyan... For example, if you and the person you shared with decide to play the same game - one of you's kicked out. Fair but it doesn't happen on GOG.

You do realize that's not legal though, right? Just because you bought DRM-free game doesn't mean you can just copy it to your buddy and play it together. So I am not sure what is your point here,... that GOG let´s you break the law? At that point just let your friend torrent it, it will save you the whole dilemma. What Steam does might be nuisance, but also the correct way. In true sense of the term, yes... kicking you off is DRM. Family Share manages the rights to your license and won't let you use one license by two people. I am just not so sure that it harms your rights, because you have no right to use the license by multiple people at once to begin with.
Mohandevir 10 Jul, 2019
Talking about DRM... There was an update to Stadia's FAQ page:

https://support.google.com/stadia/answer/9338946?hl=en

From the FAQ:

"What happens to a game I bought if the publisher stops supporting Stadia in the future? Can I still play the game?
Yes. Once you purchase the game, you own the right to play it. In the future, it is possible that some games may no longer be available for new purchases, but existing players will still be able to play the game. Outside of unforeseen circumstances, Stadia will aim to keep any previously purchased title available for gameplay."

Similar to Steam, it seems.
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