Support us on Patreon to keep GamingOnLinux alive. This ensures we have no timed articles and no paywalls. Just good, fresh content! Alternatively, you can donate through PayPal, Flattr, Liberapay or Buy us a Coffee. You can also buy games using our partner links for GOG and Humble Store.

Rather than doing away with the loot boxes system, Valve are going with whatever loophole they can it seems. They've updated Counter-Strike: Global Offensive just for French players to include an X-ray Scanner.

It's no secret that many countries are looking into the issues surrounding loot box gambling, something I am happy about because it's a terrible system. Valve also have issues with France, especially considering the recent legal ruling about reselling your digital games.

So what have Valve done? If you play Counter-Strike: Global Offensive in France you now have to buy the P250 | X-Ray non-tradable item. After that, you gain access to the crate scanning ability. However, once you scan a crate you're then stuck with that until you buy the item shown, even if you don't want it. On top of that, French players also cannot buy these crates from the Steam Market any more.

Here's a good video that shows it off:

YouTube Thumbnail
YouTube videos require cookies, you must accept their cookies to view. View cookie preferences.
Accept Cookies & Show   Direct Link

Honestly, I hope Valve take some lessons being learned with Dota Underlords to apply to their older games like CS:GO. A Battle Pass system is a far nicer way to monetize a free game in my opinion. The most important thing being you know what you're going to get and when, which would make me personally more likely to give over my own monies. However, that would completely mess up their Steam Marketplace which they probably earn a fair bit from which is why they're not doing it. I'm sure there would be ways around it to still make it a thing though, there's a lot of smart people at Valve.

See the release notes here and find CS:GO free on Steam.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
8 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
33 comments
Page: «2/4»
  Go to:

elisto 1 Oct, 2019
PatolaGame developers/publishers might not be the most honest people, but giving power to politicians to rule over the gaming market is the worst possible thing to do. Just give time for the market to go where users want. More regulation causes less competition, which slows or even prevents that process.

I sure love having led in my water supply.
The market care only for one thing is profit, "micro"transaction are profitable therefore any sensible company will implement it.
The only thing that competition bring is monopoly.
Business will always struggle until the eat the competition or merge.
The market is church, it's blasphemy to intervene into it divine matter.


Last edited by elisto on 1 October 2019 at 3:18 pm UTC
jasonm 1 Oct, 2019
If you don't want to gamble to get something good just go to the market and buy the item you're after. This crap isn't going to bring anything good for us.
Mal 1 Oct, 2019
Well... this way of thinking is typically american. Europeans have less issues with regulations. Personally it's a matter of finding the sweet spot. Regulations can kill or greatly hurt new, small, immature markets. That's one of the reasons America always come first with new economies. Land of opportunity indeed. But there is a clear point when companies are not small or frail anymore, they become giants in mature markets. And accumulate to much power compared to consumers and citizens in general, making exploitation possible. Once one turns to the dark side, the others have to follow for survival, since free market by design does not forgive companies that spit on easy revenues. That's when regulations is needed, to protect the weak by increasing the costs of actions that hurts the community. And imho Europe usually gets this last part better. Quality of life for everyone.

It might be that I'm European but imho gaming industry is mature enough to deserve some good regulation. Whaling is abusive practice. It's immoral and exploitative. It leverages natural weaknesses in people minds and as such it should be, if not forbidden outright, at least confined in protected spaces away from the reach of the weak. Valve, Epic, Microsoft, Nintendo, 2K, Activision and whatever else cursed gaming giant in mobile will perfectly survive and thrive in profits without that dirty money ripped off the hands of clueless childrens and gambit addicts. And if some small f2p indie has to disappear in the process, good riddance. Their space will be filled by non f2p indies.
Dedale 1 Oct, 2019
That is IF you want to protect the weak. And that's a big if. Not that i disagree with the post above.
Kimyrielle 1 Oct, 2019
jasonmIf you don't want to gamble to get something good just go to the market and buy the item you're after.

You do realize that the overwhelming majority of these lootbox-driven games makes these desirable items available ONLY through gambling, yes?
Samsai 1 Oct, 2019
Not very cool, Valve. Lootboxes and microtransactions are harmful and manipulative anti-features and this whole X-ray thing to me just seems like Valve will put in the least possible effort into addressing any of it.

I, for one, am hoping that more regulation on this front is put in place. I'd much rather games companies like Valve had to compete by making better games at better price points, rather than by coming up with the next psychological trick to pull in order to fleece customers.
orochi_kyo 1 Oct, 2019
HoriDon't they make enough money already? Is it really worth tarnishing they reputation by looking like hungry rats, for a little more money?

I really hope the EU will adopt laws soon to categorise lootboxes and similar practices and gambling, and tax all transactions accordingly.

You didnt read the article right? it is just about talking shit about companies, "look how cool I am".
Free games needs monetization to keep running, you cant keep a game alive just by love, this was done just to adapt to ridiculous laws on France. In Japan nobody cant profit beyond 50.000 dollars participating in gaming tournaments because "its gambling" according to Japan law, maybe some people thinks that those "greedy bastards" who practice many hours a week to stay in competitive level deserve such a stupid law.

If people doesnt like lootboxes, dont buy or play games that use loot boxes, this is not a sensitive sector like health, communications or education, this is gaming and people doesnt need to play these "loot boxes videogames" to have a dignified life.

If gaming industry needs regulation is the labor part with many people working a lot of time with ridiculous timelines to finish the job, but no politician is doing anything for it, they just want tax shit to keep stealing public funds.
orochi_kyo 1 Oct, 2019
KimyrielleI have NO idea why people in this time and age still believe in the "free markets will solve it all" paradigm, when it clearly doesn't and all it has ever done was creating a small group of people having obscene power and even more obscene wealth, while the large rest works double-income and double-jobs and STILL struggle to pay their bills.


Cant be more agree, if people still believe in non-regulated markets, it is because they are doing fine and they think if anyone isnt doing fine as them is because they dont make enough effort.


Last edited by orochi_kyo on 1 October 2019 at 4:55 pm UTC
x_wing 1 Oct, 2019
orochi_kyoIf people doesnt like lootboxes, dont buy or play games that use loot boxes, this is not a sensitive sector like health, communications or education, this is gaming and people doesnt need to play these "loot boxes videogames" to have a dignified life.

Following your reasoning here, we should remove gambling laws all together, don't we? I mean, nobody is forced to go to the casino and gamble.

My only doubt with collective items (such as the FUT cards) is when I compare them with the physical trading card market. My question here is: Should we enforce stricter rules on this items or we must set the same as the physical ones?


Last edited by x_wing on 1 October 2019 at 6:31 pm UTC
Samsai 1 Oct, 2019
x_wing
orochi_kyoIf people doesnt like lootboxes, dont buy or play games that use loot boxes, this is not a sensitive sector like health, communications or education, this is gaming and people doesnt need to play these "loot boxes videogames" to have a dignified life.

Following your reasoning here, we should remove gambling laws all together, don't we? I mean, nobody is forced to go to the casino and gamble.

My only doubt with collective items (such as the FUT cards) is when I compare them with the physical trading card market. My question here is: Should we enforce stricter rules on this items or we must set the same as the physical ones?
My view is that we may as well regulate physical collectible cards and such. I don't see a benefit in such things being sold as black boxes either. The thrill aspect of opening them is practically the same as with in-game lootboxes, the harmful effects are merely mitigated by the fact you need to go more out of your way to purchase them (going to a store versus clicking a button in a game you are already playing). So, IMO, better either sell them in packages that label the contents or as individual items.
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on Patreon, Liberapay or Paypal. We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!

You need to Register and Login to comment, submit articles and more.


Or login with...