Support us on Patreon to keep GamingOnLinux alive. This ensures all of our main content remains free for everyone with no article paywalls. Just good, fresh content! Alternatively, you can donate through PayPal, Liberapay or Buy us a Coffee. You can also buy games using our partner links for GOG and Humble Store.

In Type Knight, you fight skeletons, bats, wraiths and more via the awesome power of your rapid (and hopefully accurate) typing.

Note: Key provided by the developer.

Released last month, Type Knight appears to be the first game by this developer and took around 18 months to deliver the final version on Steam after several demos on Itch.

As the titular "Type Knight", you automatically walk through the graveyard while enemies approach from the right of the screen with words above their heads - type that word and your character delivers an oddly satisfying swipe of his sword to decimate them.

The game is split into sections, starting with two waves of skeletons, but rapidly adding bats, wraiths and finally a boss fight.

YouTube Thumbnail
YouTube videos require cookies, you must accept their cookies to view. View cookie preferences.
Accept Cookies & Show   Direct Link

There are some really nice touches in this little gem. While retro, the graphics are quite pretty with parallax scrolling and some random weather effects. Animation is basic, but as I previously mentioned, also quite satisfying.

There are a few things I don't like, although at this price, that's to be expected. The game will only run in a window, and only in a 4:3 scale, which feels a little odd on today's widescreen monitors. I should also point out that while I've tagged it "educational", the game is quite unforgiving - I touch type at around 45 words per minute and I struggled to get past the first boss on the lowest skill level. The problem is that there's not much wiggle room for error. If you fail on a skeleton, you can become quickly mired by a second skeleton as you correct your first mistake. This is compounded by a lack of a "start word again" mechanic: you have to backspace your error as you would normally... meanwhile, bats might be swarming, and a wraith might also be asking for a defensive "red" word to be completed or you'll take even more damage!

Luckily, the game does offer one power up as you play - you get to assign a word to that power up and then you have three uses - type the word to defeat everything on the screen! Personally I'm fond of assigning "boom", but "help" works quite well, as does "wuss" and "argh". I'm reasonably certain that other four-letter words might also work pretty well!

The game also offers the ability to import your own word dictionary and play with that. You can even restrict certain characters from appearing at all. Finally, you can optionally play that new dictionary in classic mode, or in sequence.

This charming little game isn't going to change the world, but at £2.89/$3.99, Type Knight will while away an hour or two and who knows, maybe you'll become a faster typist as a result.

You can pick it up on Itch, or Steam.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
8 Likes , Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG and Humble Store. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I'm a Scottish Ubuntu user since 2006 and an Ubuntu-only gamer since 2013. I used to contribute to GOL's Funding Crowd articles, but now contribute the odd article directly, most recently the Play It Now series.

I also dabble a bit in Python, I do Internet Security for a living and finally, I'm a big fan of Neil Degrasse Tyson. And not just because he has a cool first name.
See more from me
The comments on this article are closed.
13 comments
Page: «2/2
  Go to:

scaine 26 Nov, 2019
View PC info
  • Contributing Editor
  • Supporter Plus
I loved Transistor's version of "easy" mode. The base game is played evenly for a while, but you quickly accrue optional "Limiters" which change your, or your enemies capabilities, making each encounter harder. The flipside was that each Limiter added to the experience you accrue from each encounter, so playing a harder battle reaped slightly better rewards overall. You were in control at all times, and it felt seamless, because the Limiters were placed like Functions, so you didn't have to escape out to a control panel and change a slider from "normal" to "easy" - it was all done in context to the main game.
Purple Library Guy 26 Nov, 2019
Quoting: scaineI loved Transistor's version of "easy" mode. The base game is played evenly for a while, but you quickly accrue optional "Limiters" which change your, or your enemies capabilities, making each encounter harder. The flipside was that each Limiter added to the experience you accrue from each encounter, so playing a harder battle reaped slightly better rewards overall. You were in control at all times, and it felt seamless, because the Limiters were placed like Functions, so you didn't have to escape out to a control panel and change a slider from "normal" to "easy" - it was all done in context to the main game.
Yeah, that was cool. And it was a fairly solid menu of limiters--some of them were like "Sure, I can totally handle that" and others I was thinking "Somewhere, there is a person who can handle this, but that person is definitely not me."
Nezchan 27 Nov, 2019
Quoting: scaineI loved Transistor's version of "easy" mode. The base game is played evenly for a while, but you quickly accrue optional "Limiters" which change your, or your enemies capabilities, making each encounter harder. The flipside was that each Limiter added to the experience you accrue from each encounter, so playing a harder battle reaped slightly better rewards overall. You were in control at all times, and it felt seamless, because the Limiters were placed like Functions, so you didn't have to escape out to a control panel and change a slider from "normal" to "easy" - it was all done in context to the main game.

To be fair, given the setting, going to a menu to make changes is in context for CrossCode.
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Patreon, Liberapay or PayPal Donation.

We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
The comments on this article are closed.
Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams
Latest Forum Posts