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Not Linux gaming related, sure but still very interesting news. During their Ignite conference, Microsoft confirmed their new Chromium-based Edge browser will release for Linux.

The new Edge will release in full on January 15 next year, although it's not currently known when the Linux version will land. It's not just going to be using Chromium behind the scenes though, Microsoft are actively contributing to the open source code. This was talked about during their recent "State of the browser: Microsoft Edge" presentation.


Image Source: Microsoft.

During the presentation when the slide above was on-screen, Microsoft's Colleen Williams simply said "[…] and Linux is coming at a later time." towards the end of the slide. Hilariously, if you turn your volume up you can hear a single "woo!" from someone in the crowd. You can watch the event yourself here. Linux is mentioned at 08:34.

Microsoft also confirmed during the presentation that the new Edge will be compatible with Chrome extensions, with most being able to work without any change. It will also include a web-based cross-platform store, so it won't be tied to Windows.

I think it's good that Microsoft is moving towards open source software, rather than sticking to their own proprietary projects. Enabling users to have their favourite applications on Linux breaks down another barrier to entry, which is a really important point. I know, I know, Edge is not exactly one of those big favourite applications (yet). My wider point here is that change can be difficult for anyone, even a small change, so if you can keep a few things the same it makes it easier. We all know someone, or we've seen it mentioned somewhere about x application not being available on Linux.

Options are good. Microsoft being more open is great. Hopefully this keeps up, could you imagine if they fully opened up something like DirectX/Direct3D in future and made it cross-platform or they slowly dropped it in favour of an open standard like they're doing here with Edge? Certainly would be interesting.

What do you think? Will you try it? Unleash your mind in the comments.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Apps, Misc
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68 comments
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KuJo 6 Nov, 2019
:O Hell is freezing over more and more ...
Hopfenmeister 6 Nov, 2019
QuoteOptions are good.

That's why I'm a bit worried that the alternative render engines are slowly dying out and everything is becoming re-skinned Chromium. It already feels like there's an increasing number of web sites that don't really work well in Firefox any more because developers go into production as soon as it works on Chrome. We might be headed back to the times when "Works best in Netscape Navigator" (or whatever) logos were everywhere.
Pangaea 6 Nov, 2019
Don't want to install spyware, so I'll stick with Firefox thank you. Same goes for the various Google browsers and "services".
slaapliedje 6 Nov, 2019
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Some sites literally work in Chrome and not Firefox because Firefox refuses to work with broken ciphers that Chrome only silently complains about. To the point that Chrome moved it under having to open the developer tools, and go under the security audit tab to find that the page is using an obsolete cipher.
So yeah, screw Chrome! I still have never seen the draw for it. Always seemed a conflict of interest to me to have a browser controlled by someone who also owns a search engine.
Firefox and DuckDuckGo for me.
tonR 6 Nov, 2019
QuoteI think it's good that Microsoft is moving towards open source software, rather than sticking to their own proprietary projects.

Well, If (and really if) MS really want to show their love towards Linux, they should start by open sourced and/or port Internet Explorer to Linux.

Why? Simple, opening up their own proprietary IP (even obselete one) is the simple but effective way to prove that they're really committed towards FOSS.

You cannot just taking everything without giving up something.
pete910 6 Nov, 2019
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Quoting: tonR
QuoteI think it's good that Microsoft is moving towards open source software, rather than sticking to their own proprietary projects.

Well, If (and really if) MS really want to show their love towards Linux, they should start by open sourced and/or port Internet Explorer to Linux.

Why? Simple, opening up their own proprietary IP (even obselete one) is the simple but effective way to prove that they're really committed towards FOSS.

You cannot just taking everything without giving up something.

They probably don't want to do that as they may get laughed/ridiculed for the state of it :D
Nevertheless 6 Nov, 2019
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I think Microsoft loves Linux the same way fur coat wearers love fur animals.


Last edited by Nevertheless on 6 November 2019 at 5:17 pm UTC
hagabaka 7 Nov, 2019
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As a web developer, I wish Microsoft had changed Internet Explorer to be powered by Chromium/Blink instead. It really sucks not being able to use new web features supported by most of the commonly used browsers, because IE doesn't support them.

Edge's standard compliance was far from perfect, but it was much better than IE. So the replacement of Edge's engine with Blink was actually a loss of options. We went from having 3 major modern web engines to 2. And it doesn't seem like Edge itself will be open source (otherwise, they could just say they would open source Edge, rather than "Microsoft Edge + open source"), so whatever differentiates it from the many other Blink-powered browsers will still be proprietary.


Last edited by hagabaka on 7 November 2019 at 8:19 am UTC
elmapul 7 Nov, 2019
looks like the era of "apps co" and "ops co" finally has come
slaapliedje 7 Nov, 2019
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Quoting: NeverthelessI think Microsoft loves Linux the same way fur coat wearers love fur animals.
They do tend to wear it, rather than use it. Going with that analogy, if they killed the fur animal themselves, and then skinned it for it's coat, but also properly tried to use the rest of it for food, etc, then due to the GPL, they'd also have to share the food, and the coat.

I wonder if there will come a day when Linux, due to it's huge flexibility and being able to at times run Windows software better than Windows (like older stuff that is no longer compatible to Windows 10, even with it's compatibility layer), that MS will simply throw in a Linux Kernel with Xorg and Wine to get the backward compatibility better.

Hell, let's just replace all of Win10 with Linux, and use compatibility layer, then they can port over some native stuff too. But then where will the telemetry and ads go?? :P
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