Support us on Patreon to keep GamingOnLinux alive. This ensures all of our main content remains free for everyone with no article paywalls. Just good, fresh content! Alternatively, you can donate through PayPal, Liberapay or Buy us a Coffee. You can also buy games using our partner links for GOG and Humble Store.

UnCiv, a free and open source remake of Civilization V

By - | Views: 87,223

What do you do when you want to keep the mechanics of a game you love alive? If you're developer Yair Morgenstern, you remake it yourself like they did with UnCiv.

A remake of Civilization V, although it looks nothing alike as it's gone for a much more retro pixel-art like style it's supposed to follow the same game mechanics. Much like the classic Freeciv which is based on earlier rules and features.

Available for both Android and PC, you can clearly see with it needing a few adjustments to look good on PC. Only in the last few months has the developer actually started bundling PC release files with it, so hopefully if it becomes a bit more popular and/or pulls in some help, it can get an improved flow for PC players. Playable though and always fun to see more open source strategy games appear.

They do have a lot of plans for the project including user interface improvements, city-state quests, adding in missing civilizations, religion, trade routes and so on.

You can find it on GitHub.

Hat tip to RTheren.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
14 Likes
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG and Humble Store. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
The comments on this article are closed.
43 comments
Page: «5/5
  Go to:

Pangaea 12 Jan, 2020
Ultimately it's simply down to a difference in opinion with regards to the combat in Civ 4 and 5/6. What I enjoy most about Civ 4 is the depth, balance and how hard it is on the higher difficulties. For me, it simply was a whole ton more fun to play than Civ 5. And since I've played it competitively, such things matter too. Winning on Deity and even Immortal is far from trivial in Civ 4, which means the game has been fun to play for me for years on end. For others it can be different of course.

:)
Nevertheless 12 Jan, 2020
Quoting: PangaeaUltimately it's simply down to a difference in opinion with regards to the combat in Civ 4 and 5/6. What I enjoy most about Civ 4 is the depth, balance and how hard it is on the higher difficulties. For me, it simply was a whole ton more fun to play than Civ 5. And since I've played it competitively, such things matter too. Winning on Deity and even Immortal is far from trivial in Civ 4, which means the game has been fun to play for me for years on end. For others it can be different of course.

:)

I played a lot of Civ in my life, mostly single player, or on lan, never on the internet. I almost always played as peacefully and even separated from AI civs as possible, always looking for science victory, because I was never able to connect to religions in Civ (used it for happyness mainly where this applied), and I also never liked the united nations systems too much, where they seemed to decide that you lose or win "the game" some sunny day...
My problem right now is to keep my experiences from 4 and 5 separated. It's been years since I played "Beyond The Sword". I remember loving the introduction of hex tiles, and the end of deathstacks in Civ5.
Civ5 was something that I seemed to be unable to control as much as I wanted. I had the impression that I had to decide too early for a specific philosophy of play, that I had to specialize too much..
Now with Civ 6 (having 2 expansions, and knowing a lot more of the game), I fell in love with Civ again. The systems seem clever and transparent to me. I can (and have to to be efficient) plan my cities districts to an extent, that has never been there in any civ game. Tile improvement in the early ones was made out of muscle memory, the it became more complex, but still based on maxing out the improvements you have decided for. Now it's planning what and where, and that even with regards to neighbour cities.
Of course it's not a perfect game. There are things to unlike. But I don't regard it as dumbed down.
To back my impressions up (or throw them out the window), and fueled by the comments in this thread, I decided to revisit Civ4 and 5 in the near future.


Last edited by Nevertheless on 12 January 2020 at 12:25 pm UTC
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Reward Tiers: Patreon. Plain Donations: Liberapay or PayPal.

This ensures all of our main content remains totally free for everyone with no article paywalls. We also don't have tons of adverts, there's also no tracking and we respect your privacy. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
The comments on this article are closed.