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The Linux GOTY Award 2019 is now open for voting

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Get ready to cast your votes, as the Linux GOTY Award 2019 is now open for business. After some time to let people nominate games, we've done a bit of cleaning up and it's ready.

This is a simple way to show off to other Linux gamers what's really good, it shows developers their games are appreciated on Linux and it's supposed to be a bit of community fun.

We're going to keep it open for voting for a full week, so you can come back to a category if you can't yet make up your mind. It will close around 8PM UTC on Saturday 8th February.

Head on over to the GOTY Page now to cast your votes.

Notes:

- We removed the "Biggest step up for Linux support" category because it just didn't make sense. No one really understood it.

- Next year it's going to be smaller, simpler and more fun. It's too many categories as it is and it became a nightmare to admin it. We will decide on a few fun categories for next time!

- We know it's 2020, we run it when 2019 is actually finished to be fair to all games.

- Two votes per category - so you can vote for your favourite and then your runner-up.

- You can reset your votes in each category any time before it ends.

- Nothing is perfect, sometimes really good stuff gets missed.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: GOTY
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Beamboom 3 Feb, 2020
Quoting: TheSHEEEPOf which you did not counter a single point, so I am most likely simply right about you.

Again an assumption. You are really eager at judging others, aren't you.
The problem is your attitude, it's not one I care to spend time on. Be a bit more inviting and not so full of attitude and you may establish an interesting conversation. I don't have a single thing against people with different perception on things than me. But I do have a thing against people that respond like you.

And quite frankly you already found the answers in the post you replied to, had you bothered reading it without already having made up your mind about your response.


Last edited by Beamboom on 3 February 2020 at 12:26 pm UTC
Beamboom 3 Feb, 2020
Quoting: GuestSeriously, can you name 5 quality AAA games released in 2019 that you "can't live without" and are not playable using WINE? I can't.

I agree! At least if we now only talk single player games.
Generally speaking I don't find many games worth playing each year. But then again - I don't need to when one game alone represent potentially hundreds of hours gaming time.

Quoting: GuestThis year? What are the really cool AAA games we need? Well, there is Cyberpunk 2070 (the main reason i am keeping the Windows 10 partition), what else?

For me maybe the most anticipated game this year is Vampire Bloodlines. That game, if done right, has huge potential of being a GOTY this year. And the ingame videos so far are really¸really promising. It's SO great getting an action RPG that's not a cookie-cutter fantasy setting. Gothic modern day urban vampires... I mean how can that not be cool :)

And yeah Cyberpunk is of course practically guaranteed to be epic.

Quoting: GuestWitcher 3, Fallout 4, Skyrim SE, Deus Ex MD, the Tomb Raiders, the Far Cries, Grand theft Auto V, Red Dead Redemption 2 and a few more. Some of them are native on Linux or playable under Wine+DXVK/Proton.

Indeed. And that is also why I said that I am happy we got Steam Play. :)


Last edited by Beamboom on 3 February 2020 at 2:51 pm UTC
TheSHEEEP 3 Feb, 2020
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Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: TheSHEEEPOf which you did not counter a single point, so I am most likely simply right about you.

Again an assumption. You are really eager at judging others, aren't you.
An assumption in a sentence with "most likely"? Why yes, yes it is!
And one you continue to reinforce by evading all points made.
I am not one of those people who pretend judging others would be something bad. All of us judge everyone else (and ourselves) all the time, we do it since we walk around on this dirt heap. I'm merely as open about that as I am about anything else and do not care for initial handshaking to get a discussion started.

Quoting: BeamboomThe problem is your attitude, it's not one I care to spend time on. Be a bit more inviting and not so full of attitude and you may establish an interesting conversation. I don't have a single thing against people with different perception on things than me. But I do have a thing against people that respond like you.
I have no interest in being inviting. My interest lies in speaking my mostly unfiltered mind and receiving an equal response.
Take it or leave it, but know that leaving it will only reinforce my "assumptions" about you - not that I could give you any real reason why you should even care about what a random online person thinks about you.


Last edited by TheSHEEEP on 3 February 2020 at 12:40 pm UTC
mirv 3 Feb, 2020
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Don't suppose we can stop the grumbling at each other and move more back into discussion territory?

"AAA" gaming is important to some people. It's not to others. There is pretty much every gradient of grey in between. And I'm sure we can all respect and appreciate that.

My own view of course is that I think more people should try spend extra time on indie gaming, just to expand their experience. That's just a generalised statement, I don't mean anyone in particular. I mean, maybe people do and I don't see it because of "AAA" marketing machines, which is why I'm honestly a little happy that GNU/Linux desktop isn't flooded with such things.
And yes, I do appreciate the odd "AAA" of course, such as the Tomb Raider series. I just mean that since fully switching to GNU/Linux I've discovered far more entertaining games that I might not have even tried back in my Windows days.

I'm also slightly disquieted by people's reliance on "Steam Play". Some may roll their eyes at me saying this again (fair enough), but I get this feeling that many don't see a difference between GNU/Linux, and Steam. Personally (only) I don't see this as a good sign, given my own reasons for using GNU/Linux. If there was a flood of "AAA", and everything gets locked down and effectively controlled by Valve, that's not good - no matter how nice Valve are playing, it's not a good situation. Indie games typically are available elsewhere, have less reliance on a (proprietary) third party client, and are generally more embracing of the openess that characterises GNU/Linux.

Yeah I know that's not everyone's view, which is actually a good thing - allowing all these different views is again just another facet of an open system, and something to be celebrated. So long as the ability to game on GNU/Linux is not locked down, and never needs you to release control of your own system to someone else.

.....go, debate!
Beamboom 3 Feb, 2020
Quoting: TheSHEEEPTake it or leave it, but know that leaving it will only reinforce my "assumptions" about you - not that I could give you any real reason why you should even care about what a random online person thinks about you.

Like I said, you have your answers to that in the first post you replied to. There is no reason for me to repeat that.
Beamboom 3 Feb, 2020
Quoting: mirvDon't suppose we can stop the grumbling at each other and move more back into discussion territory?

Good suggestion.

Quoting: mirvMy own view of course is that I think more people should try spend extra time on indie gaming, just to expand their experience.

That (imo of course) is actually the only solid argument *for* our lack of "headliner" games. There are indeed games I discovered "out of boredom" in the period before Steam Play were launched. But I hate to admit it (seriously, I do), while entertained I was only so for a relatively short period of time. There was too much lacking for me to really find them to be worth extended investment of time.

And it wasn't only because they were too small/basic/retro (pick your adjective :) ). I miss the layer of polish that high budget games have. They are simply more professionally made, created by experienced designers and it obviously makes a difference.

And no, I do not now talk about graphics (in fact there's plenty indie games with great visuals - I'm not one that demand "realistic" graphics at all, and rate artistic style much higher than the number of polygons or the visual effects).
No, the polish I talk about is on all the other things. The hundreds of little components that makes out a game. Everything from an intuitive interface to a well thought out tutorial to fluid mechanics, responsiveness, camera control, map design, every other little thing that isolated doesn't mean all, but each on their own adds up.

And THEN, on top of THAT, we can start talking about content: Voice acting, scripting, story line, animations, cut scenes, visuals, audio, network play, size of player base (in multi-player), freedom of movement, character creation, etc.

And the closer we conceptually get to the big budget games I love, the more the indies falls behind. With today's engines "anyone" can make a sleek twin stick shooter. But if you seek open worlds to explore, then the indie scene don't have much to offer at all. We got 7 Days 2 Die (who is a great game by the way). But that's about it.

There's a reason why those games are built by the large developers. It takes a hell of a lot of manpower to create something adequate. Again, not just in regards to graphics, but in regards to sheer content. Map design. Story lines. Assets. Scripting. Mechanics. It's a massive endeavour.

There are some attempts at this from small developers - and I believe I own a good share of them (Planet Explorers springs to mind as a hugely ambitious example) - but I am sorry to say they all fell short. Some adorable attempts, especially when we talk about a team of 2-3 guys or even solo projects - and I can totally see what they try to do, but it just doesn't cut it. It's too big of a task.

(btw: When I talk about "AAA" I don't mean the strict meaning of only games from devs owned by the big distributors. From that definition CD Project Red was an indie. Obsidian would be an indie. I essentially talk about the games created by larger developers, backed by high budgets.)


Last edited by Beamboom on 3 February 2020 at 9:13 pm UTC
scaine 3 Feb, 2020
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Funnily enough, I get Beamboom's point about AAA not just being graphics. That's spot on. For me though, what make's a game "AAA" is many things, but often (for me, as I say), hinges upon good acting. Voice acting, or movements in game. Not many indies get this right.

Some do though. Games like Mark of the Ninja, or An Elysian Tale have this in spades, but are from small outfits. Similarly, the Windows-only games from Spearhead Studios are indie but have IMMENSE story telling, voice acting, movement and polish - both Stories: Path of Destiny and the "sequel" (it's not really) Omensight are just amazing because of this, but of course, they'll never get true "AAA" categorisation. Both play near-perfectly in SteamPlay btw - the former is platinum, the latter should be platinum, but needs the media foundations installed to play the tutorial thumbnail videos sadly. It's a 20 second fix to install it, but pretty infuriating that Spearhead adopted such a shitty technology... for a sequel!! Both are still well worth playing though.
14 3 Feb, 2020
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Wow, Favourite long-term supported game is a hard category to pick!
Smoke39 3 Feb, 2020
Quoting: BeamboomI miss the layer of polish that high budget games have. They are simply more professionally made, created by experienced designers and it obviously makes a difference.

And no, I do not now talk about graphics (in fact there's plenty indie games with great visuals - I'm not one that demand "realistic" graphics at all, and rate artistic style much higher than the number of polygons or the visual effects).
No, the polish I talk about is on all the other things. The hundreds of little components that makes out a game. Everything from an intuitive interface to a well thought out tutorial to fluid mechanics, responsiveness, camera control, map design, every other little thing that isolated doesn't mean all, but each on their own adds up.
This is just straight up bullshit, and disrespectful of the skill demonstrated by some indies. Just because a game has a larger budget doesn't make it more "professional" or more polished.

As a random example off the top of my head: Shovel Knight. Anyone can cobble together a basic 2D platformer, but designing a game of Shovel Knight's quality takes genuine skill. Coming up with novel obstacles that one might take for granted as a player is not easy, nor is designing levels that are challenging but fair. It takes real creativity, and real design skill.

I would argue that Shovel Knight is actually better than a lot of the games that inspired it, and that's because Yacht Club didn't just haphazardly throw down tiles or blindly mimic what came before. They're not just quaint hobbyists dicking around. They're skilled professionals with a deep understanding of game design, who applied that knowledge to create a product that was highly polished.

It's fine if games like Shovel Knight don't interest you, but it is undeniably exceptionally well-crafted, and just as "professional" and polished as any AAA game.

Quoting: BeamboomAnd THEN, on top of THAT, we can start talking about content: Voice acting, scripting, story line, animations, cut scenes, visuals, audio, network play, size of player base (in multi-player), freedom of movement, character creation, etc.
You said your issue wasn't with indies being "too small/basic," but you're talking about scope here. And again, it's totally fine if you prefer games with more to them. But just because a game has a larger scope doesn't mean it's better, or more professional, or more polished. It just means it's bigger.
Beamboom 4 Feb, 2020
Quoting: Smoke39This is just straight up bullshit, and disrespectful of the skill demonstrated by some indies. [...]As a random example off the top of my head: Shovel Knight.

(my bolds)

Sigh. I had a feeling this would come. I was about to write one more disclaimer but felt I'd written a long enough post as it were. But here goes:

I am obviously now talking about the big picture. The general situation. There's always exceptions, the world is not black/white.
It's very easy to come up with examples of small games that does a particular thing well. There's also plenty, plenty!, examples of big budget productions gone horribly wrong on pretty much every single aspect of the game. Oh good grief, the examples stand in line.

It's also quite symptomatic that an indie game does some parts well, but are very weak on others. A direct consequence of being so few on the project. But the small scope concepts, like puzzlers, platformers, are often done well. Perfect genre for a small developer to create.
And you got the ultra rare exceptions that turns out to be pure pieces of interactive art. Like Flower from Thatgamecompany. But those are few and far between.

I purchased The Pedestrian yesterday. A real charmer of a game. Excellent visual idea. Smooth execution. Will be fun for an hour or two. All good. But at the core of this game lies a very small scope. It's just another small puzzler. It just looks really good.

Generally speaking, the tendency is that the bigger the scope of the game is the harder the small developers will fail. Because, at the end of the day a large scale game totally depends on having enough competence and manpower behind it.
And that, inevitably, costs.

But yes, of course there exist small games that does what it does well. I mean... Come on.


Last edited by Beamboom on 4 February 2020 at 11:27 am UTC
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