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The Linux GOTY Award 2019 is now open for voting

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Get ready to cast your votes, as the Linux GOTY Award 2019 is now open for business. After some time to let people nominate games, we've done a bit of cleaning up and it's ready.

This is a simple way to show off to other Linux gamers what's really good, it shows developers their games are appreciated on Linux and it's supposed to be a bit of community fun.

We're going to keep it open for voting for a full week, so you can come back to a category if you can't yet make up your mind. It will close around 8PM UTC on Saturday 8th February.

Head on over to the GOTY Page now to cast your votes.

Notes:

- We removed the "Biggest step up for Linux support" category because it just didn't make sense. No one really understood it.

- Next year it's going to be smaller, simpler and more fun. It's too many categories as it is and it became a nightmare to admin it. We will decide on a few fun categories for next time!

- We know it's 2020, we run it when 2019 is actually finished to be fair to all games.

- Two votes per category - so you can vote for your favourite and then your runner-up.

- You can reset your votes in each category any time before it ends.

- Nothing is perfect, sometimes really good stuff gets missed.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: GOTY
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54 comments
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TheSHEEEP 4 Feb, 2020
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I think it is fair to say that in general, the majority of games are not well done.
No matter what industry or kind of skill you talk about, people who are truly good at what they do, the top of the class if you will, are in the minority. Thus, it is only natural that the majority of products in any sector is not good - while the few that are good crystallize and become apparent over time.

The thing is just that there are a lot more indie than AAA games, and with that naturally also comes a larger number of good indie games compared to very few good AAA games.

AAA games have the advantage of being shiny on the surface level - and many players rarely look further than the surface when it comes to games.

I'd compare it to cinema - are all the movies that are most successful also the best movies? Certainly not.
They are just good popcorn cinema. Won't demand much from your audience, will show quite a spectacle on the screen, people leave with a good feeling (well, if the movie wasn't downright terrible) while not really being richer in any meaningful way and having no thought provoked.
Truly great movies rarely achieve a high level of success, even though some certainly do, often over time.

I don't think there's anything wrong with popcorn cinema, and I'm definitely mostly a popcorn cinema viewer.
My standards when it comes to cinema or movies in general are a lot lower than when it comes to games.
But I'd never even get the idea of saying that large scale cinema movies are better than their lower-budget counterparts in any way other than surface-level bling.
Quite the opposite, actually. In true artistic value, not a single movie by Marvel comes close to anything put out by Von Trier, for example. I watched Antichrist once and it still finds its way into my thoughts every now and then - that sure won't happen with a Marvel movie.

It is very, very similar with gaming.
Just that indie games are a lot easier to access and consume than indie movies and therefore can find a potential audience more easily.

Quoting: BeamboomIt's also quite symptomatic that an indie game does some parts well, but are very weak on others. A direct consequence of being so few on the project.
The parts that indie games do well are the parts most important to any game, those related to gameplay, to whatever the core of the game is.

The parts that they don't usually do well in are art and, to some degree, audio. And I'm not talking about high-end effects or models here, those have nothing to do with art quality. What's important about quality game art is its consistency and (usually) variance. That's where many indies fail to various degrees, and not always because of budget.

Just to make it clear, I'm talking about good indie games here; that bad ones fail at what they do is kind of a given.

AAA on the other hand focuses on high-end art and audio - because that's what will rake the cash in big time, with the casual audience. While gameplay, if things went well, is serviceable at best. Which is kind of funny, because great gameplay can be achieved by very few people and is thus actually much cheaper than high-end art which requires lots of manpower.
A AAA game that is also truly good or even great in gameplay and not just a boring rehash of things devoid of challenge and creativity?
Dark Souls comes to mind. I'm struggling to name more.


Last edited by TheSHEEEP on 4 February 2020 at 12:58 pm UTC
TheSHEEEP 5 Feb, 2020
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Quoting: PatolaIt's not a method to lull our brain to sleep. Is to make things believable. Ever heard of suspension of disbelief?
Absolutely.
And there is absolutely no problem in suspending my disbelief if the graphics are consistent and well implemented. If they are realistic or not is rather irrelevant.
Because I'm actually using my imagination. Not actively, mind you, like most things mind-related, it happens "in the background".

Quoting: Patola
Quoting: TheSHEEEPIf you want to lull your brain to sleep with AAA graphics - because that is exactly what happens, your brain got nothing to do there as it doesn't need to fill any blanks, the more realistic the graphics get - well, that's your choice.
So, making the brain tired with artificial, non-believable graphics is something you enjoy? Curious. I'd think they get in the way of enjoyment, not somehow improve it.
You're not painting a very optimistic picture of your brain if a bit of imagination is already tiring it.
The brain is like a muscle, excercise it. It is not too late (assuming you are not 60-70+ and the cells are actually decaying).

I continually use it from working to learning a language to playing games that require actual thought and imagination - and I'm not having tiredness problems with any of it.
Of course I rest it, too. Rest is important. I usually do it before going to bed, helps with sleeping.

Quoting: Patolabecause you are not even first-person (except for Hardcore Henry, a truly amazing flick).
I see a pattern forming here.
First person makes immersion a lot easier, no doubt about it.
But it isn't the only thing allowing it, it can be done with pretty much any perspective.

Though I do agree that was maybe not the best example. Series and movies are almost exclusive watching someone else do stuff, you are not the protagonist.

Quoting: PatolaSimple graphics .... They instead offer you a simplified, flat version of what you would be supposedly interacting with -- a token of an entity, and not by any means an attempt at a convincing exposition.
Exactly. And everything they do not show you, every thing lacking to complete the "picture" and form a non-flat version of what you are seeing, all of that is done by your imagination.

Quoting: PatolaAt no time you have to really imagine something, but if you really had -- like in those games made for blind people, with sounds alone, where you have to use the imagination all the time -- it would likely be a bad, tiresome game, at some point you would really demand to see the monster, or whatever that is it should offer.
So you acknowledge that your brain goes active if it is presented with a lack of information.
Good, that is correct. That's how brains work, filling the gaps and completing patterns is what we're really good at. Especially if trained correctly.
But retro graphics are full of a lack of information. The only difference between something like an audio-only game and something with a simple graphical style is the amount of information lacking.
Your brain doesn't care, it becomes active either way, the only difference is in how active it has to become.

You don't have to take my word for it. I would seriously recommend reading some books about how brains work, or at least what we know so far.
We got recommended these two in a completely random course at my "vocational school" (not sure what the correct translation would be) years ago, or at least older printing of these:
https://www.amazon.com/Creating-Mind-How-Brain-Works/dp/0393974464
https://www.amazon.com/Imagination-Understanding-Minds-Greatest-Power/dp/1643132032

Though I didn't finish the latter, to be honest, it was a bit "out there" with its excourses into psychology.
Edit: The latter one says it was released in 2019. Uhm... I'm either mixing it up with another one with a similar name or they got the dates wrong.


Last edited by TheSHEEEP on 5 February 2020 at 6:55 am UTC
scaine 8 years 5 Feb, 2020
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I can see both sides of the discussion here. But honestly, you're both arguing from extremes. There's no way that TheSheeeep could defend the appalling, muddy, messy graphics of something like Teleglitch (despite its fun gameplay), and meanwhile Beamboom has already admitted that there are plenty of indies that have coherent, absorbing worlds.

And reading a book on how the brain works isn't going to change that. Teleglitch could have been amazing. Instead it was headache inducing (when you die, it tells you what enemies you killed and I was surprised to discover that I'd killed four different types of zombie... they were all indinstinguisable blobs). Drake 4 could have been a stunning, memorable, interactive movie, and instead it was simply dull and reinforced the limits of its gameplay over and over (you can climb up THIS WALL, but definitely not THIS WALL).

Counterpoint to Teleglitch? Noita (windows-only). Or Chasm (linux native).
Counterpoint to Drake 4? The Last of Us (PS4), Witcher 3 (windows-only), or for linux-native, look no further than the Life is Strange series, or the latest Tomb Raider.


Last edited by scaine on 5 February 2020 at 3:53 pm UTC
TheSHEEEP 5 Feb, 2020
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Quoting: scaineThere's no way that TheSheeeep could defend the appalling, muddy, messy graphics of something like Teleglitch (despite its fun gameplay),
While I personally don't like the Teleglitch style, either, from screenshots and gameplay videos, the style seems to be very consistently done and applied throughout the game - nothing seems unfitting or out of place at a first glance.
So I would still say its graphics are well done - if I (or anyone else) personally enjoy them or not doesn't matter in judging their quality.

Don't know if telling different zombie types apart is even relevant in a game like that (it sure wasn't in good old Alien Shooter) - if it was important, then yeah, you would be right about it.


Last edited by TheSHEEEP on 5 February 2020 at 4:39 pm UTC
scaine 8 years 5 Feb, 2020
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Quoting: TheSHEEEPSo I would still say its graphics are well done - if I (or anyone else) personally enjoy them or not doesn't matter in judging their quality.

The graphical effects were well done. But it's a great example of where pixel graphics appear to be more reflection of lack of resources than "artistic style". Because if it were latter, then I don't understand why the game would bother with the distinction between, say, a zombie, and a mutant human.

It did make that distinction, but god knows why. You couldn't actually distinguish between them because the graphics were a pixelly, muddy mess.
WorMzy 6 Feb, 2020
Quoting: Liam Dawe

Unrelated to the on-going discussion, please could the GotY page be added to the Sections dropdown menu at the top of the website? I've seen that there's a notification about it, but it only seems to appear once every three or four page visits, and you can dismiss it, so there isn't an easy, consistent way of getting to the page*.


* You can search for the article and get the link that way, but that only seems to show up in the results if you explicitly search for "GOTY", and I can't seem to add "Game of the Year" or "Awards" to the tags (presumably because they aren't tags you've used before).
Liam Dawe 6 Feb, 2020
Quoting: WorMzy
Quoting: Liam Dawe

Unrelated to the on-going discussion, please could the GotY page be added to the Sections dropdown menu at the top of the website? I've seen that there's a notification about it, but it only seems to appear once every three or four page visits, and you can dismiss it, so there isn't an easy, consistent way of getting to the page*.


* You can search for the article and get the link that way, but that only seems to show up in the results if you explicitly search for "GOTY", and I can't seem to add "Game of the Year" or "Awards" to the tags (presumably because they aren't tags you've used before).
Good idea, how did I miss that. Whenever the page is online (open to the public) the link will now be available there.
WorMzy 6 Feb, 2020
Perfect, thanks!

Might be worth keeping it there for a while after voting closes and winners are announced, so people can get to the results easily.

EDIT: this is probably covered by "open to the public". Ignore my noise. :P


Last edited by WorMzy on 6 February 2020 at 11:36 am UTC
Eike 6 Feb, 2020
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Quoting: Liam DaweGood idea, how did I miss that. Whenever the page is online (open to the public) the link will now be available there.

You could add the deadline to the page.
Liam Dawe 6 Feb, 2020
Quoting: WorMzyPerfect, thanks!

Might be worth keeping it there for a while after voting closes and winners are announced, so people can get to the results easily.

EDIT: this is probably covered by "open to the public". Ignore my noise. :P
Yup, only time we close it down is when clearing it for the next award :)

Quoting: Eike
Quoting: Liam DaweGood idea, how did I miss that. Whenever the page is online (open to the public) the link will now be available there.

You could add the deadline to the page.
Yeah, good idea, done.

I've added a todo item to have that stored in the database so I can have it setup properly and auto-close voting for next time :)
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