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As a nice win for open source, hardware vendor Lenovo are going to begin offering Fedora Linux on their ThinkPad line. This was announced today over on the Fedora Magazine by Red Hat's Matthew Miller.

You will be able to select Fedora Workstation as your operating system when customizing a Lenovo ThinkPad, as part of a pilot in Lenovo’s Linux Community Series. They're going to be starting with the ThinkPad P1 Gen2, ThinkPad P53, and ThinkPad X1 Gen8 laptops and if it's a success likely more. Sounds like it's been a good partnership too, as Miller said Lenovo has been "following our existing trademark guidelines and respects our open source principles" with it shipping exactly as the Fedora team want.

In the post they included this teaser video:

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As Mark Pearson, Sr. Linux Developer, from Lenovo said, "Lenovo is excited to become a part of the Fedora community. We want to ensure an optimal Linux experience on our products. We are committed to working with and learning from the open source community."

This is great, and it's really needed that we have more well-known hardware vendors put Linux as an option (and actually advertise it) for Linux adoption rates to increase. It's one of the biggest barriers.

More details about this will be coming soon closer to launch.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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TheSHEEEP 25 Apr, 2020
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Quoting: Rooster
QuoteOur installer aims to make the complicated process of installing Fedora to replace another operating system as easy as possible, but it’s still a barrier even for tech-literate people

Wait what?
Maybe in the sense of "tech-literate people, too, are lazy".
Just because I could deal with a complicated installation process, doesn't mean I want to.
Rooster 25 Apr, 2020
Quoting: TheSHEEEP
Quoting: Rooster
QuoteOur installer aims to make the complicated process of installing Fedora to replace another operating system as easy as possible, but it’s still a barrier even for tech-literate people

Wait what?
Maybe in the sense of "tech-literate people, too, are lazy".
Just because I could deal with a complicated installation process, doesn't mean I want to.

What I fail to see is, what is complicated about installing Fedora 32? It's about as easy as you can get.
chr 25 Apr, 2020
Quoting: Rooster
Quoting: TheSHEEEP
Quoting: Rooster
QuoteOur installer aims to make the complicated process of installing Fedora to replace another operating system as easy as possible, but it’s still a barrier even for tech-literate people

Wait what?
Maybe in the sense of "tech-literate people, too, are lazy".
Just because I could deal with a complicated installation process, doesn't mean I want to.

What I fail to see is, what is complicated about installing Fedora 32? It's about as easy as you can get.

Another hypothesis: maybe they mean tech-literate people who have never installed an OS? Or Windows-users who would need to research what is swap and how many GiB you need and what file-system is best on SSD. Then again that just sounds like over-optimizing rather than not managing to do it.
Redface 25 Apr, 2020
Quoting: chr
Quoting: Rooster
Quoting: TheSHEEEP
Quoting: Rooster
QuoteOur installer aims to make the complicated process of installing Fedora to replace another operating system as easy as possible, but it’s still a barrier even for tech-literate people

Wait what?
Maybe in the sense of "tech-literate people, too, are lazy".
Just because I could deal with a complicated installation process, doesn't mean I want to.

What I fail to see is, what is complicated about installing Fedora 32? It's about as easy as you can get.

Another hypothesis: maybe they mean tech-literate people who have never installed an OS? Or Windows-users who would need to research what is swap and how many GiB you need and what file-system is best on SSD. Then again that just sounds like over-optimizing rather than not managing to do it.
It is just marketing speak, they are trained to sound good while not making much sense.
Arehandoro 25 Apr, 2020
If they expand it to the T495 model before System76/Purism put Ryzen CPUs in their laptops it might be the perfect fit for my aging x250.

Also, the 3 physical buttons on ThinkPads, I use the middle one heavily, are way better than touchpads only.
pete910 25 Apr, 2020
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Quoting: ShmerlFinally! Until now they even refused to refund the Windows tax. That's a refreshing change. Looking forward for them doing it for all Thinkpads. I'm only buying them with Ryzens these days.

It would be nice if all vendors offered all their ranges of laptops without windows if required.



Quoting: TheSHEEEPWhy Fedora, though?
I mean, nothing against Fedora, but wouldn't Ubuntu generally result in a better experience for users due to more widespread support of pretty much anything?
There's a ton of stuff readily available for Ubuntu (or rather, as .deb) which is not impossible to get on Fedora but you have to jump through some hoops.

Same could be said for Manjaro and the like.

Quoting: tmtvlBut to get anything on Ubuntu you need to add a bunch of PPA's, which is less convenient than using RPM Fusion on Fedora.

Indeed, It's why I chose an Arch based distro tbh.

I've not tried Fedora in a long while, I'm originally a RPM guy myself. Stemming from the Mandrake era back in the day :O

I feel old ......
starfarer 25 Apr, 2020
Pretty cool. Alas my T530 that I bought AGES ago still works like a charm. I remember I had to install Debian testing back in the day to get it working at all.
ProfessorKaos64 25 Apr, 2020
I have a feeling I made the right choice with the Lemur Pro I got a few weeks ago. I like the System 76 approach/support and hardware/OS pairing. However, I recognize may be a good thing for Fedora fans. But Lenovo...
randyl 25 Apr, 2020
Quoting: TheSHEEEPWhy Fedora, though?
I mean, nothing against Fedora, but wouldn't Ubuntu generally result in a better experience for users due to more widespread support of pretty much anything?
There's a ton of stuff readily available for Ubuntu (or rather, as .deb) which is not impossible to get on Fedora but you have to jump through some hoops.
Installing apps and libraries on Fedora is as easy as any other disto. Enabling RPMFusion is like enabling "Universe" on Ubuntu or the AUR on Arch, which isn't complicated at all. It's just a repo. I use it for Nvidia drivers and Steam.

A better user experience is highly subjective. That's why so many distros are represented here. For me, Fedora is a great distro because it's close to upstream so I get a more vanilla experience that lets me customize my desktop how I like. Packages are up to date and fresh, but the system is stable. I use my desktop for work and gaming so it needs to be stable and rock solid that gets out of my way. Since Thinkpads are targeted at power users, Fedora is a good fit for that.

The important point, to me, is that another Linux distribution is being offered as an OS choice by major hardware manufacturers.
fagnerln 25 Apr, 2020
Fedora is a great distro, but the fact that it need to be updated in every release (6 months iirc) it can be a headache for a simple user. Fedora needs a LTS or even a rolling version.
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