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Ah Ubuntu, it's like a warm cuddly blanket or a favourite jumper. There's others in your wardrobe but nothing is quite like the comfy and safe feel of it. A major new version is approaching with Ubuntu 20.04 which is a "Long Term Support" release.

Ubuntu 20.04 and all the flavours like Ubuntu MATE, Kubuntu, Budgie and so on have all hit the Beta stage so they're ready for some wider testing and reporting. It's also now Ubuntu Testing Week which runs until April 8, which all the effort now focused on ISO testing, bug reporting, and of course fixing bugs.

Have a quick listen to Canonical staffer Alan Pope talking briefly about it:

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Some of the big features landing in Ubuntu 20.04 (and other versions):

  • A theme refresh (with a light/dark switcher).
  • GNOME 3.36 / MATE Desktop 1.24 / Plasma 5.18
  • Mesa 20.0 open source graphics.
  • Firefox 74.0.
  • ZFS storage upgrades
  • Thunderbird 68.6.0.
  • LibreOffice 6.4.
  • Snap Store replaces the Ubuntu Store.
  • And the usual assortment of toolchain updates including  glibc 2.31, OpenJDK 11, rustc 1.41, GCC 9.3, Python 3.8.2, ruby 2.7.0, php 7.4, perl 5.30, golang 1.13 and plenty more upgrades.

One of the huge changes for NVIDIA users are the inclusion of drivers on the ISO downloads. This means you can select to install them together with the system, to get a fully ready to go install of Ubuntu. Additionally, Canonical will now be providing NVIDIA driver updates in the repository removing the need for a messy PPA setup. For Linux gamers, it's a big win.

If you want more information on how to get involved in testing, take a look over on this forum post. You can also find the official Beta release announcement here.

The full release of Ubuntu 20.04 is scheduled for April 23 with main support lasting for at least 5 years.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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46 comments
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The_Aquabat 5 April 2020 at 4:31 am UTC
anyone knows an unsnapped version of chromium that can be downloaded from a ppa??

UPDATE. NVM followed this guide
https://www.reddit.com/r/Ubuntu/comments/dvalkg/ive_really_had_it_with_snaps_partly_rant/f7cfbg0/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x


Last edited by The_Aquabat on 5 April 2020 at 4:42 am UTC
CatKiller 5 April 2020 at 4:39 am UTC
The_Aquabatanyone knows an unsnapped version of chromium that can be downloaded from a ppa??

I use the chromium-dev PPA anyway, since it has the accelerated video decoding patches added. There's a similarly-patched PPA for chromium-beta.
BrazilianGamer 5 April 2020 at 3:40 pm UTC
Nice. Gonna be testing my beloved Ubuntu MATE
Shmerl 5 April 2020 at 5:00 pm UTC
Waiting for Debian testing to get Plasma 5.18. Plasma and KDE frameworks uploads are lagging a lot in Debian these days.
Cyba.Cowboy 6 April 2020 at 5:15 am UTC
slaapliedjeThen they kept determining to be 'unique' in the huge Linux landscape, and pushing technologies that no one else supported, so they didn't get that much support, as Canonical is not that big.. Snap is one of those things, and it's direct competition with flatpak, which a lot of distributions/software has adopted, is what rubs me raw about it at this point.

Some of the stuff Canonical does is / was better than what its competitors are / were doing... Unity for example, was far better than the garbage that is GNOME 3.x. And Snap is theoretically superior to Flatpak in various ways, though Flatpak is more "open", which is an especially big selling point in the Linux Community. Yet another example would be "Mir", which as I understand it is theoretically superior to Wayland, though again, the latter would be considered more "open".


slaapliedjeMy point was that Canonical wanted their own so started Snap, instead of working with everyone else and supporting flatpak.

Your comments imply everyone supports Flatpak, which is not the case. And there are numerous "key" distros that have no support for Flatpak "out of the box" - some of those distros support Snap "out of the box", others support neither packaging format "out of the box".

Canonical is not the only one that uses "bully boy" tactics to push their agenda - The GNOME Project is notorious for this (though they are not the only ones), which is part of the reason why distros will sometimes package inferior GNOME programs by default, ahead of superior alternatives.

You can call out Canonical for being a bully - but not at the expense of pretending they're the only ones that do this...


CatKiller
slaapliedjeMy point was that Canonical wanted their own so started Snap, instead of working with everyone else and supporting flatpak.

You know snaps came first, right? The failed internal Ubuntu project was Ubuntu Phone. Unity, Mir and snaps were all created for that.

This.

And whilst most of the stuff Canonical were pushing has since been abandoned in part or in full, the "end goal" for many of these various projects was far more grand than what most of Canonical's competitors are or were planning... Sadly, most of Canonical's projects never came close to the desired "end goal".


Last edited by Cyba.Cowboy on 6 April 2020 at 5:22 am UTC
Purple Library Guy 6 April 2020 at 6:18 am UTC
Cyba.CowboySome of the stuff Canonical does is / was better than what its competitors are / were doing... Unity for example, was far better than the garbage that is GNOME 3.x. And Snap is theoretically superior to Flatpak in various ways, though Flatpak is more "open", which is an especially big selling point in the Linux Community. Yet another example would be "Mir", which as I understand it is theoretically superior to Wayland, though again, the latter would be considered more "open".
As I understand it, HURD is theoretically superior to Linux. Not sure how far those theoreticals get anyone.
Tuxee 6 April 2020 at 9:03 am UTC
slaapliedjeWait, what? They switched back to Gnome because they don't have the man power to work on Unity, which is just a gnome hack.

No its not. Unless we have quite different ideas what a "hack" is.
slaapliedje 6 April 2020 at 3:40 pm UTC
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Tuxee
slaapliedjeWait, what? They switched back to Gnome because they don't have the man power to work on Unity, which is just a gnome hack.

No its not. Unless we have quite different ideas what a "hack" is.
As far as everything I saw of it, they basically took gtk3 / gnome-shell and tweaked some things on it, made compoz sort of work with it and called it Unity. I never used it much because I hate having the dock take desktop space.
slaapliedje 6 April 2020 at 3:44 pm UTC
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Cyba.Cowboy
slaapliedjeThen they kept determining to be 'unique' in the huge Linux landscape, and pushing technologies that no one else supported, so they didn't get that much support, as Canonical is not that big.. Snap is one of those things, and it's direct competition with flatpak, which a lot of distributions/software has adopted, is what rubs me raw about it at this point.

Some of the stuff Canonical does is / was better than what its competitors are / were doing... Unity for example, was far better than the garbage that is GNOME 3.x. And Snap is theoretically superior to Flatpak in various ways, though Flatpak is more "open", which is an especially big selling point in the Linux Community. Yet another example would be "Mir", which as I understand it is theoretically superior to Wayland, though again, the latter would be considered more "open".


slaapliedjeMy point was that Canonical wanted their own so started Snap, instead of working with everyone else and supporting flatpak.

Your comments imply everyone supports Flatpak, which is not the case. And there are numerous "key" distros that have no support for Flatpak "out of the box" - some of those distros support Snap "out of the box", others support neither packaging format "out of the box".

Canonical is not the only one that uses "bully boy" tactics to push their agenda - The GNOME Project is notorious for this (though they are not the only ones), which is part of the reason why distros will sometimes package inferior GNOME programs by default, ahead of superior alternatives.

You can call out Canonical for being a bully - but not at the expense of pretending they're the only ones that do this...


CatKiller
slaapliedjeMy point was that Canonical wanted their own so started Snap, instead of working with everyone else and supporting flatpak.

You know snaps came first, right? The failed internal Ubuntu project was Ubuntu Phone. Unity, Mir and snaps were all created for that.

This.

And whilst most of the stuff Canonical were pushing has since been abandoned in part or in full, the "end goal" for many of these various projects was far more grand than what most of Canonical's competitors are or were planning... Sadly, most of Canonical's projects never came close to the desired "end goal".
There is a difference between a software project making UI decisions vs a Distribution pushing things. Unity has always been more garbage than Gnome everytime I attempted to use it. The truth of the matter is, both Gnome-Shell and KDE plasma should have been cooked a bit more before distributions started shipping with them. This hatred toward either was based on the few years where they were terrible to use. Now both are very nice, and Ubuntu wisened up and stopped taking the gnome libraries and making Unity.
Tuxee 6 April 2020 at 5:10 pm UTC
slaapliedje
Tuxee
slaapliedjeWait, what? They switched back to Gnome because they don't have the man power to work on Unity, which is just a gnome hack.

No its not. Unless we have quite different ideas what a "hack" is.
As far as everything I saw of it, they basically took gtk3 / gnome-shell and tweaked some things on it, made compoz sort of work with it and called it Unity.

What did you "see"? Did you dig into the code? I honestly didn't. But from the timeline alone that's already hard to accept: Unity was rolled out with 11.04 (the precursor came already with 10.10's netbook edition), pretty much exactly the same time as Gnome Shell 3.0 was presented. A cursory glance at the Wikipedia pages show that Gnome Shell is developed in C/JS, whereas Unity is written in C/C++/Python and Vala. Gnome Shell requires GDM, Unity requires LightDM, Nux instead of Clutter, Compiz instead of Mutter. If you wanted to use Gnome Shell on 11.04 you had to completely remove Unity beforehand.

They used the software stack of Gnome. But calling Unity a Gnome Shell hack is pretty far-fetched.
slaapliedjeI never used it much because I hate having the dock take desktop space.

But you know it's a hack. This smells more like Canonical bashing.
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