Join us on our own very special Reddit: /r/Linuxers

A developer for Collabora, the open source consultancy firm that works with the likes of Valve has sent in a Linux Kernel patch aimed at helping Windows games run on Linux through Wine.

From what's noted in the patch titled "[PATCH RFC] seccomp: Implement syscall isolation based on memory areas", which was sent in for gathering comments (RFC = Request for comments), it seems more and more modern Windows applications / games are sidestepping the actual Windows API. The result? It breaks Wine compatibility as "it doesn't have a chance to intercept and emulate these syscalls before they are submitted to Linux".

What they're going for is an addition to the Linux Kernel, to enable them to filter and find out if the calls being done are from Wine itself or from the Windows application being run. They're proposing using the seccomp function, used usually for security purposes but this is in no way a security feature it's just how they're building the functionality for Wine while re-using what's available.

Their new way will avoid some harsh performance penalties too. An existing method would have added a 10% overhead but they say this averages around 1.5% which is a pretty dramatic difference, for something as performance critical as this. Reading over comments and how it's done, it's possible this can help anti-cheat systems too but as always, don't go getting hopes up over early work that's not complete or merged in yet.

You can see the patch here on the mailing list.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Misc, Wine
31 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
31 comments
Page: «4/4
  Go to:

Eike 17 Jun
Quoting: F.Ultra68020 assembler is a league of beauty and non-complexiness above i386 so you should actually feel lucky ;). I have a few hundred floppys with 68000 assembler code in the basement, don't know if they still are readable though...

I tried to recover data from many 3.5" discs from the 80s and had a success rate well over 95% - quite the opposite to the DVD-RAMs I bought decades later because they were supposed to be especially good for archiving...
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Patreon, Liberapay or PayPal Donation.

We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!

You need to Register and Login to comment, submit articles and more.


Or login with...