Support us on Patreon to keep GamingOnLinux alive. This ensures we have no timed articles and no paywalls. Just good, fresh content! Alternatively, you can donate through PayPal, Flattr, Liberapay or Buy us a Coffee. You can also buy games using our partner links for GOG and Humble Store.

In another important step forwards for free and open standards, plus the future of Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality, the Khronos Group have open sourced their OpenXR testing suite.

What is OpenXR? It's an open standard for Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR), collectively known as XR. It's picking up wide industry adoption, and hopefully means developers won't have to repeatedly rewrite code as they can support a single standard across platforms—something vitally important for the future of XR. It's gotten to the point where even Valve have decided to go all-in with OpenXR in their SteamVR.

Today, the Khronos Group formally announced the proper Conformance Test Suite has been published under the Apache 2.0 license and it can all now be found on GitHub. What's the importance of it though? In their words:

Conformance tests are critical to any interoperability standard. The Working Group has put tremendous effort into this release of the test suite to ensure OpenXR is a reliable cross-platform API. We will continue to evolve and refine the conformance suite; and, by opening our tests to the public, we are empowering the community to aid in this effort. OpenXR implementers are encouraged to use the open source tests to accelerate their platform development, and consider contributing their own tests to help further reduce cross-vendor variability for the benefit of all.

Brent Insko, OpenXR Working Group Chair, Lead XR Architect at Intel

They also launched a OpenXR 1.0 Adopters Program, hoping to pull in more developers to get testing and if they pass they will then be able to officially use the OpenXR trademark on their implementation, and gain patent protection under the Khronos Intellectual Property Framework.

More info in the announcement.

As someone watching from afar, due to the current cost of a VR kit, all these advancements have me thoroughly excited about how VR can progress over the next few years. A proper standard in place can help reduce the burden on developers pushing their games and software across different VR kits and stores.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
14 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
11 comments
Page: 1/2»
  Go to:

Hori 7 Jul
Here's how I hope VR will progress: Valve to make SteamVR good for Linux, as I'm still doing all my VR gaming exclusively on Windows... seriously, that's currently the only thing I use Windows for, VR gaming and nothing else.
bubexel 7 Jul
Quoting: HoriHere's how I hope VR will progress: Valve to make SteamVR good for Linux, as I'm still doing all my VR gaming exclusively on Windows... seriously, that's currently the only thing I use Windows for, VR gaming and nothing else.

Same problem here.. i have vive wireless, the intetl wireless card needed is not detected by linux. No linux drivers at all :( INTEL PLEASE!
Patola 7 Jul
Quoting: HoriHere's how I hope VR will progress: Valve to make SteamVR good for Linux, as I'm still doing all my VR gaming exclusively on Windows... seriously, that's currently the only thing I use Windows for, VR gaming and nothing else.
It might not be perfect but come on, it's usable. I lament to see that you're not trying harder. I don't think learned helplessness will help one bit, users do not need to be a passive crowd here to just sit and wait, and if every Linux user gives up on Linux at the first obstacle, we'll not have anything anyway -- because the collective need will be lower. I understand the power is not within grasp of many users, specially regarding device driver support where the protocols and software mostly depend on the manufacturer, but there is always something that's possible to do, even if it is contributing to Steam reviews, protondb reports, letters to the manufacturers and the likes. And using the very same space here to contact other people who try to use VR on Linux to help each other and do some group actions. But here's the deal, if you are doing all your VR gaming exclusively on Windows, you are not really trying.

What is your headset? You haven't filled it in your PC information.

To help shaking off some of that learned helplessness, here are some interesting things to do with VR on Linux.


Last edited by Patola on 8 July 2020 at 12:03 am UTC
cusa123 8 Jul
This year I resigned myself to buying a vr viewer not only because we are discriminated against in Latin America for not wanting to sell ourselves. So I decided to improve the pc and buy a r9 3900.
The worst thing is that htc is undefined as the titanic and they do not want to make a minimum effort to put the cosmos on Linux at least they would have a good niche that is willing to buy and that's what they need to know that there are linux users willing to buy just like pimax in the forums ask about linux constantly. Not only with this of the viewers but also nvidia and amd are guilty of drivers of ....- You know!
I can't even use my Quest on Linux as it requires 3rd party streamer apps and oculus app, all of which ignore Linux's existence. :(
Patola 8 Jul
Quoting: TheRiddickI can't even use my Quest on Linux as it requires 3rd party streamer apps and oculus app, all of which ignore Linux's existence. :(
Keep trying. Don't give up. Insist on it, mail them, ask for support escalation, get noticed. We won't progress without making noise. I do not have the Quest to even try to help you directly, but look on forums always. Being passive and accepting the situation is the worst we can do.
Patola 8 Jul
Quoting: cusa123This year I resigned myself to buying a vr viewer not only because we are discriminated against in Latin America for not wanting to sell ourselves. So I decided to improve the pc and buy a r9 3900.
You know, this is odd. I came from Latin America too (Brazil), and as soon as I moved to Europe I used the opportunity to order my headset. I felt the same as you. The prices are stratospherically high (the largest blame of that is due to our governments with their high import taxes), and some kits like the Valve Index aren't even sold to us. It certainly feels like discrimination. The worst part is that I have a lot of friends in Brazil to which I tell the wonders of VR only to get dismayed because it's not within their reach. And then I feel guilty after that.
Hori 8 Jul
Quoting: Patola
Quoting: cusa123This year I resigned myself to buying a vr viewer not only because we are discriminated against in Latin America for not wanting to sell ourselves. So I decided to improve the pc and buy a r9 3900.
You know, this is odd. I came from Latin America too (Brazil), and as soon as I moved to Europe I used the opportunity to order my headset. I felt the same as you. The prices are stratospherically high (the largest blame of that is due to our governments with their high import taxes), and some kits like the Valve Index aren't even sold to us. It certainly feels like discrimination. The worst part is that I have a lot of friends in Brazil to which I tell the wonders of VR only to get dismayed because it's not within their reach. And then I feel guilty after that.
Even without the taxes, they are still expensive things to buy. And for low income countries they're just inaccessible. Even in Europe there are countries with low income (by European standards at least), and VR is mostly an unknown and near-impossible to get into without seriously endangering your financial situation.

Even us who own a headset, and even those of us who own an Index, we simply can't deny that VR Headsets are *VERY* expensive. I mean, look at the market share. Price is the biggest reason why they are unpopular. And there are many reasons why the price is so high.
It's improving though.

And hopefully, it will improve in countries like those as well. Taxes are a huge blocker to innovation and progress. And it is (or should be) obvious that innovation from the outside is necessary. VR is just one casualty of this problem, and a small one even.
Quoting: HoriTaxes are a huge blocker to innovation and progress.
Lack of infrastructure is a far huger blocker to innovation and progress. So is lack of robust public-sector research. Both are paid for by taxes, however.
Patola 9 Jul
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: HoriTaxes are a huge blocker to innovation and progress.
Lack of infrastructure is a far huger blocker to innovation and progress. So is lack of robust public-sector research. Both are paid for by taxes, however.
In an overpriced and monopolistic way, because the State does not allow for competition by nature. If these were provided by private companies, it would be cheaper and more efficient otherwise they would lose customers to competition. And their service would be a service, you would pay for what you get proportionally, not an infinite sink of money where you would sometimes see something appear as compensation. The same could be said about private sector research, if it were not for the State-enforced intellectual property laws.
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Patreon, Liberapay or PayPal Donation.

We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
Login / Register

Or login with...
Sign in with Steam Sign in with Twitter Sign in with Google
Social logins require cookies to stay logged in.