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NVIDIA today just released a big new stable driver for Linux with 450.57. It pulls in a whole bunch of big features from the recent 450.51 Beta.

Compared with the Beta, it looks like it's mostly the same plus a few extra fixes. However, it's worth a reminder now it's stable because everyone should be able to upgrade knowing it's a supported driver version. NVIDIA 450.57 is exciting for a few reasons. One of which is the inclusion of support for NVIDIA NGX, which brings things like DLSS to their Linux drivers.

There's also now Image Sharpening support for OpenGL and Vulkan, support for Vulkan direct-to-display on DisplayPort displays which are connected via DisplayPort Multi-Stream Transport (DP-MST), various VDPAU improvements, PRIME enhancements like support for PRIME Synchronization when using displays driven by the x86-video-amdgpu driver as PRIME display offload sinks along with "Reverse PRIME" support too.

On the bug fix side, one of the big ones is that is should be a smoother Wayland experience as NVIDIA fixed a bug that could cause a KDE Plasma session to crash when running under Wayland. They also fixed a bug that prevented X11 EGL displays from being reinitialized. Another KDE issue was also solved, as after some investigation the NVIDIA team found that KDE panels freezing when compositing was disabled was a problem in their driver so that was fixed too.

See the release notes here.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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56 comments
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Shmerl 10 Jul
Quoting: EikeSure, the feature is a compromise, but every computer rendering is compromise.

Yes, but the way Nvidia does it is not good technologically. However since they have more money / resources, they know that once they push this approach (adding more ASICs to the GPU), others will need to either follow it even if it's bad (cheap and wrong way to address quality) or they'll need to invest a lot more money in proper compute advancement. So for them it's a sneaky way to get an edge, but for the end user it's a bad deal.

You should think beyond koolaid logic here. And it's not really about open source vs closed source. It's about technology progress. Nvidia has a lot of power over the market now, and they push garbage approaches due to that.


Last edited by Shmerl on 10 July 2020 at 4:06 pm UTC
Eike 10 Jul
Quoting: ShmerlYou should think beyond koolaid logic here.

(I don't know what that means, seems to be a US thing.)

Quoting: ShmerlIt's about technology progress.

I don'T care too much about the technology. I prefer my renderings in real fullscreen, too. It's just that I don't see how the technology would affect me. neither negatively nor positively.
Shmerl 10 Jul
Quoting: Eike(I don't know what that means, seems to be a US thing.)

"Koolaid" means, that marketing is trying to sell something inferior as much better than what it is and people get hyped and think it's really great and buy it in multitudes.

Quoting: EikeI don'T care too much about the technology. I prefer my renderings in real fullscreen, too. It's just that I don't see how the technology would affect me. neither negatively nor positively.

To clarify my point above. You are right, it's all about trade-offs. But the one Nvidia are pushing is a bad trade-off. Nothing comes for free, so in order to be able to upscale things with machine learning to get better (but not good) quality, they need to use space on the GPU die for dedicated hardware units (called ASICs ) that perform that DLSS.

But guess what, GPU die is not infinite. It means you'll have less space for general purpose compute units. So your GPU will be weaker for other tasks. Is that upscaling trick so valuable to do that? Not in my opinion. But Nvidia uses that trick as a marketing tool to get an edge over competition, forcing everyone else either to follow this hyped and bad approach, or to ignore it, and then some will always complain "but you don't have feature XYZ!". That's what I don't like.


Last edited by Shmerl on 10 July 2020 at 4:35 pm UTC
Shmerl 10 Jul
Quoting: melkemindUsing an A.I. to "approximate" them is meaningless to your eyes. If it looks right and runs faster on your machine, why would it matter?

It's not meaningless if it looks worse than image that's not approximated that way but at lower resolution. I'd prefer the second over the first. But once they stuff ASICs into your card for that purpose, even if you prefer that, it's too late - your GPU will have hardware that's useless for everything else and it's worse at everything else just to support that trick.


Last edited by Shmerl on 10 July 2020 at 4:41 pm UTC
CatKiller 10 Jul
Quoting: Eike
Quoting: ShmerlYou should think beyond koolaid logic here.

(I don't know what that means, seems to be a US thing.)

It's a reference to the Jonestown Massacre.
x_wing 11 Jul
Quoting: TheRiddick
Quoting: ShmerlSo it doesn't increase quality,

I don't think you understand whats going on one bit. But 'when' everyone is doing similar things as to what DLSS does, I'll watch you eat your own hat! :)

Also as someone pointed out, native everything would be great, but lets face it, unless a magical fairy comes down from the silicon heavens and unleashes a compute power revolution, then we aren't going to see CPU's or GPU's for the consumer handle future graphics very well without some way to 'optimize' performance at higher resolutions or fps.

In saying that DLSS2.0 has shown that in areas a 1440p image can look better then 2160p, its not universal but it CAN look decently better in areas.

The elephant in the room here is that this features will probably never work/be used on Linux. I understand that Nvidia has the feature in their Linux driver now but, how you will be able to use it if all games that support it are Windows only? Do you think that Nvidia will work on wine in order to give support?

The same can be said for RT on Linux. AFAIK there is only game that supports RT on Linux.

So, from a Linux market point of view, aren't all this gimmick features?
slaapliedje 11 Jul
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Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: Eike
Quoting: ShmerlYou should think beyond koolaid logic here.

(I don't know what that means, seems to be a US thing.)

It's a reference to the Jonestown Massacre.
Thanks, I was going to point that out.

Funny thing is, I don't think they ever proved it was Kool-Aid, and it was just punch. On the other hand, Woodstock had actual Kool-Aid laced with LSD, so it is fun how different sayings are created. I am sure the Giant drink guy would rather be known for tripping out hippies than the deaths of 900~ cultists.


Last edited by slaapliedje on 11 July 2020 at 10:35 am UTC
oldrocker99 13 Jul
Quoting: Patola
Quoting: oldrocker99I have a RTX 2600 Super, which is inferior to the 5700XT. It's still pretty good, but some time I'll probably go 100% AMD.
You mean RTX 2060 SUPER? Your PC profile still shows GTX 1660.

Yeah, I mistyped in the profile. I'll fix it. I do have a RTX 2060 Super.
ericek111 13 Jul
Finally nVidia PRIME offload sinking! Just last week I spent two days setting up PRIME using nVidia for display and AMD RX 580 as the accelerating GPU. I didn't even know it was to arrive in a few days, lol.
Patola 16 Jul
...aaaaaaaaand the 450.57 driver finally got to the graphics-drivers ppa, but the 32-bits libraries are not being built for Ubuntu 20.04, hence if you install it, the PC boots but 32-bits software like the Steam client won't run.

The current working workaround is to change the repository .list from focal to eoan, then everything works. But the packager responded and said he sent a request to whitelist the nvidia drivers so that the i386 packages can be built.


Last edited by Patola on 16 July 2020 at 1:53 pm UTC
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