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The 2020 Steam Summer Sale ends soon, here's some final picks

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Stuck for what to pick up? With the huge Steam Summer Sale ending tomorrow at 5PM UTC, here's a little helping hand for you on what's good.

I get why you might be stuck, with well over six thousand games on Steam alone that support Linux, it's easy to get completely swallowed up in the vast sea of games. Especially true if you're looking to pick up a game on sale, as there's close to five thousand of those discounted!

Going by games that have a good discount on them and support Linux officially, plus they're rated very highly by users, here's 10 games you should definitely pick up if you don't own them already:

Those are all well-known, often talked about titles that are highly rated but what about the smaller and/or lesser-known titles that still deserve plenty of attention? Here's another few that I think are firmly worth spending some time with:

Picked up something good you're dying to tell everyone about? Let us know in the comments.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Game Sale, Steam
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Jollt 8 Jul
https://store.steampowered.com/app/704450/Neverwinter_Nights_Enhanced_Edition/ 75% for hours of fun online and single player, plus some modules(DLCs) are really cheap and fun like Pirates of the Sword Coast. One of my favorite RPG's. Plus also 7 Days to Die of course https://store.steampowered.com/app/251570/7_Days_to_Die 66%

If you get those look for me on GOL Discord so we can play online :D
Problem is... True native Linux games that I haven't already bought and that got my interest are getting fewer. I settled on Titanfall 2, Doom Eternal and Divinity: Original Sin 2 (which seems to work great after a tweak).

Waiting on Metro Exodus to officially release on Linux before buying it... Kind of contradictory, when you think of it... I'm buying games that are running fine on Proton but I won't buy a game that will release on Linux, even if it runs fine on Proton... Don't know what to think of it.


Last edited by Mohandevir on 8 July 2020 at 8:56 pm UTC
t3g 8 Jul
This is more of a Proton thing, but I’ve had a blast with Titanfall 2 after getting for $10.
WJMazepas 8 Jul
One game that i recommend on this sale is Elderborn. Its a First Person Meele combat with souls-like elements and its really fun. The only problem is that its not too long, i finished in a little less than 4 hours. Still i had lots of fun and will beat the game again.
https://store.steampowered.com/app/673190/AllStar_Fruit_Racing/

This game is very cheap and works just like native on proton. If you have some extra bucks, buy it then we can play together
drmoth 9 Jul
I bought only Linux native games this time around, although I was definitely tempted by some Proton stuff (hello Bannerlord)

- Horizon Chase Turbo (retro racing - ok but got bored quickly)
- Slipstream (more retro racing - ok but got bored quickly)
- Figment (whimsical fun platform puzzler with a surrealist theme - recommended)
- Gibbous: A Cthulhu Adventure (EXCELLENT Cthulhu mythos animated point and click...my top purchase, highly recommended)
- Ion Fury (retro FPS....bit disappointed, realised this isn't really my thing any more, I'm sure the game is fine though)
- Mooseman (interesting northern Russian folklore. I loved Never Alone, and this is in a similar style...looks good)
- Smith and Winston (seems fun, can't wait to play local co-op)


Last edited by drmoth on 9 July 2020 at 3:40 am UTC
CatKiller 9 Jul
Quoting: MohandevirWaiting on Metro Exodus to officially release on Linux before buying it... Kind of contradictory, when you think of it... I'm buying games that are running fine on Proton but I won't buy a game that will release on Linux, even if it runs fine on Proton... Don't know what to think of it.

Makes sense to me: game devs seeing an uptick in sales when they release a Linux version is what we want to see.

Similarly, games run through Proton just aren't worth as much as native games. They work, which is good for us, and they count as Linux sales, which is good for the wider Linux gaming ecosystem, but there's no support: they've offloaded their costs onto the community, and the game devs might break it at any time. Windows-only games, even if they're great and even if they work well in Proton, need to be discounted heavily to account for that; I'm happy to pay full price for Linux-native games, though.
Patola 9 Jul
Quoting: CatKillerWindows-only games, even if they're great and even if they work well in Proton, need to be discounted heavily to account for that; I'm happy to pay full price for Linux-native games, though.
How would you achieve that? Convincing the developers who sell the game to charge less for running under Proton? Convincing Steam to charge differently for games running on Proton? What if the buyer plays the game one week in proton then the remaining time in Windows? I understand that you would be feeling treated unfairly for using Linux, I do too, but we are a minuscule crowd and since we lack options and have to buy such games anyway, I don't think there is a possible venue for compensation for having to endure that.

And in the end, if you do achieve that, you'd be passing the message that if a Windows game runs under proton, the developer/publisher must earn less money. What do you think this incentive would cause? Would it convince the developer to make a native version or make them block proton altogether?


Last edited by Patola on 9 July 2020 at 9:29 am UTC
CatKiller 9 Jul
Quoting: PatolaHow would you achieve that?
By not giving them as much money. It's pretty straightforward.

If a game dev makes a game that doesn't interest me, they don't get any of my money. If a game dev makes a game that interests me, and it doesn't work in Proton, they don't get any of my money. If a game dev makes a game that interests me, and it does work in Proton, they might get some of my money, eventually. If a game dev makes a game that interests me, and they make it Linux-native, they'll likely get more of my money, and sooner.

If a game dev wants to go from none to some they can make sure their game works in Proton and keeps working long enough to be worth a punt. The "worth a punt" price point is much lower than full price. For a chance at a full-price purchase it's got to be Linux-native.
Patola 9 Jul
Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: PatolaHow would you achieve that?
By not giving them as much money. It's pretty straightforward.

If a game dev makes a game that doesn't interest me, they don't get any of my money. If a game dev makes a game that interests me, and it doesn't work in Proton, they don't get any of my money. If a game dev makes a game that interests me, and it does work in Proton, they might get some of my money, eventually. If a game dev makes a game that interests me, and they make it Linux-native, they'll likely get more of my money, and sooner.
Yeah, that's what I try to do but frankly, I don't control my taste and I end up buying games that I like and wish to play, not necessarily native games, and I do think most people end up doing like that since Proton is a big enabler for us. I am a Linux-only user (no Windows at home), and in these sales I spent a small fortune on dozens of Windows games (all of them proton-positive, one of them proton-negative because I am confident I will eventually make it work) and only two native Linux games. Even if I did the effort to only buy native games so as the windows-only developers "get less money", I would be a minuscule percentage of an already minuscule percentage of gamers (Linux gamers), no developer would ever even notice that.

There's no leverage for us as a collective, currently, to try and financially punish developers which don't do our biddings. And as I said with my hypothetical ways to enforce that, it could even backfire on us.


Last edited by Patola on 9 July 2020 at 10:45 am UTC
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