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Taking place during October 26 - 29, the 2020 Open Source Summit has gone virtual and it looks like there's going to be a session you won't want to miss.

With Linux gaming going to new and different places with the likes of Valve, Collabora, CodeWeavers and more putting resources into making it easier to run Windows-only games the interest has definitely increased in Linux gaming. So much so, that more people are speaking up about it at important Linux and open source events.

At this year's Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference Europe 2020 (what a mouthful!), one particular session is quite eye-catching. In fact, the Linux Foundation's email mentions it as a 'CAN'T MISS' event which is being presented by Gabriel Krisman Bertazi, a Senior Software Engineer at the open source consulting firm Collabora. The title of the event? It's on the "State of Linux Gaming", with the event being described as:

For too long, Windows has been the de facto platform for any serious gaming on computers. In fact, there is still much resistance by game studios from supporting multiple platforms, which can be explained in part by the specific challenges of porting them. Computer games are prime examples of complex applications who need to squeeze every bit of processing performance possible out of the system, usually making use of very specialized engines who exploit very specific features of the platforms they were designed for. Instead of waiting for studios to port their games, Wine, and the more recent Proton effort, attempt to fully emulate the original environment these games rely on. Much of this work, though, can only be done efficiently with specialized support by the kernel. In this talk, we will review the recent efforts to improve Linux support for emulation, always with the goal of enabling and speeding up recently released games on Linux. In addition, we will discuss specific pain points for emulation on Linux that we plan to solve in the near future.

So it will be talking about the ongoing work with the Linux Kernel, the Wine compatibility layer plus Valve's fork Proton and getting games of all sorts working well on Linux. Exciting.

This particular event is on October 27 at 19:30 - 20:20 UTC. If you wish to virtually attend, there's a $50 fee and you need to register for it. They usually end up posted to YouTube some time in the weeks following the event. Once we're able to, we will write up some highlights of it here at GOL.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Event, Upcoming
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
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3 comments

Kandarihu 3 Sep
From the headline, I thought it was going to be a LAN party with only Linux-native games in it. Instead, it's going to just be a talk about how to more effortlessly get the Windows games running on Linux.

I wish we could just develop more of a Linux-centric gaming culture that celebrates the games with native Linux support in the same way that the rest of the gaming culture celebrates the stuff on their platforms of choice. That would result in fleshing out our cultural identity as Linux gamers and reward developers for actually going through the porting process.
Quoting: KandarihuFrom the headline, I thought it was going to be a LAN party with only Linux-native games in it. Instead, it's going to just be a talk about how to more effortlessly get the Windows games running on Linux.

I wish we could just develop more of a Linux-centric gaming culture that celebrates the games with native Linux support in the same way that the rest of the gaming culture celebrates the stuff on their platforms of choice. That would result in fleshing out our cultural identity as Linux gamers and reward developers for actually going through the porting process.
Unfortunately, the main way one rewards developers is by paying money for their games, and there aren't enough of us to make that reward very substantial.
elmapul 4 Sep
"With Linux gaming going to new and different places with the likes of Valve, Collabora, CodeWeavers and more putting resources into making it easier to run Windows-only games the interest has definitely increased in Linux gaming. "

not to mention stadia...
developers have to target linux to target stadia...
and contrary to some other streaming services, you can play stadia games on linux desktop.
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