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Microsoft Edge now available on Linux in Preview

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The day has come, Microsoft have officially made their own web browser available on Linux in preview. Microsoft Edge on Linux, what a time to be alive.

While it's currently only in a preview form, this now makes Microsoft Edge available for all major desktop and mobile platforms. Microsoft said in the announcement they will be keeping the Linux version up to date in the developer channel, exactly the same as they do for macOS and Windows. Currently, they're supporting Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, and openSUSE distributions. However, as expected, Arch Linux already has it up in the user repository.

Microsoft noted that the majority of features are in and should behave the same as macOS and Windows. However, the initial release only supports local accounts and does not support online sign in with a Microsoft Account or AAD account and so there's no syncing yet. They said they will be coming in a later preview.

I decided to take if for a spin for a while, take some shots and see what all the fuss is about. Here's the initial setup screens:

As a reminder, this is not the first Microsoft application to be put onto Linux. Technically Skype came way before, although that was available for Linux before the Microsoft buyout. Microsoft Teams is also available for Linux, and has been since late 2019. Still, it's a remarkable change for Microsoft overall, who were once seriously hostile to the open source community. Most of that is history now, lessons clearly learned in some places. Microsoft now love Linux right?

See the full post here.

In other Microsoft-related news, Microsoft opened up their Windows calculator application back in early 2019. Now, developers from Uno Platform have ported that over to Linux too because why the heck not. You can grab that from the Snap store if you want to try it.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Apps, Microsoft
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
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75 comments
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ShabbyX 25 Oct
Quoting: Purple Library GuyGIMP for cropping pages, one at a time, pdfshuffler for sticking pages together and so forth

Take a look at pdftk(1)
AciD 25 Oct
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: AciDNow, do the same with Excel and Powerpoint (and perhaps even Word).
No need for edge when you already have Firefox/Chromium, while on the other hand in a work environment, having Excel and Powerpoint is essential.
Depends on the work environment. I've never actually used Powerpoint at work in 30+ years. And I've been working from home for months and never had a reason to wish my LibreOffice Calc was Excel. I know there are features Excel has that some people need, but just to use it as a spreadsheet . . . nope.

Well, for most people Calc would be enough, but as soon as you need more 'advanced' features in a work environment (which I do for 20 years now), it's unfortunately not there yet.
That, and all the tiny features here and there that makes using a spreadsheet much more effective and intuitive.
Excel 2003 from 17 years ago still is more usable than Calc, so there is a long way to go to catch up.

Don't get me wrong; I fully support Libreoffice and I use Calc regularly, but only when I know I won't need some of those advanced features.
Quoting: ShabbyX
Quoting: Purple Library GuyGIMP for cropping pages, one at a time, pdfshuffler for sticking pages together and so forth

Take a look at pdftk(1)
I looked it up. It's a command-line tool.
I don't want to be using more command line tools, I want to be using fewer of them--fewer tools period, in fact, I want to be using one piece of graphical software. Command line tools for fiddling with visual things is a fundamentally stupid idea anyway. The sequence then goes

Open graphical viewer software, look at visual thing, figure out what you want to do with it --> Close graphical viewer software because you can't wrangle the thing with another tool while you have the file open --> Use command-line tool --> Open graphical viewer software; discover that you didn't do what you wanted to do --> Close it again --> Use command-line tool --> Open graphical viewer software; maybe it worked this time, figure out the next thing you want to do with the visual thing . . .

This is a broken idea. And I can't even imagine how I'm supposed to crop pages I can't even look at while I'm cropping them. Just no. Maybe they're useful if you have ten thousand things and you want to do the same simple thing to all of them so you can use the command line tool to batch them, but that is not a normal situation.
dvd 26 Oct
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: ShabbyX
Quoting: Purple Library GuyGIMP for cropping pages, one at a time, pdfshuffler for sticking pages together and so forth

Take a look at pdftk(1)
I looked it up. It's a command-line tool.
I don't want to be using more command line tools, I want to be using fewer of them--fewer tools period, in fact, I want to be using one piece of graphical software. Command line tools for fiddling with visual things is a fundamentally stupid idea anyway. The sequence then goes

Open graphical viewer software, look at visual thing, figure out what you want to do with it --> Close graphical viewer software because you can't wrangle the thing with another tool while you have the file open --> Use command-line tool --> Open graphical viewer software; discover that you didn't do what you wanted to do --> Close it again --> Use command-line tool --> Open graphical viewer software; maybe it worked this time, figure out the next thing you want to do with the visual thing . . .

This is a broken idea. And I can't even imagine how I'm supposed to crop pages I can't even look at while I'm cropping them. Just no. Maybe they're useful if you have ten thousand things and you want to do the same simple thing to all of them so you can use the command line tool to batch them, but that is not a normal situation.

I'm not familiar with your workflow, but if you are doing your own scanning simple-scan let's you crop and export to pdf (although I've never used it for documents larger than 40-50 pages myself so i'm not sure how prone it is to crash with larger documents). If you get your scans in image formats, i think convert will be also a fast way to to join them all in a pdf, and it's probably installed on your computer already if you have imagemagick on it.
Quoting: dvd
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: ShabbyX
Quoting: Purple Library GuyGIMP for cropping pages, one at a time, pdfshuffler for sticking pages together and so forth

Take a look at pdftk(1)
I looked it up. It's a command-line tool.
I don't want to be using more command line tools, I want to be using fewer of them--fewer tools period, in fact, I want to be using one piece of graphical software. Command line tools for fiddling with visual things is a fundamentally stupid idea anyway. The sequence then goes

Open graphical viewer software, look at visual thing, figure out what you want to do with it --> Close graphical viewer software because you can't wrangle the thing with another tool while you have the file open --> Use command-line tool --> Open graphical viewer software; discover that you didn't do what you wanted to do --> Close it again --> Use command-line tool --> Open graphical viewer software; maybe it worked this time, figure out the next thing you want to do with the visual thing . . .

This is a broken idea. And I can't even imagine how I'm supposed to crop pages I can't even look at while I'm cropping them. Just no. Maybe they're useful if you have ten thousand things and you want to do the same simple thing to all of them so you can use the command line tool to batch them, but that is not a normal situation.

I'm not familiar with your workflow, but if you are doing your own scanning simple-scan let's you crop and export to pdf (although I've never used it for documents larger than 40-50 pages myself so i'm not sure how prone it is to crash with larger documents). If you get your scans in image formats, i think convert will be also a fast way to to join them all in a pdf, and it's probably installed on your computer already if you have imagemagick on it.
I could scan things at home potentially, but the things I would scan aren't at home so it doesn't come up. If I go in to work to scan them, I can use Acrobat at work. So when I'm fiddling with scan files at home it's generally something I'm receiving (I got someone at work to do the scan, or I got a file via interlibrary loan, or a course instructor scanned it and sent it to me, or something) and it's already a .pdf.
So, nice ideas but not really applicable to my situation.
whizse 26 Oct
  • Supporter
Try ScanTailor, it's not an all-in-one tool, it doesn't do scanning, OCR or PDF output. But it is excellent for doing the intermediary steps. Cropping, deskewing, prepping for OCR etc. in batch mode, with a GUI.

It's a little bit fiddly the first time around, but it has quickly become indispensable to me when it comes to wrangling scanned books and documents.

Another suggestion, for batch cropping with a GUI, or any other image edits on large sets of files. Try Darktable. It's primarily for RAW images, but does jpeg just as well.
ShabbyX 26 Oct
Quoting: Purple Library GuyClose graphical viewer software because you can't wrangle the thing with another tool while you have the file open

I get your point about cli and it's valid, but FYI, this is not windows, you *can* modify files while they are open :) last I did this kind of work I could leave evince open with the file and it automatically refreshed it when I changed the file.
Quoting: whizseTry ScanTailor, it's not an all-in-one tool, it doesn't do scanning, OCR or PDF output. But it is excellent for doing the intermediary steps. Cropping, deskewing, prepping for OCR etc. in batch mode, with a GUI.

It's a little bit fiddly the first time around, but it has quickly become indispensable to me when it comes to wrangling scanned books and documents.

Another suggestion, for batch cropping with a GUI, or any other image edits on large sets of files. Try Darktable. It's primarily for RAW images, but does jpeg just as well.
I'll have a look. Although really what I'm working with is generally files that are already .pdf when I receive them. It really seems like software on Linux for manipulating .pdf files is pretty limited--and of course Adobe never port anything to Linux unless they can do it in a half-assed way that leaves Linux a second-class citizen.
Quoting: ShabbyX
Quoting: Purple Library GuyClose graphical viewer software because you can't wrangle the thing with another tool while you have the file open

I get your point about cli and it's valid, but FYI, this is not windows, you *can* modify files while they are open :) last I did this kind of work I could leave evince open with the file and it automatically refreshed it when I changed the file.
Oooh, that's interesting.
ageres 27 Oct
PDF files aren't meant to be edited, and for creating e-books from scans there is DVJU. People sending you PDFs should send images instead.
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